New World

Incan, Aztec, Native American, and other cultures native to the New World, as well as those cultures imported by colonists during the Medieval and Renaissance period.

Coin composition tells story of Europe's Price Revolution

Anne-Marie Desaulty believes coins can tell a story. She and colleagues from the University of Lyon are using mass spectrometry to study isotopes of lead and copper found in coins of the 16th and 17th centuries in hopes of discovering the cause of the great Price Revolution.

Cooling climate may have forced Vikings out of Greenland

Researchers have added "climate change" to the list of possible reasons that the Vikings suddenly abandoned Greenland around 1400. Analysis of  lake sediment cores has revealed that there was a sharp cooling trend from about 1100 onwards.

Vote for the castle!

Fans of the Ozark Medieval Fortress, or fans of castles in general, may wish to help make the site the best attraction in Arkansas by voting online. Voting ends June 8, 2011

Wasaga under Siege

Just a quick reminder that Wasaga under Siege “A War of 1812 Experience” is approaching fast.  

Vinland the Good

A short documentary, entitled The Vinland Mystery, looks at the search for the "only known Norse settlement in North America - Vinland the Good."

The Berry site: A Spanish "lost colony"

Did Spanish conquistadors first settle North Carolina? After discoveries in the 1980's along the Catawba River, where archaeologists found a Spanish fort, they just may have. The Berry Site is located near Morganton, North Carolina.

Huffington Post's overlooked wonders

Tired of the same, old tourist attractions? Huffington Post has some ideas for the Most Overlooked Historic Sites In The World in slideshow format.

Olde Worlde Colonial Products, LLC.

Olde Worlde Colonial Products is a purveyor of medieval and colonial outdoor lighting. Their core product is the Colonial Cressett which is handcrafted in wrought iron and designed to cast a warming glow at reenactment camp sites and homes alike. The Colonial Cressett may be spiked into the ground or used with an optional three legged stand also made of wrought iron.

Hunting and falconry law changes proposed in Virginia

Britton reports that Delegate Harvey Morgan of the Virginia legislature has proposed a change to laws affecting the practice of falconry and hunting with dogs.

Preserving historic manuscripts passion of Minnesota monks

Central Minnesota is the home of Hill Museum at St. John's Abbey, an unlikely site for the world's largest collection of historic religious manuscripts. Ray Suarez of PBS Newshour interviews Father Columba Stewart, director of the museum. (video)

Genetic links may show Vikings brought Americans to Iceland

According to new research, Viking explorers brought a Native American woman to Iceland in the 11th century, an act borne out by evidence of Native American genes in 80 modern Icelanders. Results of the study by Spain's Centre for Scientific Research will be published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology.

Pipes with personalized decoration found at Jamestown colony

400-year old smoking pipes bearing the names of their intended owners have been unearthed in Jamestown, Virginia (USA).

Wedding site of Pocahontas and John Rolfe located

Experts believe they have discovered the site of the church where Pocahontas married tobacco farmer John Rolfe in Jamestown, Virginia in 1614.

Modern world heraldy in Canada

Canadians who wish to own their own official heraldry may apply directly through the Canadian government rather than going through the British heraldy offices.

Artifacts tell story of early colonial life

The website Virtual Jamestown includes a gallery of photos of artifacts found at the Jamestown site. The gallery includes large images and rotating clips of each of the artifacts in the collection.

French Shore Tapestry Project

In 2006, volunteers from the French Shore Historical Society based in Conche, Newfoundland, Canada, and Christina and Jean Claude Roy began to document the history of their region with a Bayeux Tapestry-type embroidery project.

Archeologists discover trace of unknown Peruvian language

Archeologists digging at Magdalena de Cao Viejo in Peru have found a letter written in the eary 17th century by a Spanish colonist. On the back of the letter is a list of numbers written in Spanish, Arabic numerals, and an unknown language.

Monticello to host Historic Plants Symposium

On September 10, 2010, the Thomas Jefferson Visitor Center at Monticello will host the 2010 Historic Plants Symposium as part of the Heritage Harvest Festival at Monticello. The program will feature a dinner program “Come to Table,” Historic Plants in the American Kitchen" with  Rosalind Creasy.

2010 Heritage Harvest Festival at Monticello

This year's Fourth Annual Heritage Harvest Festival takes place Saturday, September 11, 2010 with a series of workshops, demonstrations, and presentations.

Mayan royal tomb found

The well-sealed tomb of a Mayan king has offered a treasure trove of new information for scholars. Archaeologists at El Zotz in Guatemala found the tomb in May, but kept their discovery secret until recently in an effort to protect the find from looters.

Florentine Codex gives insight into Mexican culture

During the New World plague of the 16th century, a group of artists and intellectuals barricaded themselves in the Colegio de Santa Cruz de Santiago Tlaltelolco to produced the Florentine Codex, a massive encyclopedia handwritten in three columns and two languages. The work has been restored and digitized.

Who really named America?

We all know the schoolboy version of the naming of the American continents: merchant explorer Amerigo Vespucci supposedly named the New World after himself. But a little-known proofreader and scholar named Matthias Ringmann may actually be responsible.

Archaeologists look for evidence of 1630s war in Connecticut

Researchers are scouring backyards in suburban Mystic, Connecticut, looking for remains of the Pequot War. They hope to use artifacts to help map the location of the battlefields.

Wasaga under Siege 2010

Wasaga under Siege – “A War of 1812 Experience” Nancy Island Historic Site, Wasaga Beach, Ontario, Canada July 23rd, 24th, 25th/2010

New insights into St. Augustine's central plaza

Archaeologists digging at the Plaza de la Constitucion in St. Augustine, Florida, are finding that the plaza is different than the plans authorized by the King of Spain in the late 1500's.

Aztec exhibition opens as archaeologists seek royal tomb

Archaeologists working on an excavation in downtown Mexico City think they are on the brink of discovering the first Aztec royal tomb ever found. Meanwhile, objects from the dig are on display at "Moctezuma II: Times and Destiny of a Ruler" at the Templo Mayor Museum.

Shell analysis confirms early Virginia accounts

An analysis of oyster shells thrown away by colonists in Jamestown, Virginia, indicates that historical accounts of a severe drought in 1611-1612 are correct. The shells show that the James River was much saltier during those years than in the present day, indicating lower rainfall.

El Niño may have caused famine in medieval Europe

A new study by a team of scientists from the University of Miami finds that El Niño and La Niña may have caused cooling in the central Pacific, leading to drought in medieval Europe.

Do you know a smile when you see one?

Early European explorers in the Caribbean islands commented on the "abominable" and "frightening" figures in the locals' art, with their bared teeth and "burning" eyes. But a new analysis suggests that the artists may have intended these expressions as inviting smiles rather than demonic grimaces.

"Indiana Jones" of brewing recreates ancient New World drink

When Patrick E. McGovern read an article about traces of an "unidentified beverage" being found inside 2800-year-old pottery vessels in Central America, he was inspired to collaborate with the author, anthropologist John Henderson, and eventually to recreate a brew made from cacao beans.