1501 CE to 1600 CE

The "New Yorker" looks at "The Florentine"

In an article for The New Yorker, Claudia Roth Pierpont looks at the life of Niccolò Machiavelli, "the man who taught rulers how to rule."

Was the telescope invented in Spain?

An article for the magazine History Today claims that the telescope may have been invented in Spain by a Burgundian spectacle maker named Juan Roget, rather than in the Netherlands or Italy, as previously believed.

16th century pottery kiln found in Russia

Excavations have uncovered a 16th century pottery kiln near Tula, Russia. The kiln may have been used to make bricks for the Tula Kremlin. (photo)

Leaveth Anne Boleyn alone!

It just had to happen! A parody of Chris Crocker's [in]famous "Leave Britney Alone" video is available to view on YouTube, this time with a distinctly Tudor flair.

16th century mechanical doll at the Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna

The Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna website features a 16th century mechanical, wooden doll which "plays the cittern, turns its head and seems to mince along with tiny steps while in fact running on wheels." (photo)

Tudor paneling recovered from cow shed

A large, carved panel celebrating the Earldom of Charles Somerset, stolen from Raglan Castle during the English Civil War in the 17th Century, has been returned to the castle. The piece was found in a cowshed in Monmouthshire during the 1950s by an antique dealer. (photo)

Academy da Cavalaria 2

description:
"Teaching the History of Horsemanship and the art of riding well."

http://www.myscaphotos.com/eventannouncements/2k8AcademydaCavalaria2.pdf

(25 Minutes East of Boise, ID)

September 6th, September 20th, & October 25th, 2008

Also see:
ht Location:
Dream River Ranch, Arh Hold, Artemisia. (25 Minutes East of Boise, ID)

[ART] Academy da Cavalaria 2

description:
"Teaching the History of Horsemanship and the art of riding well."

http://www.myscaphotos.com/eventannouncements/2k8AcademydaCavalaria2.pdf

(25 Minutes East of Boise, ID)

September 6th, September 20th, & October 25th, 2008

Also see:
ht Location:
Dream River Ranch in Arn Hold, Artemisia. (25 Minutes East of Boise, ID)

Rare gold ring found in Icelandic burial site

A rare gold ring, possibly belonging to a monk or a sheriff, has been discovered in a grave near Skriduklaustur, Iceland. Gold rings are an uncommon find in Icelandic archaeology.

"The Theatre" discovered in London

Archaeologists are hoping that they have found the remains of The Theatre. Built in 1576, the venue is very likely the place where Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice" and "Romeo and Juliet" debuted. Walls of the building were discovered under a vacant garage.

Queen Claude Prayer Book acquired by Morgan Library

Several months ago, the Morgan Library and Museum received a new treasure: the prayer book of Queen Claude of France, a contemporary of Anne Boleyn. Bound in red velvet, the book is smaller than a credit card and contains "fifty-two folios, painted front and back with a hundred and thirty-two miniature illuminations."

"Dancing Plague" still puzzles scholars

On a street in Strasbourg, France in the summer of 1518, a woman began a fervent 6-day dance that led to a month-long dancing frenzy by more than 400 people. Modern scholars are still undecided about what caused the "Dancing Plague."

Language barrior key to the sinking of the Mary Rose?

New research on the sinking of the Tudor ship The Mary Rose speculates that the ship may have been lost due to the lack of English language skills by the mostly Spanish crew. The theory might help explain the cryptic shout of "George Carew, to another English ship, that his men were 'knaves I cannot rule.'"

Henry VIII collar found

A complete double-S collar presented as a reward for exceptional service by Henry VIII to Edward Montagu, then Lord Chief Justice, has been found in the family home of poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

Renaissance humor explained

Dr. Sarah Knight, a lecturer in Renaissance literature, explains Renaissance humor in an interview for the BBC.

Historic embroidery from the Met on display at the Bard Graduate Center

The Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design, and Culture will present Twixt Art and Nature: English Embroidery from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, ca. 1580-1700 from December 11, 2008 until March 15, 2009.

How do you say "football" in Welsh?

Perhaps football is not as modern of a game as we believed. References to versions of the game have been found as early as the 10th century in Welsh literature and in the Black Book of Carmarthen, the first manuscript written in Welsh, in the 13th.

A Muromachi period Tale of Genji manuscript found in Tokyo

The discovery of a rare full set of chapters of the 11th century The Tale of Genji, believed to be the world's oldest novel, has been found in a private collection in Tokyo.

Italian Renaissance garb exhibit in Washington, D.C. until July 31, 2008

The Italian Culture Institute in Washington will present Splendors of the Renaissance: Princely Attire in Italy until July 31, 2008. The exhibit is open by appointment only and I.D. is required.

Astronomers confirm Tycho Brahe's supernova

New telescopes have allowed modern scientists to observe light echoes of the same supernova that Tycho Brahe described 436 years ago. "Last month, the ability of modern telescopes to observe these faint and fleeting light echoes is a kind of time machine. It reveals what happened in an old supernova explosion when the opportunity for direct observation seems long gone."

From the halls of Montezuma

Mexican archaeologists believe they have, at long last, found the fabled palace of Aztec emperor Montezuma, destroyed by the conquistador Hernando Cortés in 1521.

"Lost" medieval church of Dunwich found with modern technology

Marine archaeologists believe they have discovered a medieval church which tumbled off an eroded cliff into the ocean in Suffolk County, England. The remains were discovered using sonar and underwater cameras.

Magellan aided by El Niño

Dr. Scott Fitzpatrick of North Carolina State University has an intense interest in the historic climate. A recent paper by the professor and University of Calgary researcher Dr. Richard Callaghan, hopes to prove that Magellan's 1519 circumnavigation of the globe was aided by weather favorable weather condition including El Niño.

Renaissance armor at the Folger until September 2008

The Great Hall of the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C. glints with Renaissance armor as the library presents the exhibit Now Thrive the Armorers: Arms and Armor in Shakespeare June 5 through September 9, 2008.

Renaissance textiles in Kansas City

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Missouri will present Revealing, Reversible and Resplendent: 15th-17th-Century Italian and Spanish Textiles through August 17, 2008. The exhibit includes elaborately-embroidered and woven religious and secular pieces (photo)

Search continues for "Lost Colony"

Researchers from the First Colony Foundation are gearing up to begin an extensive search for America's "Lost Colony." The project will be covered by the Time Team America program.

Shipwreck cannons to be returned to the Tower of London

Marine archaeologists are working to recover the cannons from an Elizabethan ship which sank near the Channel Islands in 1592. The big guns will be taken to the Tower of London for expert restoration and conservation.

Mummies on display in Capuchin monastery

The mummified remains of over 8,000 monks and city luminaries make for a strange tourist destination, but that is what visitors will find at the Capuchin Catacombs in Palermo, Sicily. The remains date from the 16th century.

New Janet Arnold book to be released November 2008

Janet Arnold's Patterns of Fashion: Cut and Construction of Linen Shirts, Smocks, Neck and Headwear, Etc., C. 1540-1665 No. 4 has been scheduled for release in late fall of 2008.

Was Shakespeare really a Jewish woman?

Shakespeare expert John Hudson has a new theory about who authored the Bard's plays: a Jewish woman named Amelia Bassano Lanier, the first woman to publish a book of poetry.