Scottish

Scottish

Hawks and hounds at Traquair medieval fayre

Traquair House, supposedly the oldest inhabited house in Scotland, was the site of the recent Traquair Medieval Fayre, complete with hawks, hounds and players. The BBC offers a short slideshow of the event.

But really, Puddledub?

Chief researcher for a new study of Scottish place names, Dr Simon Taylor, says: "Scotland is a country where many different languages have been spoken over the last 1,500 years, and its place names reflect this rich and varied history. What we are doing is giving teachers the tools to explore Scotland's rich heritage."

Wark Castle vanguard of Flodden 500 project

The Battle of Flodden, between the Scottish and English kings, took place in 1513. Now the battle is being commemorated by experts and volunteers for the Flodden 500 Archaeological project. The focus for 2014 will be Wark Castle on the Northumberland side of the River Tweed.

Bannockburn comes to the BBC

The BBC celebrates the anniversary of the Battle of Bannockburn with a two-program event, which premiered early in June 2014, entitled The Quest For Bannockburn. The program features Neil Oliver and Tony Pollard.

New books of poetry at Project Gutenberg

A text copy of all 3 volumes of Thomas Percy's Reliques of Ancient English Poetry was recently posted to Project Gutenberg. These books contain a great deal of poetry in middle and early modern English.

45,000 English surnames now in database

The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) funded Family Names of the United Kingdom Project has completed its first phase with 45,000 surnames, from the 11th to 19th centuries, researched and explained.

Cambuskenneth Abbey part of Bannockburn archaological study

The 700th anniversary of the Scottish victory at Bannockburn has brought together archaeologists and experts from a number of fields to study the battle. Among the sites investigated is Cambuskenneth Abbey near Stirling where Robert the Bruce held several of his early parliaments.

Blarney Stone mystery solved - by the Scots!

The origins of Ireland's Blarney Stone, famous for bestowing the "gift of gab" to anyone willing to kiss it, has been the subject of controversy for centuries. Now a team of scientists from the University of Glasgow's Hunterian Museum have found the answer using a 19th century rock sample.

Letters of Wallace and Robert the Bruce on display at Stirling Castle

700 years ago the fate of Scotland was being decided. Now, history buffs will be able to read the words of those concerned in the historic events at an exhibit of letters of Robert the Bruce, William Wallace, and others, at Stirling Castle. The exhibition runs until June 2014. (photo)

Murder declared in Scotland

An unidentified 20-year-old man has been found murdered in Kirk Ness in East Lothian, Scotland, but the murderer will not likely be found. The victim, fatally stabbed four times in the back, was killed in the 12th or 13th century.

"Oldest graffiti in Scotland" found in Mingary Castle

The builders of Mingary Castle on the Ardnamurchan peninsula in Scotland may have been illiterate, but they left their mark on history through their graffiti. The markings, discovered recently in the castle's chapel, were probably inscribed when the chapel was first built, between 1265 and 1295. (photo)

Wanted: Swordsmith apprentices for Edinburgh master-at-arms

Master-at-arms Paul Macdonald, of Macdonald Armouries in Edinburgh, Scotland, is looking for two apprentices. Qualifications include the ability to learn quickly and a passion for history.

Hobbyists score "biggest collection of medieval silver coins ever found using metal detectors in Scotland"

Gus Paterson and Derek McLennan of Ayrshire, Scotland have made their hobby of treasure hunting pay off. They recently discovered over 300 medieval silver coins, the biggest collection of medieval silver coins ever found using metal detectors in Scotland, in a field at Twynholm, near Kirkcudbright. (photos)

Symposium scheduled to pinpoint location of Battle of Brunanburh

In 937, a deciding battle was fought which changed the course of British history forever. The Battle of Brunanburh, one of the UK's bloodiest, was fought between the Scots and the Saxons, establishing England's identity. Unfortunately, no one knows where the battle took place.

"Organic lump" holds rare Celtic brooch

In 1891, the British Museum acquired a lump of organic material found at a Viking burial site in Lilleberge, Norway. The material had metal pieces in it, but no one took the time to examine it further - until recently when Curator Barry Ager took a second look and ordered the material x-rayed. (photo)

Scottish hillfort speaks of post-Roman unrest

A team of archaeologists from Rampart Scotland has discovered evidence of a post-Roman hillfort at Sheriffside, 20 miles to the east of Edinburgh, Scotland. Experts believe that the fort, and its 2.80m deep ditch, were constructed to defend against frequent raids by Scots and Picts against local tribes.

Antonine Wall to benefit from Historic Scotland 5-year plan

Central Scotland's Antonine Wall has never enjoyed the reputation as a tourist destination that its southern cousin, Hadrian’s Wall, has had, but a new 5-year plan proposed by Historic Scotland may change that fact. The development plan provides a "framework" for conservation and promotion.

Clan Macneil aids in restoration of Kisimul Castle

Members of Clan Macneil have joined forces with Historic Scotland to raise UK£200,000 for the restoration of Kisimul Castle in Barra. The 15th century fortress was the stronghold of the clan in the Western Isles.

Scottish Thing identified

Experts working on excavations at Dingwall's Cromartie Memorial car park have confirmed that the site was the location of an 11th century Thing, or Norse parliament. The structure may have been built at the instruction of Thorfinn the Mighty.

Scotland's Tapestry Project

Needleworkers in Scotland have created a very cool tapestry project, the world's largest, according to the BBC.

Scottish battle anniversaries focus of tourism industry

September 9, 2013 marked the 500th anniversary of the Battle of Flodden (the English won), while 2014 will be the 700th anniversary of the Battle of Bannockburn (the Scots took that one), two events destined to bring tourists flocking to Scotland and northern England. Sophie Campbell of The Telegraph has a feature story.

Ammunition tells of attack on Mingary Castle

Archaeologists excavating Mingary Castle in west Ardnamurchan, Scotland have recovered a musket ball and canonball in the moat of the castle, speaking of an attack sometime in its past. Mingary is considered to be "the best preserved 13th-century castle in Scotland."

Re-enactors "make history accessible and fun"

"Re-enactors are a strange breed, pretty eccentric but all with a passion for history, which I guess makes them my kind of people,” said archaeologist Dr Tony Pollard at the recent Celebration of the Centuries at Fort George, near Inverness, Scotland.

Medieval handbell re-created

Archaeologists know what early medieval handbells looked like from the "rusty shadows in the museum case" that still exist, but not what these bells sounded like. Now a team of experts from the National Museum of Scotland has re-created such a bell, "used by Scottish monks more than 1,000 years ago." (photo)

Archaeologists consider meaning of Mingary Castle arrowhead

Mingary Castle, overlooking the Sound of Mull in Scotland, may have had a more violent past than once believed, according to experts pondering the discovery of an iron arrowhead. (photo)

Archaeologists search for graves at Flodden

In September 1513, thousands of bodies were buried on or around the battlefield of Flodden in Northumberland, England. Now, 500 years later, excavation has taken place to locate and protect the remains and to declare the burials as war dead.

500th anniversary of the Battle of Flodden marked

14,000 individuals -- 10,000 Scots and 4,000 English -- lost their lives in the Battle of Flodden which took place in 1513 in Northumberland, England. Among them was King James IV of Scotland. This year re-enactors and others are marking the 500th anniversary of the history-changing battle. (photo)

Modelling Mary

The team who created the 3D face of Richard III, have now been comissioned to produce a virtual face of Mary, Queen of Scots as she would have looked in her 20s. The image is part of the new exhibition at the Scottish National Museum in Edinburgh. (photo)

Drum Castle's "chamber of secrets"

For centuries, a secret medieval chamber, complete with its own guarderobe, lay hidden behind the walls of Drum Castle near Banchory, Scotland, but now all has been revealed. The room appears to have been covered during later renovations. Drum, home of Clan Irvine, is Scotland's oldest castle.

Renaissance satire takes on Scottish independence

The Satire of the Three Estates by Sir David Lyndsay is considered Scotland's only surviving Renaissance play. Now the six-hour-long political satire is being performed at Linlithgow Palace in West Lothian. (video)