1501 CE to 1600 CE

Elizabethan theaters and the Internet

In an opinion piece for the New York Times, Scott Turow, Paul Aiken and James Shapiro ponder the connection between “cultural paywalls,” public playhouses, and the free sharing of creative content on the Internet.

16th-century painting found at garage sale

20 years ago, Frederick Wright bought a painting at a garage sale in Indiana because it reminded him of a character in the British sitcom "Are You Being Served?" He has since found out that the portrait is a French oil painting that dates to 1573.

Russian icons at Boston museum

Lady Zabava reports that the Museum of Russian Icons in Clinton, Massachusetts will present a "stunning, major exhibition of 37 paintings and artifacts from Moscow’s Andrey Rublev Museum—most never shown before in the U.S—" from now until July 25, 2011.

Renaissance raised heel shoes web site upgraded

The website "Chopine, Zoccolo, and Other Raised Heel and High Heel Construction," created by Master Vyncent atte Wodegate (OL), has received a major overhaul recently.

Stirling Heads returned to castle ceiling

Copies of the famous Stirling Castle heads have been returned to their rightful place on the ceiling of the King's Inner Hall. A slideshow of the newly carved and painted heads is available on the BBC website. (photos)

Renovation reveals Henry VIII mural

Most people renovating their homes find 1970's wallpaper, but a couple in Somerset, England, peeled back their old wallpaper and found an early painting of King Henry VIII.

Henry to Anne: "Please to have some some remembrance of me"

In 1533, Henry VIII wrote a letter to the object of his desire: Anne Boleyn. The letter still exists, and was reproduced recently on the Letters of Note blog.

Counting the days, Julian-style

On the website Some Notes on Medieval English Genealogy, Chris Phillips has posted a Julian calender, used in England from the 11th - 16th centuries, and it is organized either by historical year or by regnal year.

Space science technology to be used in Renaissance restoration

Two important Tudor tombs will benefit from technology developed for space science research in a new project led by experts from the University of Leicester.

Website covers opening of tomb of Tycho Brahe

Aarhus University has created an extensive website covering the 2010 opening of the tomb of 16th century Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe. The site includes photos and video about the project.

Pieta model found in moldy box?

Most people would not have given a second look to the junk in a moldy box in an antique shop, certainly not a small terracotta statue covered in paint and scotch tape. But an Italian art collector did look a second time and may have discovered the model for Michelangelo's Pieta. (photos)

Maps from Piri Reis to Katip Çelebi' at Vatican

An exhibition of maps from the Ottoman Empire will be on display at the Vatican this winter. The Ottoman Worldview from Piri Reis to Katip Çelebi', a traveling exhibit, was created in celebration of the 400th anniversary of the birth of Katip Çelebi'.

Bronzino portraits at the heart of first solo exhibition

For the first time, 16th century Florentine artist Agnolo Bronzino will be the subject of a monograph exhibition of his paintings. The exhibit will take place at Palazzo Strozzi and will include 80 pieces from more than 40 collections.

What's in David's hand?

A new study of Michelangelo's David concludes that the hero holds a "secret weapon in his right hand." A paper on the subject was presented at "Florens 2010: The International Week of Cultural and Environmental Heritage," a three-day tribute to the masterpiece.

Study of 1510 pandemic may help modern researchers

A new study of the 1510 influenza pandemic by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases may help modern doctors plan for preventing, controlling and treating such diseases.

"Last Judgment" models found in Turkish bathhouses?

The writhing, muscular figures in Michelangelo's Last Judgment fresco in the Sistine Chapel may have been inspired by men encountered by the artist in Rome's gay brothels and bathhouses according to Elena Lazzarini, whose new book Nudity, art and decorum: aesthetic changes in the art of the 16th century explores the theory. (photo)

Tudor labyrinth revealed by Luftwaffe photo

In 1944, a Luftwaffe cameraman photographed a ruined house in Northamptonshire, but what was revealed in the photo was much more important. The house was surrounded by an elaborate garden containing a Tudor labyrinth, a symbol of the owner's Catholic faith. (photo)

Child finds medieval gold in England

A 4-year old using a metal detector with his father has unearthed as 16th century gold pendant which depicts the Virgin Mary and other Christian symbols.

Inner courtyard discovered at Wakehurst Place

Excavations at Wakehurst Place, home of the Kew country garden in West Sussex, England, have revealed the existence of an Elizabethan-era south wing which would have completed an enclosed courtyard.

Nonesuch painting to be auctioned

No trace of Henry VIII's Nonesuch Palace remains except a rare 16th century watercolor by Joris Hoefnagel, and now that is to be auctioned by Christies. The watercolor is expected to bring as much as 1.2 million UK pounds (US$1.9 million).

Rock star treatment for a Renaissance mural

An elaborately painted 16th century chapel damaged during the Second World War is being restored not with paint but with light.

JG Originals Camelot Collection

Affordable, limited edition jewelry inspired by medieval and Renaissance designs. JG Originals - Camelot Collection offers handcrafted necklaces, earrings, and brooches made from high quality fire-polished glass, twinkling rhinestones, and hand-antiqued brass.

John Stow's history of London online

The Centre for Metropolitan History has made available the 1603 edition of John Stow's A Survey of London, edited by C. L. Kingsford. The work chronciles the history of the city from the 13th through the 16th centuries.

Mona Lisa now buried in garbage dump

Thirty years ago, the city of Florence, Italy converted the Sant'Orsola convent, the final resting place of Lisa Gherardini, the model of da Vinci's Mona Lisa, into barracks for the city's Guardia di Finanza. The graves and tombs from the site were dumped into 'Case le Passarini', the rubbish tip near Florence.

16th century Scottish archway destroyed in vehicle crash

An historic, 16th century stone archway on the grounds of Scone Palace in Perthshire was destroyed recently when a van driven by a contractor crashed into it.

Mary Rose artifacts on display for the first time

In late 2009, previously unseen artifacts found on the Mary Rose, Henry VIII's flagship, were put on display at the Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. The artifacts will be included in the exhibits at the new Mary Rose Museum scheduled to open in 2012. (photos)

Artifacts tell story of early colonial life

The website Virtual Jamestown includes a gallery of photos of artifacts found at the Jamestown site. The gallery includes large images and rotating clips of each of the artifacts in the collection.

Pelican and Phoenix portraits hope to solve mystery of royal painter

For the first time in 25 years, art experts will be able to study two portraits of Queen Elizabeth I with hopes of discovering the works' mysterious artist. The paintings will go on display at the National Portrait Gallery in London from September 13 to 19, 2010.

Masterpieces online: Like looking at a painting "with a giant magnifying glass."

Until January 29, 2011, art lovers and historians have the opportunity to study six masterpieces from the Uffizi gallery in Florence in minute detail on the Haltadefinizione company website. The site allows visitors to zoom in on high-resolution images.

Three "new" shipwrecks give insight into the evolution of maritime technology

Three shipwrecks have been found in the Mediterranean Sea dating from 1400 to 1600. One is probably a large English merchant ship and the other two are small and probably of local origin.