New World

Incan, Aztec, Native American, and other cultures native to the New World, as well as those cultures imported by colonists during the Medieval and Renaissance period.

Marco Polo in America

Most historian state that Christopher Columbus came to America in 1492, but new evidence, in the form of period parchments, may show that Marco Polo landed on the west coast nearly two centuries earlier.

Not the Santa Maria

Expectations were high recently when archaeologists believed they had found the wreck of the Santa Maria, Columbus' flagship off the coast of Haiti, but it was not to be. New evidence shows that the remains of the ship are from a later period.

Codex Chimalpahin to return to Mexico

The Museo Nacional de Antropologia in Mexico City is celebrating the return of the Codex Chimalpahin, a three-volume, hand-written, indigenous account vividly documenting the history of Aztec Mexico in Pre-Hispanic and 16th Century New Spain. Dan Colen of Art Daily has a feature story (photo)

Wasaga under Siege coming to Ontario in August, 2014

Wasaga under Siege 2014 & the 200th Commemoration of Battle of Nottawasaga Bay and the Sinking of HMS Nancy, August 14th-17th 2014.

Santa Maria found?

“All the geographical, underwater topography and archaeological evidence strongly suggests that this wreck is Columbus’ famous flagship, the Santa Maria,” said underwater archaeologist Barry Clifford about the discovery of what may be the Santa Maria, Christopher Columbus' flagship off the coast of Haiti.

Disappearance of Roanoke Island settlers "closer" to being solved

In 1587, settlers from England arrived in what is now North Carolina to establish a colony at Roanoke Island. By 1590 they were gone. What happened to the colony has long been a mystery for historians, but experts are now getting "closer" to finding out what happened to the lost colony. Tanya Basu of National Geographic has the feature story.

Abu Raihan al-Biruni and the discovery of America

In a feature article for History Today, S. Frederick Starr of the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University, looks at the claimants to the discovery of the New World, including Abu Raihan al-Biruni, an Islamic scholar from Central Asia, who "may have discovered the New World centuries before Columbus – without leaving his study."

Spanish fort in Appalachian Mountains

A team of archaeologists has discovered a Spanish fort built in the foothills of North Carolina's Appalachian Mountains by Spanish Captain Juan Pardo in 1567, nearly 40 years before Jamestown. Fort San Juan is now considered the earliest European fort constructed in the interior of the United States.

Introducing Hernán Cortés

Arguably, Hernán Cortés is the most famous - or infamous - of the Spanish explorers. Jessie Szalay, LiveScience Contributor, offers a biographical feature on the conqueror of the Aztec Empire and governor of New Spain.

Viking voyages to southern Newfoundland proved

"Provocative" new evidence shows that Vikings may have sailed south from their settlement in northern Newfoundland to Notre Dame Bay, where they may have encountered native inhabitants of the island.

Five Winds Trading Company

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Climate change threatens Jamestown

Venice may not be the only historic city threatened by rising ocean waters caused by climate change. Jamestown, the first successful English colony in America, may soon be under water. Christopher Joyce of  NPR's All Things Considered has the audio story. (photos)

Lost Cortés letter found

A letter from Charles V to Hernán Cortés, proclaiming him Governor of Mexico, has been found in the State Archive in Naples. The letter is one of the oldest sent to the New World.

Excavations underway at St. Augustine, Florida

In 1565, St. Augustine was founded and became the first continuously-occupied European settlement in what would later become the continental United States. For the past 37 years, archaeologist Dr. Kathy Deagan of the University of Florida has spent her summers excavating the area of the "Fountain of Youth" and learn more about the early Spanish settlement. (video)

New world duel may be the answer to colonial murder mystery

Excavations in 1996 at Jamestown, VA (USA) revealed that one of its earliest settlers died of a gunshot wound. Researchers now believe they have solved his murder. They believe the man was named George Harrison and that he was killed in a duel.

The history of smoking

“When they travel, have a kind of herb dried, who, with a cane and an earthen cup in the end, with fire and the dried herbs put together, do suck through the cane and the smoke thereof, which smoke satisfieth their hunger, and therewith they live four or five days without meat or drink,” writes John Sparke about native Floridians' use of tobacco, which was introduced to Europeans in 1564.

Wasaga under Siege and Sails on the St. Mary seek re-enactors

Building on the huge success of past Wasaga under Siege events, the Historic Military Establishment of Upper Canada in partnership with the Town of Wasaga Beach, Ontario Parks, Town of Collingwood and Nancy Island Historic Site look forward to hosting you once again from August 16th to the 18th, 2013.

Pondering Ponce de León

The State of Florida is celebrating its 500th birthday, including debates about the exploration of Juan Ponce de León, who landed on the peninsula on April 2, 1513. St. Augustine is the traditional site of the landing, but historian Douglas Peck believes otherwise.

Historical Glassworks- glassblowing

Historical Glassworks creates handblown glass articles, specializing in historical reproductions. Available items include tools, feast gear, accessories, and decorative gifts. They also offer live demonstrations. View their calendar for a list of upcoming events in your area.

Ghengis Khan found guilty of drug charges

A man named Genghis Khan of Brooklyn, NY was found guilty of felony drug posession. Prosecutors did not say if he would be charged with conspiracy to invade China.

Documents from St. Augustine, Florida shed light on life in the New World

The earliest documents relating to the city of St. Augustine, Florida (USA) are being digitized for preservation. The documents cover the time period from 1594 to 1763 CE.

1812 event seeking re-enactors

David J. Brunelle, Co-ordinator Historical Displays/Exhibits for Tall Ships 1812 in Midland and Penetanguishene Ontario is seeking re-enactors, artisans, entertainers, and historical displays for the event to be held August 24-25, 2013.

Roman bricks and cat prints bring mystery to Fort Vancouver

A grad student visiting Fort Vancouver, Washington (USA) in 1982 noticed some bricks at the fort that didn't look like the others. Analysis later revealed that these bricks were made in Roman England.

Inability to adapt not the cause of demise of the Vikings

One of the theories about the demise of Viking settlers on Greenland was that the Norse were unable to adapt to the island's harsh climate, but Danish and Canadian researchers believe that was not the cause.

Viking outpost on Baffin Island?

At a conference in October 2012, archaeologist Patricia Sutherland announced that new evidence has been found of a Viking outpost on Canada's Baffin Island.

US government determines Drake landed at Point Reyes, California

Apparently fed up with four centuries of sqabbling, US Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar has designated the Point Reyes Peninsula, north of San Francisco, in Marin County, California, as the site where Sir Francis Drake came ashore and claimed the land for England.

The ongoing importance of the Magna Carta

In Great Britain and the United States, the Magna Carta is revered as one of the bases of law. In an article for History Today, Ralph V. Turner, Professor of History Emeritus, Florida State University, and the author of Magna Carta, looks at the document and its importance through history.

Possible second New World Viking site discovered on Baffin Island

Artifacts from an excavation on Baffin Island, Canada have yielded evidence that the Vikings may have had a settlement there in the 14th century. Evidence includes traces of bronze, European-style stonework and tools, Old World rat pelts, and yarn similar to that made in Greenland at the same time.

14th century English coin found in southern Maine

A woman walking along the shore of the Neddick River in southern Maine (USA) came acorss an unusual find - a 14th century penny, likely minted in Canturbury, England.

Spanish Inquisition follows priest to the New World

According to trial records, Catholic priest Pedro Ruiz Calderón not only practiced Black Magic, but he was really good at it. The trial took place as part of the Spanish Inquisition in Mexico City in 1540.