Scottish

Scottish

Antonine Wall: Scotland's hidden Roman treasure

When blogger Keir Roper-Caldbeck planned to bicycle the length of -- and report on -- Scotland's newest World Heritage site, the Antonine Wall, he thought it would be an easy task. That proved not to be the case. His blog of the journey is online.

Calling AAA: Mons Meg has a flat

Historic Scotland experts were called in recently to assess damage to Mons Meg, the historic cannon on the ramparts of Edinburgh Castle, which has a broken wheel.

Metal detector finds UK£1m torcs

Metal detector enthusiast David Booth was "stunned" to learn that four Iron Age gold torcs, dating to late Roman times, could bring him over UK£1m. The torcs were discovered in September 2009 in Stirlingshire, Scotland. (photo & video)

Controversial Wallace statue returned to creator

For more than ten years, a 13-foot, sandstone statue of William Wallace held a place of honor at the Wallace Monument in Stirling, Scotland, but last year it was returned to sculptor Tom Church "to make way for a new visitor centre." (photo)

Experts assess condition of Scotland's cliff-bound Old Wick

An archaeologist and a stonemason recently risked life and limb to investigate the ruins of the Old Man of Wick, a 12th century Scottish castle believed to have been built by Harald Maddadsson, the Earl of Orkney. The castle is perched precariously on the edge of a cliff overlooking the sea.

13th century Perth Charter restored

The year-long project to restore the Royal Charter of the city of Perth, Scotland has been completed. The status of Royal Burgh was given to Perth in 1210 by King William the Lion of Scotland. (photo)

Travel Skotland at your own risk!

Medieval Scotland may not have been as welcoming to Norse travelers as one would think. According to a 13th century Viking travel guide, the country was "full of dangerous natives who speak an incomprehensible language and the is weather awful." The 13th century chronicle warned Icelandic merchants away from the area.

Scottish Archaeology Month celebrates pirates

Two Scottish pirates, executed in Aberdeen in 1597, were the subject of the recent Scottish Archaeology Month. The stories of Robert Laird and John Jackson were to be told as part of the re-enactment Tales from the Tolbooth.

G.I. Joe goes regimental

Have you ever wanted to learn to wrap a great kilt? Or... do you have a G.I. Joe action figure in need of Scottish garb? If the answer to either of these questions is yes, you'll want to visit the Fabrics of Time and Space website for a tutorial.

Paisley loo is archaeologists' dream

“What’s unusual is that it hasn’t been messed with. This is a loo that hasn’t been flushed for 500 years. We have a kind of sealed environment, containing artefacts like the earliest known piece of Scottish music, which we found scratched into pieces of slate," said archaeology professor Steven Driscoll of the recent excavation of a 15th century Scottish sanitation drain.

15th century Scottish palace excavated

Experts from Murray Archeological Services are overseeing excavation of the site of a 15th century palace, occupied by Bishop Carnock, near Brechin Cathedral in Scotland. STV has the story. (video)

Invergarry Castle gets a "Second Life"

Invergarry Castle in the Highlands of Scotland is a ruin. It was burned by Cromwell and later ransacked by English soldiers, but it now has a new virtual life in the online world of Second Life.

Haggis invented by the English

English historian Catherine Brown, whose documentary Made in Scotland aired recently on British television, claims that haggis "was originally an English dish."

Orkney neolithic cathedral "built to impress"

A 65 ft. (21 meter) long structure dating back 5,000 years has been discovered at the Ness of Brodgar in Scotland's Orkney Islands. The walls of the structure, which would have been 16ft (5 meters) thick and surrounding a cross-shaped inner sanctum, still stand.

Braveheart #2 of "10 most historically inaccurate movies"

Caroline White of the Times Online has put together a list of the "10 most historically inaccurate movies" of all time. Mel Gibson holds the record with three of the ten, including 1995's Braveheart.

Tram workers discover skeletons on Leith Walk

Construction workers in Edinburgh, Scotland have discovered the site of a medieval graveyard at the junction of London Road and Elm Row. An archaeological team has been sent in to catalog and remove the remains.

Paper studies domestic animals in medieval Scotland

Dogs, cats and horses in the Scottish medieval town, a scholarly paper by Catherine Smith, looks at the presence of domesticated animals in medieval life. The paper studies recent discoveries at archaeological sites.

Battle fashion of medieval Scots not kilts

Lovers of the great kilt might be somewhat disturbed to learn that medieval Scottish soldiers dressed in war shirts dyed yellow with horse urine rather than the traditional kilt depicted in Mel Gibson's Braveheart. Simon Johnson of the Telegraph has the story.

Remains of a Stirling knight

Researchers believe that the skeleton of a young man found at Stirling Castle in Scotland may be those of a knight killed in battle in the early 15th century. The bones were discovered in the castle's chapel in 1997.

Hebrides Scots linked to Irish invaders

A new DNA study may prove a 10th century historical source which states that the western islands of Scotland were invaded by the Irish in the early 6th century. The new evidence shows "a significant Irish genetics component in Scots' ancestry." The study may also prove that the invasions occurred earlier than the 6th century.

In 1492 Scotto sailed the ocean blue, laddie

According to Spanish historian Alfonso Ensenat de Villalonga, Christopher Columbus was born in Genoa, Italy to Scottish shopkeepers, and was christened Peter Scotto.

Stirling Heads identified

The identities of the 16th century oak carvings of heads found at Stirling Castle in Scotland have long been a mystery, but historian Dr Sally Rush, who has studied the heads, believes she knows their identities.

Robert the Bruce's palace found

Lost for more than 700 years, the palace of Robert the Bruce may have been discovered in Renton "a run-down area of West Dunbartonshire." Experts have found artifacts and foundations matching historic documents relating to the Bruce's home.

Rare face-mask jug found in Scotland

An archaeological dig at the site of the former Rothesay Council Chambers in Scotland has unearthed a rare 13th century ceramic jug. (photo)

Secret letters of Mary, Queen of Scots to be available online

Two dozen letters, written in a secret code by Mary, Queen of Scots, will soon be available online to visitors of the Scottish Catholic Archives website.

Edinburgh University Press journals online

Philip Cromwell reports that for the next two months, the Edinburgh University Press will allow full access to its journal library, including the Scottish Historical Review and the Journal of Scottish Historical Studies.

Mystery of Stirling Castle medallions to be studied

As part of a UK£12M renovation of Scotland's Stirling Castle, historians plan to study 33 wooden carved medallions seeking to discover who the carvings depict and why they were carved.

Modern apprentices to learn medieval skills

The castles and stately homes of Scotland have an ongoing need for joiners and plumbers and the like who are trained in modern and historical arts and trades. A new program seeks to train people in the necessary skills with an apprenticeship.

Following the path of our Scotch-Irish ancestors

"Growing up in North Carolina, I always knew we had a huge group of Scotch-Irish settlers in the Piedmont of the Carolinas, but I didn't understand their ancestry. Were they from Scotland or Ireland?" Jennifer Hudson Taylor looks for an answer on her blog.

Divers seek treasure-laden Armada ship

Marine archaeologists, led by a Scottish royal, are searching the silt of Tobermory Bay near Scotland's Isle of Mull for the wreck of a Spanish Armada ship reputed to have carried a hoard of treasure.