Scottish

Scottish

"Seventh signal" leads to medieval seal

British metal detectorist David Booth, who in 2009 discovered four Iron Age torcs, has made another important discovery: a 13th century silver seal bearing a carving of a Roman figure in red jasper. (photo)

Stonemasons' university at Edinburgh cathedral

Medieval skills and traditions are passed on to a new generation of stonemasons each year at the stonemasonry workshop at St Mary's Cathedral in Edinburgh, Scotland. The workshop is a joint effort by the cathedral and Telford College.

Happy belated birthday, Scotch!

Experts have determined that Scotch whiskey was born on June 1, 1495 when King James of Scotland commissioned Friar Jon Cor to makes eight bowls of the potent drink. Wired Magazine celebrates the event in their "This Day in Tech" column.

Face of a 14th century knight revealed

State-of-the-art technology has been used to reconstruct the face of a medieval knight whose skeleton was discovered beneath Stirling Castle in Scotland. (photo)

Roman altar stones give insight into religious practices

Archaeologists in Scotland are excited about the discovery of Roman altar stones found in a cricket pavilion in Musselburgh, East Lothian, finding them "the most significant find of their kind in the past 100 years."

[EAS] Demo and Clan War

Come join us at the Rhode Island Scottish Highland Festival Demo and Clan war on June 12, 2010. We have the honor of having this event be a Royal & Highnesses Progress.

"Long lost language of the Picts" identified

Long thought to be artistic images of hunters and animals, the engravings on the famous Iron Age Pictish Stones are now believed to be the written language of the Pictish people, an ancient language recognized by the Venerable Bede.

Lewis Chessmen ad campaign angers Scottish politicians

An ad campaign by the British Museum in which the famous Lewis Chessmen are referred to as "Norwegian" has angered Scottish Members of Parliament.

British ponder mystery of Richard II

A visit to Westminster Abbey will show visitors the tomb of King Richard II - or will it? Researchers are wondering if tests on remains found at a former Dominican friary in Stirling, Scotland might determine them to be those of the 14th century king.

Hidden bee hive found at Rosslyn Chapel

As workers carefully dismantled several roof pinnacles at Rosslyn Chapel during a UK£13M renovation project, they found that one of the pinnacles was deliberately hollowed out during its fabrication to make a beehive.

Medieval Studies Conference

Penn State is pleased to announce the twenty-second Medieval Studies conference will be held on Saturday, May 1, 2010 in the Weaver Building on the University Park campus of the Pennsylvania State University.

Search on for St. Columba's Scottish monastery

Archaeologists from Orkney College are looking for the original 6th century monastery built by the Irish monk St. Columba on the island of Iona, off Mull in the Scottish Hebrides.

Winter festivals feature fire in Spain and Scotland

An article on Boston.com looks at the power of purifying fire in European myth and imagination in two festivals, Up Helly Aa and the Feast of Saint Anthony the Great. (22 large photos)

Scots do not regard "Scots" as a language

A recent Scottish campaign to restore the Scottish language is meeting with some resistance - from the Scottish people.

Late medieval walls found below Edinburgh esplanade

Construction on new viewing stands for the Edinburgh Military Tattoo has revealed two structures dating to the late medieval period. The walls were believed to have formed part of the defense of the castle.

Celtic Psalter on display for first time at the University of Edinburgh

The Celtic Psalter, Scotland's oldest book, dating to the 11th century, has been placed on display at the University of Edinburgh for the first time in history. The book contains "hand-written psalms in Latin, with Celtic and Pictish illustrations."

Crofter finds Norse anchor on Skye

A Scottish crofter working on a drain on the Isle of Skye was "stunned" to discover an anchor that is believed to date to Viking times. (photo)

12th century shipyard found on Skye

Boat timbers dating to 1100 have been discovered at Loch na h-Àirde, Scotland, leading experts to believe that the loch was "almost certainly the focus of crucial maritime work, whether boat building, repair and maintenance or as an inland harbour."

Pictish throne marks beginning of early Scottish research project

A throne, commissioned by distillers Glenmorangie and National Museums Scotland, and patterned after stone designs by the ancient picts, has become the symbol of a new research project to study Scotland's early history (photo)

New theories abound on Lewis Chessmen

David Caldwell of the National Museum of Scotland does not believe the recognized theory that the famous Chessmen of Lewis belonged to a merchant passing through Scotland. Caldwell thinks the owner was a noble who lived in the area, and that the pieces may not have been "chessmen" at all.

Antonine Wall: Scotland's hidden Roman treasure

When blogger Keir Roper-Caldbeck planned to bicycle the length of -- and report on -- Scotland's newest World Heritage site, the Antonine Wall, he thought it would be an easy task. That proved not to be the case. His blog of the journey is online.

Calling AAA: Mons Meg has a flat

Historic Scotland experts were called in recently to assess damage to Mons Meg, the historic cannon on the ramparts of Edinburgh Castle, which has a broken wheel.

Metal detector finds UK£1m torcs

Metal detector enthusiast David Booth was "stunned" to learn that four Iron Age gold torcs, dating to late Roman times, could bring him over UK£1m. The torcs were discovered in September 2009 in Stirlingshire, Scotland. (photo & video)

Controversial Wallace statue returned to creator

For more than ten years, a 13-foot, sandstone statue of William Wallace held a place of honor at the Wallace Monument in Stirling, Scotland, but last year it was returned to sculptor Tom Church "to make way for a new visitor centre." (photo)

Experts assess condition of Scotland's cliff-bound Old Wick

An archaeologist and a stonemason recently risked life and limb to investigate the ruins of the Old Man of Wick, a 12th century Scottish castle believed to have been built by Harald Maddadsson, the Earl of Orkney. The castle is perched precariously on the edge of a cliff overlooking the sea.

13th century Perth Charter restored

The year-long project to restore the Royal Charter of the city of Perth, Scotland has been completed. The status of Royal Burgh was given to Perth in 1210 by King William the Lion of Scotland. (photo)

Travel Skotland at your own risk!

Medieval Scotland may not have been as welcoming to Norse travelers as one would think. According to a 13th century Viking travel guide, the country was "full of dangerous natives who speak an incomprehensible language and the is weather awful." The 13th century chronicle warned Icelandic merchants away from the area.

Scottish Archaeology Month celebrates pirates

Two Scottish pirates, executed in Aberdeen in 1597, were the subject of the recent Scottish Archaeology Month. The stories of Robert Laird and John Jackson were to be told as part of the re-enactment Tales from the Tolbooth.

G.I. Joe goes regimental

Have you ever wanted to learn to wrap a great kilt? Or... do you have a G.I. Joe action figure in need of Scottish garb? If the answer to either of these questions is yes, you'll want to visit the Fabrics of Time and Space website for a tutorial.

Paisley loo is archaeologists' dream

“What’s unusual is that it hasn’t been messed with. This is a loo that hasn’t been flushed for 500 years. We have a kind of sealed environment, containing artefacts like the earliest known piece of Scottish music, which we found scratched into pieces of slate," said archaeology professor Steven Driscoll of the recent excavation of a 15th century Scottish sanitation drain.