1501 CE to 1600 CE

Medieval Dress & Textile Society to offer conference on Henry VIII

The spring 2009 conference of the Medieval Dress & Textile Society will celebrate the 500th anniversary of the accession of Henry VIII to the English throne. The conference will take place in London May 2, 2009.

Secret letters of Mary, Queen of Scots to be available online

Two dozen letters, written in a secret code by Mary, Queen of Scots, will soon be available online to visitors of the Scottish Catholic Archives website.

Experts theorize Tycho Brahe may have been murdered

For centuries experts believed that Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe died from a "twisted" bladder, but recent studies have shown a high concentration of mercury in the astronomer's hair, leading to the theory that Brahe was murdered. Now a "group of conservators, chemists and physicians" wants to open the grave and find out the truth: was Tycho Brahe murdered, and "who done it?"

Digitized Gutenberg Bible to grace Morgan library website

The New York Times reports that the Morgan Library and Museum in New York plans to create a digital copy of one of its Gutenberg Bibles and post it on the library's website.

Researchers use church records to reconstruct weather patterns

A team of Spanish researchers are using records of agricultural rites kept by the Cathedral of Toledo to reconstruct a pattern of droughts that plagued the country between 1506 and 1900.

Early Highland Warror Clothing

Writer Jennifer Hudson Taylor discusses the medieval clothing worn by Scottish highlanders, citing research she conducted for an upcoming novel.

Mystery of Stirling Castle medallions to be studied

As part of a UK£12M renovation of Scotland's Stirling Castle, historians plan to study 33 wooden carved medallions seeking to discover who the carvings depict and why they were carved.

16th century Spanish military tent

Rhys Terafan Greydragon has posted photos of an elaborate military pavilion, once owned by Carlos V of Spain, on his greydragon.org website. The photos were taken at the Museo del Ejercito in Madrid, Spain.

American reforestation may have led to "Little Ice Age"

A new study by Stanford University researchers suggests that the reforestation of areas in the Americas following the collapse of pre-Columbian population centers may have triggered the Little Ice Age which occurred from 1500 to 1750.

Henry VIII: "the man who really invented England."

Historian and curator David Starkey hopes to give those visiting the new exhibit on the life of England's King Henry VIII a fresh look at the monarch. Starkey said the exhibition would go beyond most people's perceptions of Henry and find "the man who really invents England."

Rare straw helmet on display at the Met

Warning: This helmet will not pass SCA inspection! Lady Maggie has discovered an online catalog entry from the Metropolitan Museum of Art showing a 16th century plaited straw helmet decorated with cut velvet and embroidery. (photo)

Correggio makes comeback in Parma

Correggio, one of the great masters of Renaissance Italy, has been overlooked for the past century, but is now finding new appreciation through a full-scale retrospective at various venues in his favorite city, Parma, Italy. (video)

Divers seek treasure-laden Armada ship

Marine archaeologists, led by a Scottish royal, are searching the silt of Tobermory Bay near Scotland's Isle of Mull for the wreck of a Spanish Armada ship reputed to have carried a hoard of treasure.

Tycho Brahe's supernova spotted again

Max Planck Institute scientists report that they have once again glimpsed echoes of a supernova chronicled in 1572 by Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe. The event was bright enough to be visible during the day. (photos and video)

"Five Centuries of Board Games" on BibliOdyssey

The BibliOdyssey blog has created a page displaying "Five Centuries of Board Games."

Remains of Copernicus found in Warsaw

Scientists believe they have found the skeleton of the 16th century Polish astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus. The identification was made using DNA from hair retrieved from the astronomer's books. (photo)

Putting a face to the name: Lucrezia Borgia

A claim has been made that the National Gallery of Victoria (Melbourne, Australia) has the only known formal portrait of Lucrezia Borgia in existence.

Coverup masks reason for demise of the Mary Rose

A new study presents the theory that Henry VIII's flagship the Mary Rose was sunk by a French cannonball, a fact that was covered up to save the image of the English Navy.

Waldseemueller map a mystery

Scholars are still puzzled by 16h century map created by German cartographer Martin Waldseemueller which depicts a vast ocean west of the Americas years before its discovery by Vasco Núñez de Balboa.

Digging up dirt on Martin Luther

German scientists are taking an unusual approach to studying the domestic life of 16th century churchman Martin Luther. They are digging through his garbage.

Modern technology used to help restore "Madonna of the Goldfinch"

"X-rays, CAT scans, reflective infra-red photography, lasers, men and women in white coats, microscopes, latex gloves" all played a part in the restoration of Raphael's masterpiece "Madonna of the Goldfinch," a 10-year project with stunning results. (photo)

Underwear past and present: the legacy of Janet Arnold

The BBC's online magazine marks the posthumous release of Janet Arnold's fourth volume of Patterns of Fashion with an article on underwear trends.

Afflication of the "Ugly Duchess" indentified

The painting entitled "Old Woman," but better known as the "Ugly Duchess," is one of the most popular in London's National Gallery. It depicts the face of a grotesquely-featured woman, and was painted by Flemish artist Quinten Massys in 1513. Now, experts believe that they have identified the illness suffered by this woman as a rare form of Paget's disease, which deforms the bones. (photo)

Neiman Marcus offers jewelry "fit for a queen"

Just in time for Christmas, retail giant Neiman Marcus is offering a collection of extremely rare original medieval and Renaissance rings dating from the 10th century through the late Renaissance, and costing US$25,000 and up. (photo)

Which wife are you?

Have you lost sleep at night wondering which wife of Henry VIII you most resemble? Well, help is on the way in the form of a quiz on the OKCupid website.

Henry VIII biography marks king's 500th anniversary

Henry: Virtuous Prince by David Starkey, a two-volume biography of Henry VIII, will mark the 500th anniversary of Henry's ascent to the throne of England. John Guy of the London Times has the review.

Arr-veh!

Author Edward Kritzler, author of a new book Jewish Pirates of the Caribbean: How a Generation of Swashbuckling Jews Carved Out an Empire in the New World in Their Quest for Treasure, Religious Freedom — and Revenge has probably heard all the jokes about Jewish pirates, but he has the last laugh. Benjamin Ivry of the Jewish Daily Forward has a review.

Henry VIII-era chain of office set for auction

On November 6, 2008, the only known surviving chain of office from the time of King Henry VIII will be auctioned at Christie's in London. The chain is expected to bring at least UK£300,000. (photo)

Prop and costume sale at New Jersey theatre October 25, 2008

On Saturday October 25, 2008, the Shakespeare Theatre Of New Jersey will open its doors for a sale of costumes, props and masks in an effort to raise money for the Theatre's educational and artistic programs.

16th century ship found on "Skeleton Coast"

Archaeologists are working furiously to save the wreck of a 16th century Portuguese ship discovered recently on the Namibian coast. "This is perhaps the largest find in terms of artefacts from a shipwreck in this part of the world," said project manager Webber Ndoro.