1501 CE to 1600 CE

Bronzino: most influential 16th century painter in Florence

In the mid 16th century, Agnolo Bronzino was the most respected portraitist in Florence. Now a new exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Drawings of Bronzino, offers 59 of his works on paper. (slideshow)

Curling: Quirky, Cordial...and Period

To many Americans, the sport of curling is a mystery of complex scoring and opaque strategies. A deeper look reveals a sport that dates back to the later SCA period and whose participants have much in common with SCA martial competitors.

Da Vinci resume online

In a letter to the Duke of Milan, Lenoardo da Vinci outlines his qualifications as an engineer and an artist. A scanned version of the resume with translation is available online.

Leicestershire artifacts help tell story of pilgrims' lives

Lead flasks, discovered by metal detectorists, are helping historians understand the history of medieval pilgrims in Leicestershire, England dating from the early 13th century through to the 16th century.

[DRA] A later period, who knew..

The day will be filled with the delights of learning about a variety of subjects all pertaining to the 16th century and the evening will be filled with the delights of food and frolic.

Molinillo discovery proves use of chocolate in 16th century St. Augustine

The discovery of a molinillo, a stick used to mix chocolate, in a well in St. Augustine, Florida leads experts to believe that chocolate was enjoyed in the 1500s in the city.

Renaissance shoes on display in Toronto

The Bata Shoe Museum in Toronto is playing host to On a Pedestal: From Reniassance Chopines to Baroque Heels, an exhibit that "explores two of the most extreme forms of footwear ever worn in Western fashion, the outrageous platform chopine and its eventual replacement, the high heel." (photos)

Late medieval walls found below Edinburgh esplanade

Construction on new viewing stands for the Edinburgh Military Tattoo has revealed two structures dating to the late medieval period. The walls were believed to have formed part of the defense of the castle.

Gothic text found in Salisbury Cathedral

Experts working on restoration of the Henry Hyde monument in Salisbury Cathedral have discovered remnants of Gothic text beneath whitewash on the cathedral wall.

New book looks at four months in the life of Anne Boleyn

The Lady in the Tower, a new book by Tudor scholar Alison Weir, looks at the last four months in the life of Henry VIII's second wife, Anne Boleyn. Janet Maslin of the New York Times has the review.

Diane de Poitiers, victim of own vanity?

Diane de Poitiers, mistress of King Henry II of France, was known for her youthful looks, which kept the interest of the king, twenty years her junior, but did her vanity and desperation lead to her death? Experts believe they did.

Was Shakespeare a "secret Catholic?"

What did Shakespeare do during the "lost years?" Father Andrew Headon, the vice-rector of the Venerable English College in Rome believes the playwright spent the years in the Eternal City and was a "secret Catholic."

Renaissance portrait gallery highlights jewelry

Illusion Jewels, a retailer of medieval and renaissance jewelry, has created an online portrait gallery featuring classic paintings from the 15th - 17th centuries that feature jewelry.

Brits balk at paying Henry's "Deer Tax"

500 years ago, merchants abutting Bushy Park in London were required to pay a "deer tax," a compensation for any deer which left the park. Today, the tax is still in effect and taxpayers are getting restless.

Henry VIII standup

Tudor humor hits the Internet with comedy routines starring Brian Blessed as Henry VIII on the BBC's Comedy Blog. The five videos from Henry 8.0 involve skits combining English history, popular British culture and the internet. (videos)

Roman frescoes restored to glory

The BBC's Rome correspondent David Willey offers a tour of the building and recently restored 400-year-old fresco paintings at the Scala Santa or Holy Stairs.

Embroidered textiles bring high prices at Bonham auction

On December 9, 2009, a collection of 15th-19th century works of art and textiles was auctioned by Bonham's Auction House. Detailed photos of the auctioned items are available to view on the website.

Waldseemüller Map featured in Smithsonian Magazine article

The December 2009 issue of Smithsonian Magazine features an article on the Waldseemüller Map, an early 16th century chart which "changed the way people thought about the world."

Raphael: undone by passion?

Renaissance master Raphael died at the age of 37, at the height of his career. For centuries, historians have blamed his early death on his passion for his mistress, La Fornarina. Jonathan Jones has the story on The Guardian's Art Blog.

Shakespeare's New Place to be excavated

Archaeologists in Stratford-upon-Avon are preparing to excavate the New Place, the remains of Shakespeare's last home.

Elizabeth I and Dudley miniatures fetch UK£72,000

A pair of miniatures, painted by Nicholas Hilliard, and depicting Elizabeth I and her favorite, Robert Dudley, were auctioned recently for UK£72,000. The portraits were believed to have been painted around 1575. (photo)

Shakespeare Quartos Archive features digital Hamlet

The Shakespeare Quartos Archive, a website featuring "high-quality reproductions and searchable full text of surviving copies of Shakespeare’s" works, has been launched thanks to a grant JISC in the UK and the National Endowment for the Humanities in the US.

Fashions of the Mary Rose to go on display

Years after its discovery, the Mary Rose, the famous Tudor warship, continues to excite researchers. The latest items to be displayed show that the 16th century sailor was very conscious of his appearance.

Experts believe software proves Shakespeare collaborated

Sir Brian Vickers, an authority on Shakespeare at the Institute of English Studies at the University of London, is a believer in the theory that the Bard did not write all of his plays alone. Now a software program called Pl@giarism may help his case.

BBC looks "Behind the Book of Omens"

On its website, BBC America has posted a series of videos on the Freer and Sackler Galleries exhibit Falnama: Behind the Book of Omens, the exhibit, which runs through January 24, 2010. The exhibit focuses on "a group of rare and unusual manuscripts that were once used to explore the unknown through divination in 16th- and 17th-century Iran and Turkey."

Scottish Archaeology Month celebrates pirates

Two Scottish pirates, executed in Aberdeen in 1597, were the subject of the recent Scottish Archaeology Month. The stories of Robert Laird and John Jackson were to be told as part of the re-enactment Tales from the Tolbooth.

Early watch depicted in Renaissance painting

Experts believe they may have identified the earliest depiction of a watch in a painting. The timepiece is featured in the 450-year-old portrait of Cosimo I de Medici, Duke of Florence.

[NOR] Much Ado about Twelfth Night

When you think about Twelfth Night, perhaps the Shakespearean play comes to mind, which may then make you think about Queen Elizabeth I (1533-1603) and then you might start to think about other things that are late period. We would like to encourage everyone to come show off their finest in late period garb for their persona at this year's Twelfth Night event.

Jousting with Henry VIII

Henry VIII was known for his love of spectacular jousts. Now visitors to the Hampton Court website can share in his favorite pastime by playing Joust for Henry VIII.

Scholars hope to give John Dee a make-over

For centuries, John Dee, royal wizard to Queen Elizabeth I, has gotten a bad rap. Now a group of scholars wants to restore his image by showcasing his accomplishments. The group met in September, 2009 in Cambridge for a two-day conference.