1501 CE to 1600 CE

Technology to be used to crack mystery of Howard tombs

Dr Phillip Lindley of Leicester University and experts from EuroPac 3D plan to use lasers and x-rays to scan and reconstruct the tombs of Thomas Howard, the third Duke of Norfolk, and Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond, both prominent in the reign of Henry VIII.

16th century Chinese bronze found in shipwreck off Mexico

A 16th century Chinese bronze in the form of a Foo Dog has been found off the Pacific coast of Baja, Mexico. The artifact is believed to come from the cargo of the galleon San Felipe which disappeared in 1576.

15th century ring found in Bulgarian monastery excavation

A team of Bulgarian archaeologists are engaged in the excavation of St. Peter and St. Paul monastery in Veliko Tarnovo, the capital of the Second Bulgarian Empire. One of the finds is a silver ring dating to the 15th-16th centuries. (photo)

Accidental death in Tudor England

Oxford University historian, Dr. Steven Gunn, has undertaken the task of scouring 16th Century coroners' reports to compile a list of accidental deaths in Tudor, England. The list includes death by bears and archery accidents.

Renaissance Clothing by The Tudor Shoppe

Renaissance Costumes and medieval clothing for those with discriminating taste. Also, buttons, patterns, notions, jewelry, tapestries, toys, swords, panther tents, and more.

Was Jane Shaxspere the inspiration for Ophelia?

In Hamlet, the melancholy Ophelia drowns while picking flowers. Now a new study of accidental deaths in Tudor England may find a real-life link to Shakespeare's tragic heroine.

Spanish documents describe Irish settlement in South Carolina

Early 16th century Spanish explorers in North America reported the existance of a settlement in modern-day South Carolina of people with "red to brown hair, tan skin and gray eyes." The settlement was called Duhare.

Mercaston posy ring declared treasure

“+I LIKE MI CHOIES” reads the inscription on a silver posy ring found in a field by a British metal detector enthusiast. The ring has been declared treasure by the British Museum. (photo)

Shakespeare and Olympics share billing in 2012 London

In 2012, England will celebrate hosting the Olympic Games, but the year will also include a huge celebration of the works of William Shakespeare. Vanessa Thorpe of the Guardian offers a rundown of cultural events involving Shakespeare.

Stirling restored

Those gentles making the journey to Scotland will want to include Stirling Castle on their itinerary. The castle is in the midst of being completely restored. BBC News has a slideshow of the results.

Coin composition tells story of Europe's Price Revolution

Anne-Marie Desaulty believes coins can tell a story. She and colleagues from the University of Lyon are using mass spectrometry to study isotopes of lead and copper found in coins of the 16th and 17th centuries in hopes of discovering the cause of the great Price Revolution.

The literary origin of ‘Syphilis’

For centuries, people have dreaded the diagnosis of the STD Syphilis, but where did the name originate? Acording the the website Science Friday, Syphilus was the name of the hero of a epic poem written by Hieronymus Fracastorius in 1530.

Shakespeare: The most influential person who ever lived

Stephen Marche believes William Shakespeare is the most influential man in history, showing up in the most obvious - and unexpected - places.

Google Earth search leads to discovery of five Indian forts

Sachin Joshi, a research assistant at Deccan College Postgraduate and Research Institute, noticed some unusual wall-like structures in the Raigad district of India while perusing Google Earth images. Upon investigations, the walls were discovered to be five forts dating to the 15th and 16th centuries.

Prayer book and crucifix of Mary Queen of Scots reunited in Scotland

As she walked to the scaffold to be executed, Mary Queen of Scots carried an ornate crucifix and a Book of Hours. Now both artifacts, thought to have been carried by Mary, were reunited for a day at Loretto School in Musselburgh, East Lothian. (photo)

Diana Gabaldon reviews "Elizabeth I"

Author of the Outlander series, Diana Gabaldon, recently reviewed Elizabeth I by Margaret George. The review was published in the Washington Post.

The "Shiksa" looks at Tudor cooking

On her blog The Shiksa in the Kitchen, Tori Avey discusses food in Tudor England and the "exotic and lavish culinary habits of the British royal monarchy during the 1500’s."

Final flight of the Endeavour to carry Mary Rose artifact

John Lippiett, chief executive of the Mary Rose Trust, is sending a piece of history into space: "a parrel, a three-inch wooden ball used as part of the mechanism to hoist the sails of Henry VIII's flagship." The artifact will be launched into orbit with the space shuttle Endeavour. (photos)

Drea Leed publishes Elizabethan costume book online

Costume historian Drea Leed has recently published the wardrobe inventories of Queen Elizabeth I. Her work is available online in a searchable format.

Vandalism mars 16th century Persian masterpieces

Auction houses have long profited from the 19th century practice of destroying precious painted manuscripts from Iran, India or Turkey by selling pages ripped from the books. Souren Melikian of the New York Times looks at this phenomenon.

Dürer star charts auctioned

On March 30, 2011, the world's oldest printed star charts, created by German Renaissance artist Albrecht Dürer, were auctioned by Sotheby's auction house in London. The woodcuts were first printed in 1515. (photo)

Early music recording climbing the charts in Britain

The latest "hit" on British pop music charts is not a rap song, but a 450-year-old Italian Renaissance mass recorded by the British vocal group I Fagiolini.

The Berry site: A Spanish "lost colony"

Did Spanish conquistadors first settle North Carolina? After discoveries in the 1980's along the Catawba River, where archaeologists found a Spanish fort, they just may have. The Berry Site is located near Morganton, North Carolina.

World chronicle digitized

An amazing fifty-foot (16 meter) long parchment scroll chronicling the history of the western world from creation through the year 1461 has recently been digitized by the Northeast Document Conservation Center. The scroll is lavishly illuminated. (photos)

Henry VIII is a doll!

Tudor parents and children will want to take a look at a charming set of felt dolls depicting the Court of King Henry VIII. The dolls were created by Deriana, and photos are posted on her Live Journal page. (photos)

Save the Philadelphia textiles!

On the A Fashionable Excuse blog, Lady Elizabeth of Rivenstar reports that a box of 15th-16th century textiles was recently discovered in the Design Center of Philadelphia University. Now a fundraiser is in the works where those willing to donate will be given access to study the fabrics. (photo)

Genetic blood disorder may explain tragedy of Henry VIII

According to a new study, multiple miscarriages and dramatic personality transformation may be linked to a genetic condition related to the blood group carried by King Henry VIII of England.

16th century defenses discovered at Stirling Castle

Renovation work for the gift shop at Scotland's historic Stirling Castle has unearthed the castle's 16th century defenses, which were built using the latest techniques around 1540. The defences were demolished during modernization in the 18th century.

Luxury items more common in 16th century Ireland than previously believed

Common wisdom about 16th century Ireland, namely that it was a backwater, is being challeneged by a new study by PhD student Susan Flavin. She has looked at imports from England to Ireland between 1503 and 1600 and contradicts the common assumption.

Elizabethan theaters and the Internet

In an opinion piece for the New York Times, Scott Turow, Paul Aiken and James Shapiro ponder the connection between “cultural paywalls,” public playhouses, and the free sharing of creative content on the Internet.