Scottish

Scottish

The Mystery of Scotland's Brochs

Archaeologist Caroline Wickham-Jones looks at Scotland's 2,000-year-old stone towers known as brochs, which were built by master builders for the purpose of defense.

Bronze Age Cairn Links Wales and Scotland

A Welsh burial mound from the Bronze Age reveals links to northern Scotland. Clues show that burial customs were similar to those in the Orkneys and Perthshire in Scotland.

Archaeological Survey of Royal Mile to be Conducted

Radar technology will be used to aid archaeological work on Edinburgh's Royal Mile. Researchers hope to discover such historical buildings as Edinburgh's Tollbooth and Tyne Gaol.

Design your Own Tartan

The Interactive Tartan Weaver, located in Conrie, Perthshire, Scotland, has a website which allows visitors to design and produce images of their own tartans.

A Scottish Fortress in England

Several castles in Scotland were either built from new — Lochmaben, in Dumfriesshire — or substantially rebuilt and extended — Roxburgh, in the Scottish Borders — by the English during the Wars of Independence of the 14th century. But there is one famous English castle that can claim to be Scottish.

Clan Loch Laven

A Scottish household dedicated to the pursuit of a traditional Scotland through the SCA.

Aberdeen Kirk May Hide 12th Century Foundations

Researchers from around the world are teaming up to explore what lies beneath Aberdeen, Scotland's famous Mither Kirk. In a six-month excavation undertaken to shore up the church's foundations, they hope to learn more about its medieval history.

Atlanta Pipe Band to Hold Concert

Bagpipe enthusiasts in the Atlanta, Georgia area will want to mark their calendars in anticipation of a concert by the Atlanta Pipe Band "a leading show and competition band in the south," according to their website.

Duke of Buccleuch to Fund Preservation of Newark Castle

The crumbling tower of the 15th century Newark Castle was the scene of one of the bloodiest incidents between the English and the Scots. Now the UK's biggest private landowner, the Duke of Buccleuch, has agreed to take on the task of preserving the monument.

Wallace Execution Headlined Medieval Fair

The execution of Scottish hero William Wallace appears to have been the opening act for a medieval carnival in August of 1305.

Edinburgh's Short-hole Golf Course Site of Plague Burial

Edinburgh's revered Bruntsfield Links, a short-hole golf course, may actually be the grave site of vicitims of the city's Black Plague from the 15th and 17th centuries.

Kilt Causes Controversy at High School Dance

Nathan Warmack, who wore a traditional kilt to a high school dance, has asked for dress codes to be changed after he was forced to change his clothes by a school official.

All about "Auld Lang Syne"

How many times have you wondered about the origin of the song "Auld Lang Syne?" Just in time for New Year's Day, Dover Publications offers a brief history, and the words to all five verses.

Canongate Hopes for Redevelopment Soon

The plans for a UK£180 million redevelopment, including offices, modern apartments and a five-star hotel, of the Canongate, an area dating back to 1128, mark a remarkable turnaround in the fortunes of this part of the Royal Mile.

Rare Iron Age Burial Found in Scotland

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of an Iron Age warrior near Dunbar, Scotland. The grave is only the third such ever found in the country.

Lottery Benefits 10th Century Rattray Chapel

A British lottery fund has donated approximately $100,000 to the Aberdeenshire Council to help maintain the 10th century Rattray Chapel.

Stirling Castle Offers Virtual Tour

Stirling Castle in Scotland has created a virtual tour of the facility in its lobby in order to offer visitors with physical limitations the opportunity to see the entire site.

Haggis Hunt

They're at it again! The annual Haggis Hunt is on with prizes for those who can snare the Golden Haggis.

Why We Document

Bridgette Kelly MacLean, from the Kingdom of AEthelmearc, relates a story about two weavers, a forgotten book and the importance of documentation for the future.

Walking Roman Scotland

The current online issue of Walkwise, Scotland's walking magazine, features a list of walking excursions that explore Roman sites in Scotland.

12th Century Farm Discovered Beneath Scottish Hotel

The remnants of a building dating to 1150 and a garden wall have been discovered on the grounds of the Norton House Hotel, near Ingliston, Scotland. Archaeologists feel that the find has "national significance."

Life in Roman Scotland

Judy Vickers of the Scotsman looks at the Roman legacy in Scotland and how they influenced life north of Hadrian's Wall.

Iona II

Archaeologists working in Scotland believe they have found the site of a second monastery founded in the 6th century by St. Columba, founder of Iona.

Skara Brae: an Ancient Village Revealed

Archeologist Caroline Wickham-Jones, who lives in Orkney, looks at the ancient village of Skara Brae, the neolithic settlement on Scotland's windy northern isles.

Kilts from Togas?

What did the Romans do for Scotland? Allan Burnett looks at the Roman legacy in the country from the Battle of Mons Graupius to the 3rd century, including an observation that the idea for the kilt may have come from the Roman toga.

Cowgate Proves to be Extremely Rich Medieval Site

The 2002 fire which devasted part of Edinburgh's Cowgate district opened up a treasure trove for archaeologists with the discovery of hundreds of 15th century artefacts, making the site on a par with medieval sites in London and York.

Medieval Monks May have Held Secrets of Diet Pill

An herbal remedy used by 12th century Scottish monks may be resurrected as a modern appetite suppressant.

Scotch Whisky: A Liquid History

Los Angeles Times staff reporter Charles Perry reviews Scotch Whisky: A Liquid History by Charles MacLean, a new book tracing the drink's history from medieval times to the present.

Campaign to "Save the Monument" Launched

A group of William Wallace enthusiasts have set out to save and preserve the site where the Scottish hero was betrayed. The site, near Glasgow, has become a dumping ground and popular haunt of drug users.

Who Was the Real William Wallace?

In an article for The Scotsman, Jim Gilchrist looks at the real man behind the Victorian - and Mel Gibson's - version of William Wallace.