Irish

Irish

Best Irish Horse Harness Ever

A "virtually complete" horse harness of leather and metal pendants was brought to light from a well at Caherduggan in County Cork.

Sterling Silver Hand Crafted Celtc and Scandinavian Jewelry

Hand-crafted sterling silver Celtic and Scandinavian pieces. Many are recreations of museum pieces. The collection features Thor's Hammers and Odin's Raven.

Irish shipwreck the site of mystery and coconuts

A shipwreck found off the coast of Ireland carried an exotic cargo of Iberian pottery and coconuts. The coconuts, which likely sank in the late 16th or early 17th century, would mark the earliest known arrival of this fruit in Ireland.

Heart of St Laurence O'Toole stolen from Dublin cathedral

Police in Dublin, Ireland are puzzled by the theft of the heart of St Laurence O'Toole, a 12th century relic housed at Christ Church Cathedral. The heart, in a wooden box, was stolen March 2, 2012 when the protective metal bars were cut.

Reliving the Viking past in Dublin

Dublin's Viking past is everywhere in the city, from the Viking exhibition Dublinia to excavations at Dublin City Council headquarters. Join Catherine Le Nevez of Lonely Planet for a look at the city's Norse heritage.

Irish Myth presentation at Toledo, Ohio Museum of Art

"Irish Myth and the Sacred Landscape" is the title of a presentation being given at the Toledo, Ohio Museum of Art on April 20 at 7:30 pm. Admission is free.

Excerpts from "A history of Ireland in 100 objects"

In honor of St. Patrick's Day, here is a selection of some of the many medieval artifacts featured in The Irish Time's column A history of Ireland in 100 objects.

Irish Times reporter offers "A History of Ireland in 100 Objects "

Irish Times reporter Fintan O’Toole provides a history of his country one artifact at a time. In his A history of Ireland in 100 objects, O’Toole reports on one object, from the National Museum of Ireland, each Saturday and its significance in the history and culture of the country.

The economics of Viking raiding

For those who want to mix economics with blood and gore, Mary Valante has posted a paper presented at the Fourth Annual Appalachian Spring Conference in World History and Economics (2009).

Irish schoolgirl creates method to date ancient manuscripts

Sixteen-year-old Aoife Gregg of Loreto College, St Stephen’s Green, Ireland recently competed in a science competition. Her project: a computer letter frequency analysis of ancient Irish texts to demonstrate how the language has changed.

McParland’s, Parnell Street, Ireland's oldest timber-frame building

An unassuming building with an interesting chimney in Ennis, County Clare, Ireland, may be “potentially one of the most exciting urban archaeological discoveries in Ireland in recent years.” The building, currently under restoration, is believed to be Ireland’s earliest surviving example of a timber framed house. (photo)

Irish church bell could be world's oldest

A bronze bell from Derry, Ireland, in storage since the 1930s, may be the world's oldest existing church bell. The bell dates to 1411 and was probably made in France. Christian symbols on the bell lead researchers to believe it may have once belonged to a church or abbey.

Lost Newtown found in Ireland

Fifteen miles from modern Kilkenny, Ireland, a secret has been buried for centuries. That secret is the lost early Norman town of Newtown, now being decribed as "Kilkenny's Pompeii." LIDAR technology has disclosed the "streets, towns and dwellings" of the settlement.

Pierced skull leads to 1,000 year old murder mystery

As the saying goes, "Bows don't kill people, arrows do." Such seems to be the case for a burial in Galway, Ireland. Evidence of a shallow grave and an arrow found in the victim's skull has led researches to conclude that the man may have been murdered.

Viking settlement discovered beneath market square in Dublin

Arcaheologists have discovered the remains of a Viking settlement beneath Temple Bar, the cultural area of Dublin. Originally on an island, the settlement is believed to have been destroyed by floods in the 10th or 11th century. (photos)

Early Christian cemetery found in Ireland

A pre-Viking burial site dating to the 600s has been found near Dublin, Ireland. The site was discovered during construction for a power company project.

7th century burial site found in Fingal County, Ireland

Workers laying pipe for EirGrid were startled to discover human remains while excavating for underground power lines north of Dublin, Ireland. Tests revealed that the skeletons in the burial ground dated from between 617 to 675 CE.

Important Viking site in Ireland confirmed

Archaeologists working on the excavation of a Viking village in Louth County, Ireland are calling it "one of the most important Viking sites in the world." The site is believed to be where the Vikings brought their long ships for wintering and repair.

[ANS] Feast of St. Brigid - Candlemas 2012

Celebrate the feast of St. Brigid in an Irish manor house. While attending some of the finest arts and science classes view local artisans and talented bards as they vie for the prestigious title of Baronial Champion.

[OUT] Caerthe 12th Night

Start the new year in Scotland and Ireland! This year Caerthe’s premiere event will highlight both the Scottish and Irish people, but you will also be able to come and enjoy all the aspects of Caerthe’s 12th Night that you have come to love over the years including merchants, friends, entertainment, and good tidings on the new year.

Trinity College less than impressed with Dr. Barbarian's academic credentials

Trinity College of Dublin, Ireland has removed a web page in its professor profiles section belonging to one “Dr. Conan T. Barbarian, B.A. (Cimmeria) Ph.D. (UCD). F.T.C.D. (Long Room Hub Associate Professor in Hyborian Studies and Tyrant Slaying).”

Irish Central's list of 10 most popular Irish surnames

The website Irish Central has posted a list of the 10 most popular Irish last names, including meaning of the name, variations, and the area where the name is most prominent.

Remains of Irish beauty discovered at Dungannon

Archaeologists working on a dig at Dungannon, Ireland's Castle Hill have discovered what experts believe are the remains of Mabel Bagenal, third wife of the Earl of Tyrone, Hugh O'Neill, and known as Ireland's "Helen of Troy."

Fadden More Psalter on display in Dublin

In 2006, a group of turf cutters working in a bog in Tipperary discovered a vellum and leather psalter dating to the 9th century. Now, for the first time, the public will have the opportunity to see the Fadden More Psalter now on display at the National Museum in Dublin.

Spanish documents describe Irish settlement in South Carolina

Early 16th century Spanish explorers in North America reported the existance of a settlement in modern-day South Carolina of people with "red to brown hair, tan skin and gray eyes." The settlement was called Duhare.

Bog begets barrel of butter

Workers extracting turf from a bog in Galway, Ireland have found a wooden keg full of butter. The butter could be as much as 2,500 years old.

Want the severed head of a medieval saint? Act now while supplies last!

The (alleged) severed head of St. Vitalis of Assisi, a 14th century Italian monk, is being put up for auction in Ireland. The relic has been owned by a prominent Irish family since the 18th century.

Irish archaeologists excited over discovery of medieval mill

Researchers working beneath Meeting House Square in Temple Bar, Dublin, have found what appears to be a medieval grain mill. "This find is very exciting. We’re really buzzing about it,” said Dermot McLaughlin, chief executive of Temple Bar Cultural Trust.

Mysterious Irish brooch has link to Greece

In 2011, a woman cutting turf in a family bog at Tullahennell North, Ireland, discovered what proved to be a 7th century brooch bearing the Greek symbol for Christ. Now researchers have linked the pin to a Christian community with ties to Greece. (photo)

Forget Denmark! Hamlet's name was Irish!

Researchers have long traced the roots of Shakespeare's Hamlet, Prince of Denmark to Amlethus in the History of the Danes, written around 1200, but a new study traces the name back even further, to 8th or 9th century Ireland.