Irish

Irish

Forget Denmark! Hamlet's name was Irish!

Researchers have long traced the roots of Shakespeare's Hamlet, Prince of Denmark to Amlethus in the History of the Danes, written around 1200, but a new study traces the name back even further, to 8th or 9th century Ireland.

Luxury items more common in 16th century Ireland than previously believed

Common wisdom about 16th century Ireland, namely that it was a backwater, is being challeneged by a new study by PhD student Susan Flavin. She has looked at imports from England to Ireland between 1503 and 1600 and contradicts the common assumption.

Medieval Irish fishery victim of budget cuts

Archaeologists from the University College Dublin are unable to resume research on 14th century fishweirs near the Fergus Estuary in County Clare, Ireland which have been threatened by weather. The team blames budget cuts by the Irish Heritage Council. (photo)

Medieval Irish mill site yields surprising finds

Remnants of a medieval mill, including well preserved timber beams, pottery, and shoes, have been found  beneath Meeting House Square in Temple Bar, Dublin. The site was discovered during a routine pre-constuction survey, and they did not expect to find much of interest.

Irish stone crosses subject of thesis

In her 1991 Master's Thesis, The Role of the High Cross in Early Christian Ireland: 8th to 11th Centuries, Jill Quattlebaum discusses the early Christian Church in Ireland and the importance of the stone cross as its symbol. The thesis is available to read online.

9th century Viking fortress found in Ireland

Eamonn Kelly, Keeper of Antiquities with the National Museum of Ireland, reports that after years of research the Viking fortress of Linn Duachaill has been located 45 miles north of Dublin.

Irish "giants" more truth than myth

The myth of Irish giants such as Fionn Mac Cumhail may contain a grain of truth, according to a recent genetic study. DNA may show that a strain of gigantism ran through five families in the northern part of the country.

Did Scots beat Norse to Iceland?

New research by experts from Bangor University in Wales may show that the Vikings were not the first to reach Iceland. The first may have been Irish monks from the Scottish islands who travled there 70 years before their Nordic neighbors.

Cúchulainn film in production

The Celtic gods will get their day when the story of Cúchulainn, Ireland's greatest warrior, comes to movie theaters. The film will be part of a "multi-platform project planned to include a documentary series, stage show, educational programming and graphic novel."

Christmas in Ireland - Viking style

In an article for Irish America Magazine, Edythe Preet ponders Viking history and influences in Ireland, including linguistically and in the celebration of the holiday season, especially when it comes to food and drink.

Viking necklace found in cave a mystery

Archaeologists are puzzled over the spring 2010 discovery of a rare 9th century Viking necklace consisting of "71 glass beads covered with gold foil." The necklace was discovered during an excavation of Glencurran Cave in the Burren National Park. (photo)

Lost Viking settlement of Linn Duchaill may have been found

A team of archaeologists believes it has found Linn Duchaill, Ireland's lost Viking settlement, near the village of Annagassan, 70 kilometers north of Dublin. The outpost was mentioned in the Annals of Ulster, a 15th century account of medieval Ireland.

Faddan More Psalter most important Irish discovery since 19th century

The fragments of a vellum manuscript of a book of psalms dating to the 8th century has excited the archaeological community in Ireland who have called it the “most important day in the history of the museum since 1868 when the Ardagh Chalice came in."

Ancient bog road puzzles archaeologists

Archaeologists are trying to discover the exact purpose of an oak timber road found in the Bord na Móna bog in Tipperary, Ireland.

Skellig Michael fort may have pre-dated monastery

The precariously-perched UNESCO world heritage site Skellig Michael, in Kerry, Ireland, is known for housing monks from the 6th through 8th centuries, but new discoveries may prove that an earlier fort existed on the site.

[ANS] Shannon River Raids

With this missive does The Shire of Loch Ruadh invite you all to attend our new event, The Shannon River Raids, to be held October 22nd-24th in Hillsboro, Texas.

Hurling takes root in the USA

During practice, members of the Worcester Hurling Club hit a sliotar (ball) with their hurleys (stick). That's Worcester, Massachusetts, not England.

Irish discoveries give insight into Norman archery

The discovery of “bows and parts of bows, arrows and arrow fragments and an array of arrowheads” in an Irish bog dating to the Anglo-Norman invasion of Ireland may give insight into the types of equipment used by the Normans.

Early Christian brooch found in Irish turf

A zoomorphic penannular brooch dating to the 7th century has been discovered in a clump of turf cut for burning in Mantara, Ireland. The Brooch is believed to have belonged to an early Christian clergyman. (photos)

Medieval Irish abbots lived "life of O'Riley"

Ongoing excavations on the grounds of Rothe House in Kilkenny, Ireland, have discovered that Cistercian abbots, who had a previous residence at the site, lived a lavish lifestyle of roast swan and French wine.

11th century Viking house found in Dublin

Workers for the Office of Public Works (OPW) in Dublin, Ireland have unearthed evidence of an 11th century Viking settlement on the north shore of the Liffey River.

Graveyard reveals medical secrets of medieval Ireland

The history of medieval medicine in Ireland got a major boost with the discovery of a previously unknown medieval church and graveyard in Ballyhanna, County Donegal. Among the surprises was evidence of successful brain surgery performed around the year 800.

Annual edition of "Medieval Archaeology" released

Volume 53 of Medieval Archaeology: Journal of the Society for Medieval Archaeology has been released by Maney Publishing. The academic journal specializes in the medieval archaeology of Britain and Ireland.

Kells beauty "in the (crossed) eyes of the creators"

The intricate and precise artwork of the manuscripts of 7th and 8th century England and Ireland, including the Book of Kells, has amazed artists and scholars for centuries. Now paleontologist John Cisne believes he knows how it was done. (photo)

Dig shows Irish monks strove to be "green"

Archaeologists working on a dig at the Cistercian Bective Abbey in Co Meath, Ireland believe they have evidence of the country's first environmentalists. The abbey monks, dependent on handouts from their neighbors, worked hard to become as self sufficient as possible.

The things you find in bogs!

In an article for Wired Science, reporter Alexis Madriga ponders the sorts of things that have been found in peat bogs, including canoes, bodies, murder weapons and barrels of butter. (photos)

"Ring-pull on a Coke can" really medieval treasure

18-year-old Conor Sandford of Kilmore, Ireland believed he was picking up a soda can ring from the hole on his father's farm. What he actually found was a 12th century silver ring, "very well-preserved, and it was relatively unworn." (photo)

"The Secret of Kells" brings illumination to life

A 12-year-old boy fights off Vikings to help complete the Book of Kells in a new animated adventure from Cartoon Saloon. The film was scheduled for release late winter 2009.

Hebrides Scots linked to Irish invaders

A new DNA study may prove a 10th century historical source which states that the western islands of Scotland were invaded by the Irish in the early 6th century. The new evidence shows "a significant Irish genetics component in Scots' ancestry." The study may also prove that the invasions occurred earlier than the 6th century.

irish armor

I am needing help finding the style or armor the Irish wore in the 14th century. I am new to the SCA and I am trying to create armor for my persona so that I can start fighting. Any and all help will be appreciated. Thanks, Aengus