1501 CE to 1600 CE

Handwriting suggests Henry VIII "emotionally dependent on women"

A recent analysis of the handwriting of King Henry VIII shows that he was brought up in a household dominated by his mother and sister, and shows traits of being emotionally dependent on women.

Curved wall of Shakespeare's original theater found in London's Shoreditch

A team of experts from the Museum of London believes it has found the remains of William Shakespeare's first theater which saw the premiere of plays such as Romeo and Juliet. (video)

Armor

I am looking for any sites that show what style armor the irish wore in the 14th century. Any help would be most appreciated. I am new to the SCA and I am trying to find out what armor to create for my persona so I can start fighting. Thanks, Aengus

New "Henry V" aimed at youth

A new production of Shakespeare's Henry V at the New Victory Theater, the family-friendly theater in New York City, co-produced by the Acting Company and the Guthrie Theater, offers fast-paced staging aimed at the theater's young audience. Charles Isherwood of the New York Times has a review.

SCA member creates jewelry for stage production of "Mary Stuart"

Baroness Estrid Nordmark of the Kingdom of Drachenwald reports that she has been commissioned to create jewelry and props for a stage production of Friedrich Schiller's Mary Stuart. (photos)

Galileo's digit part of anniversary exhibit

An exhibit honoring the 400th anniversary of Galileo's first astronomical observations will include 250 objects from the scientist's life. Included will be Galileo's right, middle finger, displayed in a crystal jar.

Display of artifacts from Shah Abbas I at British Museum

A new exhibit of Iranian art dating to the 16th and 17th centuries is now open at the British Museum in London. Shah 'Abba's The Remaking of Iran will run through June 2009.

Example of anti-plague burial ritual unearthed in Venice

Archaeologists excavating medieval mass graves in Venice have uncovered a woman buried with a brick in her mouth to stop her chewing on her bloody burial shroud after death, a practice believed at that time to spread the plague.

Stirling Heads identified

The identities of the 16th century oak carvings of heads found at Stirling Castle in Scotland have long been a mystery, but historian Dr Sally Rush, who has studied the heads, believes she knows their identities.

Big guns of Elizabeth's navy

The Elizabethan era of English history was in many ways a time of transition including in the area of naval warfare. The recent discovery of the wreck of a small fighting ship off Alderney in the Channel Islands offers proof that Elizabeth's navy had "created the first ever set of uniform cannon, capable of firing the same size shot in a deadly barrage." (photos)

Mary Rose to get its own museum

Plans are finally underway for the construction of a museum honoring the Tudor warship Mary Rose, Henry VIII's flagship which sank in 1545 with the loss of 400 lives.

Plenary Indulgences again available in the Catholic Church

In 1517, Martin Luther denounced the selling of indulgences by the Church, setting off the Reformation. Now the modern Catholic Church is reinstituting the practice.

Henry VIII's armor shows king was "larger than life"

New research by the Royal Armouries in Leeds looks at the progression of Henry VIII's girth through the study of his armor. The various suits of armor have been reunited into one place for the study for the first time since the Tudor era.

Submerged island and sunken galley may hold clues to Venetian dominance

Italian archaeologists are undertaking a project to raise an entire island which has been submerged in the lagoon of Venice since the 16th century. Among the artifacts they hope to recover is a remarkably preserved 13th century wooden galley.

The Scottish Prospero

A recent study by Scottish amateur historian Brian Moffat theorizes that Shakespeare's Prospero, the exiled Duke of Milan from "The Tempest," may have been inspired by Francis Stewart, the Fifth Earl of Bothwell, an eccentric Scottish earl who lived an extraordinary life.

Bad eyesight may have affected Galileo's findings

A joint Italian and British project to test the DNA of the exhumed body of Renaissance scientist Galileo may lead to interesting findings, including the theory that vision problems affected the astronomer's work.

Medieval Dress & Textile Society to offer conference on Henry VIII

The spring 2009 conference of the Medieval Dress & Textile Society will celebrate the 500th anniversary of the accession of Henry VIII to the English throne. The conference will take place in London May 2, 2009.

Secret letters of Mary, Queen of Scots to be available online

Two dozen letters, written in a secret code by Mary, Queen of Scots, will soon be available online to visitors of the Scottish Catholic Archives website.

Experts theorize Tycho Brahe may have been murdered

For centuries experts believed that Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe died from a "twisted" bladder, but recent studies have shown a high concentration of mercury in the astronomer's hair, leading to the theory that Brahe was murdered. Now a "group of conservators, chemists and physicians" wants to open the grave and find out the truth: was Tycho Brahe murdered, and "who done it?"

Digitized Gutenberg Bible to grace Morgan library website

The New York Times reports that the Morgan Library and Museum in New York plans to create a digital copy of one of its Gutenberg Bibles and post it on the library's website.

Researchers use church records to reconstruct weather patterns

A team of Spanish researchers are using records of agricultural rites kept by the Cathedral of Toledo to reconstruct a pattern of droughts that plagued the country between 1506 and 1900.

Early Highland Warror Clothing

Writer Jennifer Hudson Taylor discusses the medieval clothing worn by Scottish highlanders, citing research she conducted for an upcoming novel.

Mystery of Stirling Castle medallions to be studied

As part of a UK£12M renovation of Scotland's Stirling Castle, historians plan to study 33 wooden carved medallions seeking to discover who the carvings depict and why they were carved.

16th century Spanish military tent

Rhys Terafan Greydragon has posted photos of an elaborate military pavilion, once owned by Carlos V of Spain, on his greydragon.org website. The photos were taken at the Museo del Ejercito in Madrid, Spain.

American reforestation may have led to "Little Ice Age"

A new study by Stanford University researchers suggests that the reforestation of areas in the Americas following the collapse of pre-Columbian population centers may have triggered the Little Ice Age which occurred from 1500 to 1750.

Henry VIII: "the man who really invented England."

Historian and curator David Starkey hopes to give those visiting the new exhibit on the life of England's King Henry VIII a fresh look at the monarch. Starkey said the exhibition would go beyond most people's perceptions of Henry and find "the man who really invents England."

Rare straw helmet on display at the Met

Warning: This helmet will not pass SCA inspection! Lady Maggie has discovered an online catalog entry from the Metropolitan Museum of Art showing a 16th century plaited straw helmet decorated with cut velvet and embroidery. (photo)

Correggio makes comeback in Parma

Correggio, one of the great masters of Renaissance Italy, has been overlooked for the past century, but is now finding new appreciation through a full-scale retrospective at various venues in his favorite city, Parma, Italy. (video)

Divers seek treasure-laden Armada ship

Marine archaeologists, led by a Scottish royal, are searching the silt of Tobermory Bay near Scotland's Isle of Mull for the wreck of a Spanish Armada ship reputed to have carried a hoard of treasure.

Tycho Brahe's supernova spotted again

Max Planck Institute scientists report that they have once again glimpsed echoes of a supernova chronicled in 1572 by Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe. The event was bright enough to be visible during the day. (photos and video)