1501 CE to 1600 CE

Astronomers confirm Tycho Brahe's supernova

New telescopes have allowed modern scientists to observe light echoes of the same supernova that Tycho Brahe described 436 years ago. "Last month, the ability of modern telescopes to observe these faint and fleeting light echoes is a kind of time machine. It reveals what happened in an old supernova explosion when the opportunity for direct observation seems long gone."

From the halls of Montezuma

Mexican archaeologists believe they have, at long last, found the fabled palace of Aztec emperor Montezuma, destroyed by the conquistador Hernando Cortés in 1521.

"Lost" medieval church of Dunwich found with modern technology

Marine archaeologists believe they have discovered a medieval church which tumbled off an eroded cliff into the ocean in Suffolk County, England. The remains were discovered using sonar and underwater cameras.

Magellan aided by El Niño

Dr. Scott Fitzpatrick of North Carolina State University has an intense interest in the historic climate. A recent paper by the professor and University of Calgary researcher Dr. Richard Callaghan, hopes to prove that Magellan's 1519 circumnavigation of the globe was aided by weather favorable weather condition including El Niño.

Renaissance armor at the Folger until September 2008

The Great Hall of the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C. glints with Renaissance armor as the library presents the exhibit Now Thrive the Armorers: Arms and Armor in Shakespeare June 5 through September 9, 2008.

Renaissance textiles in Kansas City

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Missouri will present Revealing, Reversible and Resplendent: 15th-17th-Century Italian and Spanish Textiles through August 17, 2008. The exhibit includes elaborately-embroidered and woven religious and secular pieces (photo)

Search continues for "Lost Colony"

Researchers from the First Colony Foundation are gearing up to begin an extensive search for America's "Lost Colony." The project will be covered by the Time Team America program.

Shipwreck cannons to be returned to the Tower of London

Marine archaeologists are working to recover the cannons from an Elizabethan ship which sank near the Channel Islands in 1592. The big guns will be taken to the Tower of London for expert restoration and conservation.

Mummies on display in Capuchin monastery

The mummified remains of over 8,000 monks and city luminaries make for a strange tourist destination, but that is what visitors will find at the Capuchin Catacombs in Palermo, Sicily. The remains date from the 16th century.

New Janet Arnold book to be released November 2008

Janet Arnold's Patterns of Fashion: Cut and Construction of Linen Shirts, Smocks, Neck and Headwear, Etc., C. 1540-1665 No. 4 has been scheduled for release in late fall of 2008.

Was Shakespeare really a Jewish woman?

Shakespeare expert John Hudson has a new theory about who authored the Bard's plays: a Jewish woman named Amelia Bassano Lanier, the first woman to publish a book of poetry.

Portrait of Shakespeare's patron discovered

Experts believe they have discovered a portrait of Henry Wriothesley, Shakespeare's only known patron, under a later portrait of his wife, Elizabeth Vernon. The painted-over image was discovered using X-ray technology. (photo)

Columbus-era ship yields wealth of artifacts

Geologists from De Beers, the diamond company, have discovered the wreck of a late 15th or early 16th century ship loaded with Spanish and Portuguese treasure behind a seawall in Namibia.

Ann Hathaway steps out of the shadows

Best known for her quaint house and her inheritance of the “second-best bed,” Shakespeare's wife, Ann Hathaway, has been mostly a mystery figure. Now a new book, Shakespeare's Wife by Germaine Greer, sheds some light on a little-understood woman. Katie Roiphe as the New York Times Sunday Review.

Canada's Red Bay Project proves Basque whalers visited Labrador in the 16th century

A new report by the Canadian government gives a detailed picture of Basque whaling and shipbuilding in 16th century Red Bay, Labrador. The report discusses artifacts discovered on the San Juan, a galeon sunk in 1565 and recently excavated.

Tibetan Arms and Armor at Met

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City will host Tibetan Arms and Armor from the Permanent Collection through fall 2009 in the Arms and Armor Galleries, 1st floor, Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Gallery.

Gynaecological study of Mary, Queen of Scots finds her an “adulteress and liar”

A new study by modern gynaecologists paints a sordid picture of the life of Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots, who, according to the study, was "a 'moral loose cannon', whose striking beauty and sex appeal gave Elizabeth other reasons to imprison and execute her."

Tudor Cookery at Hampton Court - and Other Treats

Countess Alys Katharine recently returned to Hampton Court to study the cooking of Tudor England. Her report follows.

Madonna of the Goldfinch shows its true colors

A recent restoration of Raphael's Madonna del Cardellino, painted in 1506, has revealed the brilliant colors of the original painting which had been hidden under centuries of grime. (Photos)

Mary Queen of Scots warrant will remain in England

A copy of the warrant calling for the execution of Mary Queen of Scots will remain in England thanks to donations and a law hoping to keep important documents in the country. The warrant had been scheduled to be sold to a private buyer and taken overseas.

Lizapalooza! A weekend of learning with Drea Leed

CostumeTalk.com is pleased to welcome Drea Leed, independent scholar and owner of the most extensive Elizabethan and Tudor costuming reference on the Web, The Elizabethan Costume Page (www.elizabethancostume.net), as our speaker April 12-13, 2008, in Eugene, Oregon. Two full days of lectures capped off with two hands-on, limited attendance workshops!

Royal children subjects of Columbus exhibit

Lady Faoileann reports that the Columbus (Ohio) Museum of Art will sponsor a special exhibit Great Expectations: Aristocratic Children in European Portraiture through June 8, 2008.

The Other Boleyn Girl "more slog than romp"

"According to this oddly plotted and frantically paced pastiche — written by Peter Morgan, directed by Justin Chadwick — the girls were more or less the Paris and Nicky Hilton of the Tudor court," writes reviewer Manohla Dargis for the New York Times.

Renaissance Dance Database

The Renaissance Dance Database is a tool for accessing the various dance resources available on the web. It enables searching by style, creator, primary source, or number of dancers. Suggestions of new links and resources are always welcome.

Dinner: Impossible features Medieval Mayhem

Chef Robert Irvine's cooking series Dinner: Impossible will feature an episode filmed at the Maryland Renaissance Festival.

Mary Rose gets high-tech scan

Scientists at England's Diamond synchrotron are using intense light beams to help understand sulphur compounds in the timbers of the British warship Mary Rose.

Lizapalooza! A weekend of Learning with Drea Leed

description:
CostumeTalk.com is pleased to welcome Drea Leed, independent scholar and owner of the most extensive Elizabethan and Tudor costuming reference on the Web, The Elizabethan Costume Page (www.elizabethancostume.net), as our speaker in April 2008.Two full days of lectures, capped off with two hands-on limited attendance workshops!

Ms. Leed has studied Renaissance clothing and textiles for over ten years. She’s presented papers at the International Congress of Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo and the Medieval Congress at Leeds, England. Ms. Leed has given several talks and seminars on the topic of Renaissance and Elizabethan dress for various groups, and taught a six-week class on Elizabethan Dress at the CostumeClassroom.com. Location:
Eugene, Oregon

"Tudor Kitchens of Hampton Court Palace" at Greenbank Mills

On March 8, 2008 at 10:00 a.m. (US Eastern time) Marc Meltonville and Richard Fitch will present "The Tudor Kitchens of Hampton Court Palace" at Greenbank Mills & Philips Farm in Wilmington, Delaware.

Elis Gruffudd's chronicle of England and Wales online

The National Library of Wales in Aberystwyth has created a digitized version of Elis Gruffudd's 16th century chronicle on the history of England and Wales. The document covers 1066 through 1552.

"Copernicus' Secret" brings scientist to life

Up until now, little has been known about the personal life of medieval astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus, but author Jack Repcheck brings life to the man in his new book Copernicus' Secret: How the Scientific Revolution Began. Owen Gingerich reviews the book for the Sunday New York Times.