New World

Incan, Aztec, Native American, and other cultures native to the New World, as well as those cultures imported by colonists during the Medieval and Renaissance period.

Following the path of our Scotch-Irish ancestors

"Growing up in North Carolina, I always knew we had a huge group of Scotch-Irish settlers in the Piedmont of the Carolinas, but I didn't understand their ancestry. Were they from Scotland or Ireland?" Jennifer Hudson Taylor looks for an answer on her blog.

Waldseemueller map a mystery

Scholars are still puzzled by 16h century map created by German cartographer Martin Waldseemueller which depicts a vast ocean west of the Americas years before its discovery by Vasco Núñez de Balboa.

Archaeologist re-creates ancient booze

Patrick McGovern, a molecular archaeologist at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, does not hesitate to chat about the history of alcoholic beverages, and has even re-created a "9,000-year-old Chinese drink we call Jiahu."

Jewelry finds help illustrate history of Jamestown

The recent discoveries of a small pendant depicting a Virginia native American, and several other pieces of jewelry, will help historians understand more fully the history and life in the Jamestown colony.

Vikings not driven from Canada by the Thule

New research shows that Viking settlers in Newfoundland were not driven from the country by the native Thule, a native ancestor of the Inuits. Scientific re-dating has placed the native tribes in the area 150 years after the Viking settlements.

From the halls of Montezuma

Mexican archaeologists believe they have, at long last, found the fabled palace of Aztec emperor Montezuma, destroyed by the conquistador Hernando Cortés in 1521.

A tour of "remarkable Viking sites"

Jeff Lukovich takes visitors on a unique tour of Newfoundland's Viking sites in an article for

Search continues for "Lost Colony"

Researchers from the First Colony Foundation are gearing up to begin an extensive search for America's "Lost Colony." The project will be covered by the Time Team America program.

Alabama Welsh Society calls for the return of Madoc's historic marker

The Alabama Welsh Society wants a plaque reinstated marking the supposed arrival of Prince Madoc ap Owain in the U.S. three centuries before Columbus. The legend has it their two ships dropped anchor at what is now Mobile Bay, Alabama, in 1169 or 1170.

1600 volcano affected world climate

UC Davis geology professor Ken Verosub believes that a volcano which erupted in 1600 in Peru may have affected global weather, causing famine in Russia and a late wine harvest in France.

Canada's Red Bay Project proves Basque whalers visited Labrador in the 16th century

A new report by the Canadian government gives a detailed picture of Basque whaling and shipbuilding in 16th century Red Bay, Labrador. The report discusses artifacts discovered on the San Juan, a galeon sunk in 1565 and recently excavated.

Costuming sets the mood of historical films

An article by David Ansen in the March 6 Newsweek Magazine on the latest costume dramas deals with the HBO mini-series John Adams and how costume sets the mood for a project.

Columbus may have spread "social disease"

A new study claims that explorer Christopher Columbus may have been responsible for bringing syphilis to Europe. The controversial theory has been debated for years, but the new study of molecular genetics may show whether the theory is true.

Archaeologists explore 450 year old shipwreck off Florida

Archaeologists are studying the buried remains of a ship from a Spanish colonization fleet led by Don Tristan de Luna.

Archaeologists seek early Spanish evidence in Georgia

Archaeologists working on a dig in southern Telfair County, Georgia, believed they were looking for a 17th century Spanish mission. Instead they found something even more interesting: evidence of Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto's 1540 travels through the state.

Plimoth Plantation embroidery blog

A daily blog by members of the Plimoth Plantation's (Massachusetts) embroiders' guild shares notes and progress on a variety of early 17th century projects including the current one: an embroidered jacket.

The Nina tours the southern U.S.

The Nina, "the Most Historically Accurate Replica of a Columbus Ship Ever Built," will be touring the southern United States during November and December 2007. Tours are available.

16th century Spanish ship found off Florida coast

Divers are examining the remains of a ship which sank off the coast of Pensacola, Florida during a hurricane in 1559. The ship is believed to be one of several Spanish ships sent to colonize the area. A previous ship was discovered 15 years ago.

Modern technology may help to locate "Lost Colony"

Researchers such as George Ray hope that hard work and Google Maps may yet discover the fate of settlers of the "Lost Colony" of Roanoke in North Carolina, abandoned in the late 1500's.

Fire destroys "Lost Colony" costumes

A fire recently destroyed the section of the Waterside Theatre in Roanoke Island, North Carolina which housed historic costumes in the Irene Rains Costume Shop. Most of the costumes for Paul Green's play, the Lost Colony, were destroyed.

DeSoto's Florida camp found

Archaeologists are studying what they believe are the remnants of conquistador Hernando de Soto's camp in Tallahasse, Florida abandoned in 1540. The site is near the modern state capitol.

Earliest gunshot victim found in Peru

The skull of what is believed to be the earliest gunshot victim in the western hemisphere has been discovered near Lima, Peru.

Early Mexicans liked spicy food

Science Daily reports that chili peppers dating from between 490 and 780 C.E. have been discovered in a cave in Oaxaca Mexico. Experts believe that the plants were cultivated and used in early Mexican cuisine.

An Inca in Sarpsborg

Archaeologists in Oestfold, Norway are trying to understand how an Inca Indian came to be buried in the Norwegian city in the 11th century.

"Lost" Roanoke settlers could be identified by DNA

Historians are hoping that science will help discover the fate of the settlers of Virginia's lost Roanoke colony. Using DNA and genealogy sources, they they hope to trace the genetics of those who might have survived.

Battle of Mauvilla site found

Archaeologist Andrew Holmes believes he has discovered the site of the Indian town of Mauvilla where Spanish explorer Hernando De Soto engaged local Indians in a massive battle. The town is near the forks of the Alabama and Tombigbee rivers in southern Clarke County, Alabama.

John Smith, mapmaker

Among his many talents, explorer and early Jamestown resident Captain John Smith could count mapmaking. A map created by Smith in 1608 of the Chesapeake Bay river system has been compared recently with modern maps and found to have a "stunning level of accuracy."

Yurts invade Canada

The Muhlberger's Early History website has a story about how yurts are now being manufactured and sold throughout Canada as cheap housing. (Photo)

Exhibit of 16th & 17th century art celebrates 400th anniversary of Jamestown

"Rule Britannia: Art, Royalty, & Power in the Age of Jamestown" -- featuring the "Armada" portrait of Queen Elizabeth I, never before been exhibited in the U.S. -- will be on display at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, through August 12.

Exhibit on New World maps now on display at the Chrysler

"Envisioning Virginia 1587-1784: Early Maps of the New World" will be on display at the Chrysler Museum of Art, in Norfolk, Virginia, through August 12.