1501 CE to 1600 CE

Mysteries of Moctezuma revealed at the British Museum

In the last exhibit of a series on emperors, the British Museum will present Moctezuma: Aztec Ruler which reveals elements of the mysterious life of the last emperor of the Aztecs. The exhibition will run 24 September 2009 to 24 January 2010. (photos)

Exhibit shows "true colors" of Tudor tapestry

Light analysis was used to determine the original colors of a huge tapestry commissioned by Henry VIII. The tapestry is now on display at Hampton Court until January 3, 2010 in commemoration of the 500th anniversary of the king's accession to the throne.

Was Henry VIII's Tyranny the Result of a Brain Injury?

A new theory suggests that Henry VIII underwent a personality change as the result of a head injury he suffered while jousting.

Da Vinci to be subject of cultural theme park

Was Leonardo da Vinci, "poet, musician, philosopher, engineer, architect, scientist, mathematician, anatomist, inventor, architect and botanist," the true Renaissance man, or was he just a "frustrating dilettante?" Curators of the Château du Clos Lucé in Amboise, France, da Vinci's last home, are betting on the former and hope for the success of their "world's first "intellectual and cultural theme park."

Rediscovered "Siege of Boulogne" drawing to be displayed at British Library

A huge drawing of Henry VIII"S 1544 Siege of Boulogne, once mislabeled and believed lost, will go on display at the British library as part of an exhibition entitled Henry VIII: Man and Monarch.

Armor of Henry VIII on display

An exhibit of the armor of King Henry VIII is being displayed at the Tower of London until January, 2010. In commemoration of the 500th anniversary of the Tudor king's ascension to the throne of England, the exhibit will include a full suit of armor from 1544 only recently identified as Henry's. The article includes a 3-minute demonstration with replica armor of how the suit was worn. (video)

Letters and papers of Henry VIII online

British History Online has posted the letters and papers of Henry VIII from the beginning of the king's reign in 1509 until January 1547. The website includes daily journal and calendar entries.

"A Yorkshire Tragedy" added to Shakespeare's works?

British academic John Casson believes that he has discovered previously unrecognized works by Williams Shakespeare. Included in these are a poem, a comedy, and his first two tragedies. Casson also claims to have proof of Shakespeare's authorship of the "lost play" Cardenio.

Galileo's telescope travels to th U.S.

For the first time, one of Galileo's telescopes has left Florence to be part of an exhibit in the United States. according to Derrick Pitts, chief astronomer for the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, the 400-year-old telescope, which bears an inscription in the astronomer's handwriting, is “absolutely amazing.”

Earthquake takes lives, damages treasures in central Italy

Tragedy struck central Italy April 7 when a 6.3 magnitude earthquake toppled ancient and modern buildings in the medieval city of L’Aquila. Over 200 people lost their lives, and the earthquake damaged nearly all the historic buildings of the town. (video)

New book on Tudor men's garb announced

Fat Goose Press has announced the recent publication of a new book on men's garb at the time of King Henry VIII. The book, The King's Servants: Men's Dress at the Accession of Henry VIII, was authored by Caroline Johnson.

Face of Mary Rose's bosun revealed

Forensic artist Richard Neave has reconstructed the face of the bosun of the Mary Rose, Henry VIII's flagship sunk over 400 years ago. The head was constructed from a skull recovered from the sunken ship and identified by the whistle found with his remains. (photo)

Met offers treasures of the Korean Renaissance

Visitors to New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art will be treated to a small exhibit of ceramic jars, lacquer boxes, and scroll paintings from 15th - 17th century Korea when they encounter Art of the Korean Renaissance, 1400-1600. (photos)

Last chance to see the Mary Rose

This summer, the salvaged remnants of the Mary Rose, the 16th century Tudor warship, will go into a sealed chamber in preparation for a newly-designed museum. The current display, "a spooky monument and a time machine," is housed at Portsmouth's historic dockyard.

Handwriting suggests Henry VIII "emotionally dependent on women"

A recent analysis of the handwriting of King Henry VIII shows that he was brought up in a household dominated by his mother and sister, and shows traits of being emotionally dependent on women.

Curved wall of Shakespeare's original theater found in London's Shoreditch

A team of experts from the Museum of London believes it has found the remains of William Shakespeare's first theater which saw the premiere of plays such as Romeo and Juliet. (video)

Armor

I am looking for any sites that show what style armor the irish wore in the 14th century. Any help would be most appreciated. I am new to the SCA and I am trying to find out what armor to create for my persona so I can start fighting. Thanks, Aengus

New "Henry V" aimed at youth

A new production of Shakespeare's Henry V at the New Victory Theater, the family-friendly theater in New York City, co-produced by the Acting Company and the Guthrie Theater, offers fast-paced staging aimed at the theater's young audience. Charles Isherwood of the New York Times has a review.

SCA member creates jewelry for stage production of "Mary Stuart"

Baroness Estrid Nordmark of the Kingdom of Drachenwald reports that she has been commissioned to create jewelry and props for a stage production of Friedrich Schiller's Mary Stuart. (photos)

Galileo's digit part of anniversary exhibit

An exhibit honoring the 400th anniversary of Galileo's first astronomical observations will include 250 objects from the scientist's life. Included will be Galileo's right, middle finger, displayed in a crystal jar.

Display of artifacts from Shah Abbas I at British Museum

A new exhibit of Iranian art dating to the 16th and 17th centuries is now open at the British Museum in London. Shah 'Abba's The Remaking of Iran will run through June 2009.

Example of anti-plague burial ritual unearthed in Venice

Archaeologists excavating medieval mass graves in Venice have uncovered a woman buried with a brick in her mouth to stop her chewing on her bloody burial shroud after death, a practice believed at that time to spread the plague.

Stirling Heads identified

The identities of the 16th century oak carvings of heads found at Stirling Castle in Scotland have long been a mystery, but historian Dr Sally Rush, who has studied the heads, believes she knows their identities.

Big guns of Elizabeth's navy

The Elizabethan era of English history was in many ways a time of transition including in the area of naval warfare. The recent discovery of the wreck of a small fighting ship off Alderney in the Channel Islands offers proof that Elizabeth's navy had "created the first ever set of uniform cannon, capable of firing the same size shot in a deadly barrage." (photos)

Mary Rose to get its own museum

Plans are finally underway for the construction of a museum honoring the Tudor warship Mary Rose, Henry VIII's flagship which sank in 1545 with the loss of 400 lives.

Plenary Indulgences again available in the Catholic Church

In 1517, Martin Luther denounced the selling of indulgences by the Church, setting off the Reformation. Now the modern Catholic Church is reinstituting the practice.

Henry VIII's armor shows king was "larger than life"

New research by the Royal Armouries in Leeds looks at the progression of Henry VIII's girth through the study of his armor. The various suits of armor have been reunited into one place for the study for the first time since the Tudor era.

Submerged island and sunken galley may hold clues to Venetian dominance

Italian archaeologists are undertaking a project to raise an entire island which has been submerged in the lagoon of Venice since the 16th century. Among the artifacts they hope to recover is a remarkably preserved 13th century wooden galley.

The Scottish Prospero

A recent study by Scottish amateur historian Brian Moffat theorizes that Shakespeare's Prospero, the exiled Duke of Milan from "The Tempest," may have been inspired by Francis Stewart, the Fifth Earl of Bothwell, an eccentric Scottish earl who lived an extraordinary life.

Bad eyesight may have affected Galileo's findings

A joint Italian and British project to test the DNA of the exhumed body of Renaissance scientist Galileo may lead to interesting findings, including the theory that vision problems affected the astronomer's work.