Scottish

Scottish

[OUT] Caerthe 12th Night

Start the new year in Scotland and Ireland! This year Caerthe’s premiere event will highlight both the Scottish and Irish people, but you will also be able to come and enjoy all the aspects of Caerthe’s 12th Night that you have come to love over the years including merchants, friends, entertainment, and good tidings on the new year.

Trade between Romans and Picts verified in Scotland

An archaeological team from the Strathearn Environs and Royal Forteviot (SERF) project has proven the existance of trade between the Romans and the Picts with the discovery of an Iron Age broch containing trade items.

Remains of 12th century tolbooth found in St. Andrews

In 12th century Scotland, the "tolbooth or praetorium was the office from which the provost and baillies organised the running of the newly-created burgh." Now archaeologists believe they have found the remains of the tolbooth in St. Andrews.

Arthur's roundtable at King's Knot, Scotland?

Archaeologists at King's Knot in Stirling, Scotland have discovered a "circular feature" that some believe might be the fabled round table of King Arthur.

Medieval Mayhem at Scotland's Caerlaverock Castle

The walls of Caerlaverock Castle near Dumfries, Scotland rang with the sound of sword on shield recently when Historic Scotland presented Medieval Mayhem. A slideshow of photos by Gareth Easton is available from the BBC.

Reivers ride for charity

During the Middle Ages, the Border Reivers rode the lands between England and Scotland, stealing livestock and wreaking havoc with ruthless abandon. Now, their modern versions are riding to raise money for wounded British soldiers.

700th anniversary of Battle of Bannockburn to be marked with a celebration

Stirling, Scotland is gearing up to commemorate the 700th anniversary of the Battle of Bannockburn, which saw Robert the Bruce's victory over the English on 24 June 1314.

Pict Persona

Looking for any information on the Picts (who lived in northern Pre-Scottland) aside from Wikipedia. Theories on language are very welcome. :) Thank you.

Medieval Scotland determined to have had thriving pottery industry

A new study of 12th century monastic and castle sites in southern Scotland shows that the country's pottery industry was larger than previosuly believed, and it was much less dependent on foreign imports. (photo)

Scottish folklore collection available online

For the first time, the complete folklore collection of Alexander Carmichael has been published and is available to view online. Carmichael "spent 50 years collecting legends, songs, curses and oral history from Gaelic-speakers."

The humble green salad

The green salad goes back at least to the 14th century, when a complex mixture of herbs dressed with oil and vinegar is discussed in "The Forme of Cury". This article traces the history of rabbit food from that point forward in time.

Russell Crowe views living history in Scotland

Actor Russell Crowe brought his star power with him on a recent visit to Duncarron Fort, a replica medieval village in the Carron Valley, Scotland where he found the project "very impressive" and said it would be a version of "living history".

Violent trauma marks Stirling skeletons

The area near Stirling Castle in Scotland was a dangerous place in the 13th - 15th centuries. Evidence of this can be seen in the recent discovery of five skeletons buried at the castle which exhibit signs of having suffered "brutally violent" deaths.

Stirling restored

Those gentles making the journey to Scotland will want to include Stirling Castle on their itinerary. The castle is in the midst of being completely restored. BBC News has a slideshow of the results.

Scotland's King’s Knot to reveal its secrets

In the 14th century, poet John Barbour placed the site of King Arthur's "tabilll round" south of Stirling Castle in Scotland, a site believed to be King's Knot, a unique “cup and saucer” shaped mound. A new survey may reveal its mysterious secrets.

Prayer book and crucifix of Mary Queen of Scots reunited in Scotland

As she walked to the scaffold to be executed, Mary Queen of Scots carried an ornate crucifix and a Book of Hours. Now both artifacts, thought to have been carried by Mary, were reunited for a day at Loretto School in Musselburgh, East Lothian. (photo)

The ambitions of William Wallace

Dr Reuben Davies, from Glasgow University recently made a "startling" discovery in the Exchequer rolls for 1304-1305 of King Edward I: Scotland's Protector, William Wallace, "falsely sought to call himself King of Scotland".

[AET] Spring Thing

Long ago in the Barony of St. Swithin's Bog, upon a section of land once called the Western Border, a tradition began known as Spring Thing at which the Barony and all her family and friends gathered to dispel the winter's cobwebs and celebrate the return of Spring in a day of frivolous fun!

Scotland's Viking shipbuilders

Archaeologists are investigating a 12th century Norse shipbuilding site on the Isle of Skye, Scotland.  So far they have found boat timbers, a stone dock, and part of a man-made canal.

[EAS] Clan War & RISHF Demo

HRM King Lucan calls forth the mighty fighters of our great Eastern Kingdom to show their prowess on the field.

"Inscrutable" Lewis Chessman on display in Stornoway, Scotland

"The enigma of the Lewis Chessmen has intrigued and puzzled those who have viewed these inscrutable faces in the last 200 years or so," said Alex MacDonald, convener of Western Isles Council in Scotland about an exhibit of more than 30 of the game pieces.

Calling all Scottish brides!

Planning a Celtic wedding? Want to honor your Scottish heritage? You will want to consider a truly appropriate topper for your wedding cake!

Hjaltland Research Network to be established in the Shetlands

More Norse than Scottish, the Shetlands are poised to become a new mecca for the study of things Viking, where scholars plan to begin a new project entitled Mapping Viking Age Shetland.

Grants and donations will keep archaeological treasures in the UK

Grants from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the Art Fund charity, as well as public donations, will keep recent archaeological treasures in the United Kingdom. Funds of over UK£1 million will allow such items as a hoard of Roman coins and four gold Iron Age torcs to be acquired by local museums.

Bannockburn dig may have produced pottery owned by the army of Robert the Bruce

A recent excavation at Bannockburn, Scotland has uncovered several green-glazed pot sherds near the site of the camp of Scottish king Robert the Bruce, leading experts to speculate that the pottery may have belonged to the army.

"Senchus fer nAlban"

In the 7th century, seventy lines of text were created to record the number of men in western Scotland for the purpose of military service and tax collection. The Senchus fer nAlban (History of the men of Scotland) includes resources for the population of Dál Riata, the Kingdom of the Gaels on the west coast of Scotland. (photos)

Historical mistakes in "The Eagle"

In an article for the Guardian, culture reporter Charlotte Higgins explores mistakes made in the recent film, The Eagle, based on the book The Eagle of the Ninth, about the search for the lost legionary standard of the Roman Ninth Legion.

16th century defenses discovered at Stirling Castle

Renovation work for the gift shop at Scotland's historic Stirling Castle has unearthed the castle's 16th century defenses, which were built using the latest techniques around 1540. The defences were demolished during modernization in the 18th century.

Carved altar stones shed new light on Roman Scotland

Two elaborately carved altar stones have been unearthed in East Lothian, Scotland. The stones are dedicated to the Roman god Mithras and is the northernmost location that evidence of Mithraism has been found.

Smailholm Tower leaks to be stopped by turf roof

Historic Scotland plans to use medieval techniques to stop rain damage to a 15th century Scottish tower between St Boswells and Kelso. The landmark will be capped with a turf and clay roof.