Scottish

Scottish

Scots mercenary tradition

Since the Middle Ages, Scottish men have been involved in military pursuits, often on foreign soil. Fierce fighters, especially from the western islands, were particularly prized by the armies of Denmark, the Netherlands, Spain and France. Steven McKenzie of the BBC looks at their history.

A tour of the Border Abbeys

Planning a trip to Scotland? You may want to visit the four Border Abbeys, Melrose, Jedburgh, Dryburgh and Kelso, founded by King David I of Scotland in the 12th Century. A recent BBC article looks at the history of the religious sites in a troubled area. (photos)

Heraldic badge found at Scottish battlefield

A heraldic badge showing the Scottish crown has been found at the site of the Battle of Flodden. The badge may have been worn by someone closely affiliated with King James IV.

Suds or suds?

Archaeologists have long known that Vikings loved their ale, but, according to Merryn and Graham Dineley, the experts have seldom considered just where the ale was brewed. Now, a new study speculates that stone structures in Britain, once believed to be bathhouses, might actually have been brewhouses.

Red Comyn's pendant found in Scottish field

“It’s the find of a lifetime. I’ve been searching for historic gems for more than 30 years and found nothing like this.," said John Eldridge from North Berwick, who used a metal detector to find a 14th century harness pendant belonging to Sir John Comyn in a field near Loch Leven Castle in Scotland. (photo)

St Oran's Cross to return to Iona

St Oran's Cross, one of the world's oldest celtic crosses, will be restored and returned to Scotland's island of Iona in time to see the celebration of the 1450th anniversary of the arrival of St Columba. The 8th century cross weighs over a ton and will stand nearly 15 feet tall. (photo)

Macbeth, too, got a bad rap

The discovery of the remains of Richard III and the rethinking of his reign have caused some  to re-examine the image of another of Shakespeare's villains, Macbeth. Scots MSP Alex Johnstone is proposing such a study.

Another Knightly Skeleton Found in Car Park

The grave of a medieval warrior has been unearthed under a Scottish car park.   The site was originally that of a 13th-century monastery.

Economic crisis may have caused "hacked up" Roman silver

In 1919, archaeologists discovered a hoard of Roman silver at Traprain Law in East Lothian, Scotland composed of piles of "hacked up" Roman silver. They believed the late Roman period treasure was brought to Scotland as loot, but a new study by Dr Fraser Hunter shows that economics may have been the cause of the destruction of the dinnerware. (photo)

Medieval village found in Scotland

A previously unknown medieval village has been unearthed near Selkirk, Scotland.  The site was found during costruction of a water main.

The last Viking battle: "A war just waiting to happen"

In the 13th century, Scotland was divided between the Scots on the mainland and the Vikings of the western islands. The struggle that followed brought an end to Viking rule in the country. A  new BBC Two program looks at The Last Battle of the Vikings.

Roman-era tartan?

A tiny piece of cloak depicted in a Roman statue may be the "the first-ever depiction of tartan". The plaid appears on a bronze statue of the Emperor Caracalla with a bound Caledonian warrior wearing what appears to be tartan trews. The statue was found in the Moroccan city of Volubilis. (video)

Falkirk historian to team with Historic Scotland to promote Antonine Wall

In 2008, the Antonine Wall, which runs between the firths of the Forth and Clyde in Scotland, was added to UNESCO's World Heritage Sites. Now Historic Scotland hopes to team with citizens from the Falkirk district to promote the area as a tourist destination.

Scots celebrate rediscovery of David's Tower

For centuries, the 100 ft. (30.5 metre) tall David's Tower dominated the skyline of Edinburgh, Scotland until it was destroyed during the Lang Siege of 1573. Long forgotten, the demolished tower was rediscovered in 1912 and feted today, 100 years later. (video)

Concert based on Hawick Missal presented in Scotland

For the first time in nearly five centuries, the people of Scotland will listen to the music of 12th-century century monks from the recently discovered fragment of a missal for Holy Week. The performance will kick off a two-year music and arts project celebrating the creativity of Scotland. (photo)

[ATL] Feast of Saint Andrew

The Canton of Tear-Sea's Shore may lie in the Lowcountry, but, as winter nears, its heart turns towards the Highlands.  Once again, we invite to you to “Go Gael!” and join us at the Feast of Saint Andrew on the weekend before the winter solstice.   The site, the Colleton Saddle Club in Walterboro, South Carolina, opens at 10 a.m. and closes at 10 p.m. on Saturday, 15 December, 2012.

Flodden 1513 Ecomuseum to receive grant

The Flodden 1513 Ecomuseum project has received a grant of UK£900,000 to promote community archaeology and to "encourage dialogue about this historic battle and how it has impacted communities from both sides of the Borders."

Archaeologists ask for police help to uncover Bannockburn story

Stirling Council archaeologist Murray Cook has made an unusual request of the Central Scotland Police headquarters at Randolphfield, Stirling to allow experts to search the police grounds for evidence of the location of the Battle of Bannockburn.

Archaeologists find evidence from "one of the saddest hours in Scottish history"

An archaeology team in Stracathro, Scotland were working on a Roman fort when they discovered something very interesting: The possible ruins of the church where John Balliol abdicated his throne to Edward I in 1296.

Wind farm could save Lochindorb Castle

A 17-turbine wind farm could be the benefactor of a 14th century Scottish castle if a project proposal from Infinergy is successful. Lochindorb Castle, the home of Alexander Stewart, the Wolf of Badenoch, is owned by Cawdor Estates, a partner in the venture. (photo)

New book reveals Scotland's lost gardens

English spies in the employ of Henry VIII would never believe that their maps could lead to the re-discovery of forgotten and abandoned gardens in Scotland. Their maps, along with aerial photography, historic documents, and even poetry, were used by Marilyn Brown for her book Scotland's Lost Gardens.

New study shows Scotland "one of the most diverse nations on earth"

Conventional wisdom states that most of the Scottish population stems from Scots, Celtic, Viking and Irish ancestry, but a new DNA study shows something quite interesting. Many Scots carry genetics originating in West African, Arabian, south-east Asian and Siberia.

Another Saturday night with the Scots and Roman legions

Stracathro Fort near Stirling, Scotland, the world’s most northerly Roman fort, may have been served by a wine bar or pub. Archaeologists woring on the Roman Gas Project discovered a settlement adjacent to the fort including "a large square room – the equivalent of a public bar – and fronted on to a paved area, akin to a modern beer garden."

"People of Medieval Scotland" documents individuals from 1093 - 1314

Scotland's Education Secretary Mike Russell has launched a database charting life in medieval Scotland between 1093 and 1314 with software designed to be used in schools. The database was created at the University of Glasgow.

Nigg cross-slab removed for restoration

The Nigg cross-slab, an 8th century, intricately-carved Pictish stone from Easter Ross in Scotland, has been taken to Edinburgh for restoration work at a cost of UK£180,000. Upon completion of the restoration, the stone will be returned to display at Nigg Old Church. (photos)

"Significant" archaeological find revealed by Cowgate fire

In 2002, a devastating fire badly damaged the World Heritage site of Cowgate in Edinburgh's Old Town, but the clouds of smoke has a silver lining with the recent discovery of street frontages and tenements dating to the 16th century beneath the fire site.

"Exotic items from abroad" found at Norse site in Scotland

Archaeologists have discovered a wealth of artifacts dating from the late Iron Age through to the end of the Viking era on the west side of the island of South Uist in Scotland. Included among the artifacts was a piece of bone marked with an ogham inscription.

St Donnan's grave found on Eigg

St Donnan, who brought Christianity to Scotland's West Highlands, was killed by Viking riaders in the early 7th century. Now archaeologists from the University of Birmingham are investing remains found at Kildonnan Graveyard to ascertain if the body is that of the saint.

[EAL] Scotchtoberfest

Don your loudest Plaid and sew up your Landschneckt (But for the love of all things proper, please don't combine the two!) and come and join us for a day of fighting, fencing, A&S and excellent food. We hope to see you Saturday October 20, 2012.

Statutes of Iona impacted most aspects of Scottish life

In 1609, King James I for England tricked nine Scottish clan chiefs into captivity on the Island of Iona, where they were held until agreeing to submit to the Statutes of Iona, designed to break Scottish allegiance to their homeland and bolster British rule. Sarah Fraser of History Today has the story.