1501 CE to 1600 CE

Modern technology used to help restore "Madonna of the Goldfinch"

"X-rays, CAT scans, reflective infra-red photography, lasers, men and women in white coats, microscopes, latex gloves" all played a part in the restoration of Raphael's masterpiece "Madonna of the Goldfinch," a 10-year project with stunning results. (photo)

Underwear past and present: the legacy of Janet Arnold

The BBC's online magazine marks the posthumous release of Janet Arnold's fourth volume of Patterns of Fashion with an article on underwear trends.

Afflication of the "Ugly Duchess" indentified

The painting entitled "Old Woman," but better known as the "Ugly Duchess," is one of the most popular in London's National Gallery. It depicts the face of a grotesquely-featured woman, and was painted by Flemish artist Quinten Massys in 1513. Now, experts believe that they have identified the illness suffered by this woman as a rare form of Paget's disease, which deforms the bones. (photo)

Neiman Marcus offers jewelry "fit for a queen"

Just in time for Christmas, retail giant Neiman Marcus is offering a collection of extremely rare original medieval and Renaissance rings dating from the 10th century through the late Renaissance, and costing US$25,000 and up. (photo)

Which wife are you?

Have you lost sleep at night wondering which wife of Henry VIII you most resemble? Well, help is on the way in the form of a quiz on the OKCupid website.

Henry VIII biography marks king's 500th anniversary

Henry: Virtuous Prince by David Starkey, a two-volume biography of Henry VIII, will mark the 500th anniversary of Henry's ascent to the throne of England. John Guy of the London Times has the review.

Arr-veh!

Author Edward Kritzler, author of a new book Jewish Pirates of the Caribbean: How a Generation of Swashbuckling Jews Carved Out an Empire in the New World in Their Quest for Treasure, Religious Freedom — and Revenge has probably heard all the jokes about Jewish pirates, but he has the last laugh. Benjamin Ivry of the Jewish Daily Forward has a review.

Henry VIII-era chain of office set for auction

On November 6, 2008, the only known surviving chain of office from the time of King Henry VIII will be auctioned at Christie's in London. The chain is expected to bring at least UK£300,000. (photo)

Prop and costume sale at New Jersey theatre October 25, 2008

On Saturday October 25, 2008, the Shakespeare Theatre Of New Jersey will open its doors for a sale of costumes, props and masks in an effort to raise money for the Theatre's educational and artistic programs.

16th century ship found on "Skeleton Coast"

Archaeologists are working furiously to save the wreck of a 16th century Portuguese ship discovered recently on the Namibian coast. "This is perhaps the largest find in terms of artefacts from a shipwreck in this part of the world," said project manager Webber Ndoro.

Dressing well... or else

Toshikage reports that there is much of interest in the way of Elizabethan garb and late period study on the website Elizabethan Mafia: Dressing Well and Calling In Favors Since 1558. The site is the brainchild of M. Alison Kannon.

16th century Venetian fortress walls discovered in Cyprus

Archaeologists are examining the ruins of walls belonging to a 16th century Venetian fortress discovered recently during construction work on Eleftheria Square in Nicosia, Cyprus.

Digital project to analyze Middle English grammar

A team of philologists at the University of Stavanger in Norway are set to begin "the most comprehensive analysis of middle English ever" by studying original manuscripts from the 1300s–1500s. Their focus is to understand Middle English grammar.

The "New Yorker" looks at "The Florentine"

In an article for The New Yorker, Claudia Roth Pierpont looks at the life of Niccolò Machiavelli, "the man who taught rulers how to rule."

Was the telescope invented in Spain?

An article for the magazine History Today claims that the telescope may have been invented in Spain by a Burgundian spectacle maker named Juan Roget, rather than in the Netherlands or Italy, as previously believed.

16th century pottery kiln found in Russia

Excavations have uncovered a 16th century pottery kiln near Tula, Russia. The kiln may have been used to make bricks for the Tula Kremlin. (photo)

Leaveth Anne Boleyn alone!

It just had to happen! A parody of Chris Crocker's [in]famous "Leave Britney Alone" video is available to view on YouTube, this time with a distinctly Tudor flair.

16th century mechanical doll at the Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna

The Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna website features a 16th century mechanical, wooden doll which "plays the cittern, turns its head and seems to mince along with tiny steps while in fact running on wheels." (photo)

Tudor paneling recovered from cow shed

A large, carved panel celebrating the Earldom of Charles Somerset, stolen from Raglan Castle during the English Civil War in the 17th Century, has been returned to the castle. The piece was found in a cowshed in Monmouthshire during the 1950s by an antique dealer. (photo)

Academy da Cavalaria 2

description:
"Teaching the History of Horsemanship and the art of riding well."

http://www.myscaphotos.com/eventannouncements/2k8AcademydaCavalaria2.pdf

(25 Minutes East of Boise, ID)

September 6th, September 20th, & October 25th, 2008

Also see:
ht Location:
Dream River Ranch, Arh Hold, Artemisia. (25 Minutes East of Boise, ID)

[ART] Academy da Cavalaria 2

description:
"Teaching the History of Horsemanship and the art of riding well."

http://www.myscaphotos.com/eventannouncements/2k8AcademydaCavalaria2.pdf

(25 Minutes East of Boise, ID)

September 6th, September 20th, & October 25th, 2008

Also see:
ht Location:
Dream River Ranch in Arn Hold, Artemisia. (25 Minutes East of Boise, ID)

Rare gold ring found in Icelandic burial site

A rare gold ring, possibly belonging to a monk or a sheriff, has been discovered in a grave near Skriduklaustur, Iceland. Gold rings are an uncommon find in Icelandic archaeology.

"The Theatre" discovered in London

Archaeologists are hoping that they have found the remains of The Theatre. Built in 1576, the venue is very likely the place where Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice" and "Romeo and Juliet" debuted. Walls of the building were discovered under a vacant garage.

Queen Claude Prayer Book acquired by Morgan Library

Several months ago, the Morgan Library and Museum received a new treasure: the prayer book of Queen Claude of France, a contemporary of Anne Boleyn. Bound in red velvet, the book is smaller than a credit card and contains "fifty-two folios, painted front and back with a hundred and thirty-two miniature illuminations."

"Dancing Plague" still puzzles scholars

On a street in Strasbourg, France in the summer of 1518, a woman began a fervent 6-day dance that led to a month-long dancing frenzy by more than 400 people. Modern scholars are still undecided about what caused the "Dancing Plague."

Language barrior key to the sinking of the Mary Rose?

New research on the sinking of the Tudor ship The Mary Rose speculates that the ship may have been lost due to the lack of English language skills by the mostly Spanish crew. The theory might help explain the cryptic shout of "George Carew, to another English ship, that his men were 'knaves I cannot rule.'"

Henry VIII collar found

A complete double-S collar presented as a reward for exceptional service by Henry VIII to Edward Montagu, then Lord Chief Justice, has been found in the family home of poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

Renaissance humor explained

Dr. Sarah Knight, a lecturer in Renaissance literature, explains Renaissance humor in an interview for the BBC.

Historic embroidery from the Met on display at the Bard Graduate Center

The Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design, and Culture will present Twixt Art and Nature: English Embroidery from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, ca. 1580-1700 from December 11, 2008 until March 15, 2009.

How do you say "football" in Welsh?

Perhaps football is not as modern of a game as we believed. References to versions of the game have been found as early as the 10th century in Welsh literature and in the Black Book of Carmarthen, the first manuscript written in Welsh, in the 13th.