New World

Incan, Aztec, Native American, and other cultures native to the New World, as well as those cultures imported by colonists during the Medieval and Renaissance period.

Molinillo discovery proves use of chocolate in 16th century St. Augustine

The discovery of a molinillo, a stick used to mix chocolate, in a well in St. Augustine, Florida leads experts to believe that chocolate was enjoyed in the 1500s in the city.

1602 map shows China at the center of the world

In 1602, when he created the first Chinese map to name the Americas, Matteo Ricci was a Jesuit missionary living in Bejing. His map is currently on display at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. (photo)

Building It Medieval-The Ozark Medieval Fortress in Arkansas

Most of us have dreamed of building a castle, but these people are actually doing it. Starting in the spring of 2010 the Ozark Medieval Fortress is open.

Lost settlement of Argall Towne found

Alain Outlaw of Archaeological & Cultural Solutions, has been looking for Argall Towne since 1975. The elusive, short-lived settlement was started in 1617 near Jamestown, Virginia, by Capt. Samuel Argall, best known for kidnapping Pocahontas in 1613.

Canadians to search for New World's oldest church

Experts from the Newfoundland and Labrador archaeological communities are making plans to begin a search for a 510-year-old church on the western shore of Conception Bay, thought to be North America's earliest Christian settlement.

Lost William Weston letter documents English exploration of North America

Experts at England's Bristol University are excited by the discovery of a "long-lost" letter written by King Henry VII which references the voyage of merchant William Weston to the new World in 1499. (photo)

Native map chronicles history of post-conquest peoples

Scholars are actively studying a mid-16th century map painted on amate paper made from tree bark which "tells sacred stories and speaks of pilgrimages, wars, medicine, plants, marriages, rituals and heroes of the Cuauhtinchan community," the Mexican people of modern Southwest U.S.

Death of Henry Hudson still a mystery

Explorer Henry Hudson died in 1611. That much is known, but the circumstances of his death are still a mystery. Could it have been murder?

Danish expert declares Vinland Map genuine

For years, experts have disputed the legitimacy of the Vinland Map, the famous 15th century map which depicted parts of North America many years before its discovery by Christopher Columbus. Now Rene Larsen, rector of the School of Conservation under the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, has declared the map genuine.

Incan success at Machu Picchu may have been related to Medieval Warm Period

An article published in the "Climate of the Past Discussions", a discussion group of the European Geosciences Union, concludes that "a period of sustained aridity that began from AD 880, followed by increased warming from AD 1100 that lasted beyond the arrival of the Spanish in AD 1532" was partially responsible for the success of the Inca civilization during that period.

Connecticut's 5th Century Christian Church

A researcher believes a site in Connecticut is an early Christian church, built by Byzantine monks who fled from North Africa during the 5th Century, in the wake of the Vandal invasions.

"A minion of the finest sorte"

Experts at the site of colonial Jamestown are trying to puzzle out the inscriptions on a slate tablet found at the bottom of the town's first well. Among drawings and other markings, the tablet is inscribed with the words "A minion of the finest sorte." (photo)

New Norse settlement found in Canada

Canadian archaeologists are thrilled by the discovery of the remains of a medieval structure, which they believe may be Norse in origin, near Nunavut on southern Baffin Island. If true, this will be only the second Viking structure found in the New World.

Mysteries of Moctezuma revealed at the British Museum

In the last exhibit of a series on emperors, the British Museum will present Moctezuma: Aztec Ruler which reveals elements of the mysterious life of the last emperor of the Aztecs. The exhibition will run 24 September 2009 to 24 January 2010. (photos)

Huge cache of 17th century beads found in Georgia

A recently discovered large collection of glass beads dating to the 17th century proves that global trade had reached the shores of North America. The 70,000 beads, which included Venetian, Dutch, French and Chinese glass beads, were found at an excavation at the Santa Catalina de Guale Mission. (photo)

New York celebrates Henry Hudson's discovery of New Amsterdam

In commemoration of the Henry Hudson's 400th discovery of the City of New Amsterdam, the Museum of the City of New York will present “Amsterdam/New Amsterdam: The Worlds of Henry Hudson,” an exhibition of 275 artifacts housed in a replica of the hull of Henry's triple-masted ship. The exhibit runs through September 2009.

"Severed Ways" explores Viking discovery of America

Severed Ways: The Norse Discovery of America, a 2007 film written and directed by Tony Stone, tells the story of two Norsemen stranded in North America in the year 1007 who are forced to survive by their wits.

America's oldest free library may close

Out of our time period, but a sad commentary on the financial crisis in the United States: Delaware County's Darby Free Library (Pennsylvania) is one of eleven libraries destined to close their doors due to lack of funding. The library "is believed to be the oldest continuously operating public library in America."

Chocolate dated to 1000 CE in North America

Chocolate was drunk in North America as early as 1000 C.E., according to an article posted at LiveScience magazine online. The article describes cacoa residue found inside carved cylinder tubes in northern New Mexico.

"Murder" at the re-enactment

A fall 2008 Civil War re-enactment in Virginia went terribly wrong when a Yankee cavalryman from New York was shot and wounded by a .44-caliber ball from an 1860 Army Colt pistol.

Chocolate residue found in ancient pottery remains

Residue from a chemical only known in chocolate has been found on pottery shards dating back to between 1400 to 900 BC in Central America, according to an article at LiveScience magazine online.

ELAD'S Leather Armor

ELAD's provides handcrafted, leather armor for LARP, SCA, Renaissance and Medieval Festivals. They offer a wide selection of breastplates, helmets, bracers, gauntlets, spaulders, greaves, and more. Custom leather armor design is available as well.

American reforestation may have led to "Little Ice Age"

A new study by Stanford University researchers suggests that the reforestation of areas in the Americas following the collapse of pre-Columbian population centers may have triggered the Little Ice Age which occurred from 1500 to 1750.

Following the path of our Scotch-Irish ancestors

"Growing up in North Carolina, I always knew we had a huge group of Scotch-Irish settlers in the Piedmont of the Carolinas, but I didn't understand their ancestry. Were they from Scotland or Ireland?" Jennifer Hudson Taylor looks for an answer on her blog.

Waldseemueller map a mystery

Scholars are still puzzled by 16h century map created by German cartographer Martin Waldseemueller which depicts a vast ocean west of the Americas years before its discovery by Vasco Núñez de Balboa.

Archaeologist re-creates ancient booze

Patrick McGovern, a molecular archaeologist at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, does not hesitate to chat about the history of alcoholic beverages, and has even re-created a "9,000-year-old Chinese drink we call Jiahu."

Jewelry finds help illustrate history of Jamestown

The recent discoveries of a small pendant depicting a Virginia native American, and several other pieces of jewelry, will help historians understand more fully the history and life in the Jamestown colony.

Vikings not driven from Canada by the Thule

New research shows that Viking settlers in Newfoundland were not driven from the country by the native Thule, a native ancestor of the Inuits. Scientific re-dating has placed the native tribes in the area 150 years after the Viking settlements.

From the halls of Montezuma

Mexican archaeologists believe they have, at long last, found the fabled palace of Aztec emperor Montezuma, destroyed by the conquistador Hernando Cortés in 1521.

A tour of "remarkable Viking sites"

Jeff Lukovich takes visitors on a unique tour of Newfoundland's Viking sites in an article for Canada.com.