1501 CE to 1600 CE

Pennsic documentary producer to make video of USA Knights at IMCF world championships

Zorikh Lequidre, known in the SCA as Lord Ervald the Optimistic, is set to make a video documentary of USA Knights, America's original full-combat armored combat team, at the International Medieval Combat Federation world championships this Spring in Malbork Poland. The new video is to be titled “American Knights.”

Historical women's letters auctioned in Paris

The auction of around 1500 letters of famous women, including Catherine of Aragon's plea to Pope Clement VII to block her divorce from Henry VIII, took place in November 2014 in Paris. The auction, whose book was entitled Women: Letters and Signed Manuscripts, brought a total of EU 794,173. (photo)

Henry VIII graces stages in New York and New Jersey

Henry VIII and his wives will be on the minds of New Yorkers as two very different productions have been scheduled: King Henry VIII at the Shakespeare Theater of New Jersey (Fall 2014) and Wolf Hall: Parts 1 & 2 by the Royal Shakespeare Company (Spring 2015). The latter is an adaption of the books by Hilary Mantel. Michael Sommers of the New York Times has a review. (photos)

Metal detector hobbyist finds treasure in English fields

Treasure hunter Stephen Auker is a bit of a metal detector rock star. In recent years, he has discovered more than 100 Roman coins in a field near Silsden in northern England, offering them to a museum in Keighley. More recently, Auker found a merchant's signet ring dating to the 1550's. (photo)

"Battle, Bricks and Bridges" lead experts to the truth about the Battle of the Ford of the Biscuits

"Archaeology is an evolving process so you always learn more and more," said archaeologist Paul Logue from the Northern Ireland Environment Agency, about new discoveries on the 16th century Battle of the Ford of the Biscuits in County Fermanagh, Ireland.

Newcastle Museum to permanently display Lindisfarne Hoard

In 2003, Richard Mason, a builder from Rothbury, England discovery a pottery jug in the foundation of a Lindisfarne house. The jug, and its contents of gold and silver coins dating to Tudor times, will now be on permanent display at the Great North Museum: Hancock in Newcastle, thanks to public donations and heritage grants. (photo)

St. Augustine dig: "a 16th century jackpot!"

Archaeologists working at the site of a new garden at the gallery of the Art Association in St. Augustine, Florida, have unearthed "some of the earliest artifacts found in the downtown area." City archaeologist Carl Halbirt said, "This is a 16th century jackpot!" WFGA, Jacksonville, has the story. (video)

Lavenham seeks World Heritage status

According to Wikipedia, Lavenham, England "is a village and civil parish in Suffolk, England noted for its 15th-century church, half-timbered medieval cottages and circular walk." Now the town's business forum and parish council plan to apply to UNESCO for a World Heritage grant to "help balance tourism, the local economy and traffic." (photos)

Gagliana Grossa subject of study by Texas A&M students

In 1583, the merchant ship Gagliana Grossa sank off the coast of Biogradna Moru, in Croatia. Now the shipwreck has become a subject of study by a group of Texas A&M students led by Filipe Castro, in partnership with Irena Radic Rossi from the University of Zadar. (video)

Archaeologists to wrap up dig at Flodden

9 September, 2013 marked the 500th anniversary of the Battle of Flodden between the Scots and the British in the fields of Northumberland, England. In October 2014, excavations of the site will be terminated, ending several years of work. The latest dig will concentrate on the bridge at Ellemford, believed to be the muster site for the Scottish army.

Sistine Chapel visitors to be limited to 6 million per year

In order to protect its precious frescoes, the Vatican has announced that it will restrict visitors to the Sistine Chapel to 6 million each year. Experts say that dust, sweat and carbon dioxide from up to 20,000 tourists a day pose a major threat to Michelangelo’s masterpiece. (photos)

3D scanning used to study medieval teeth

Researchers from around the world may benefit from a study of the molars of 22 individuals unearthed during excavation of Periplatz cemetery in Berlin. The remains, dating from between 1200 to c.1600 CE, were analyzed using "3D printing technology to complement strontium isotope analysis in order to better understand the ancient residents of Berlin."

What lies beneath?

Museum conservationists never know what they might discovered under layers of paint and grime. What lies beneath the surface is the subject of a new display at London's National Portrait Gallery which reveals, for the first time, some of the conservationists' findings.

Codex Chimalpahin to return to Mexico

The Museo Nacional de Antropologia in Mexico City is celebrating the return of the Codex Chimalpahin, a three-volume, hand-written, indigenous account vividly documenting the history of Aztec Mexico in Pre-Hispanic and 16th Century New Spain. Dan Colen of Art Daily has a feature story (photo)

Dudley's tower opened to public at Kenilworth Castle

In the 1570s, Queen Elizabeth I's favorite, Robert Dudley, built a tower dedicated to her personal use onto Kenilworth Castle in Warwickshire. Now, for the first time, the tower rooms will be open to the public.

Dig to explore medieval town and plantation in Northern Ireland

Experts in Antrim County, Northern Ireland, are intrigued by evidence of a "lost" medieval town beneath a plantation-era Gaelic Scottish settlement and a 16th century castle. The evidence consists of a metal buckle and a silver groat, both dating to the 1550s.

Mary, Queen of Scots letter sells for US$28,000

On September 18, 2014, RR Auction, in Boston, Massachusetts, auctioned a private letter from Mary Queen of Scots transferring control of her property, Wassy Castle, located in eastern Champagne, France, to her maitre d'hotel, Jacques de la Montaigne. The letter was sold to a private bidder for US$28,750 (UK£17,472). (photo)

Novelist finds human remains in IKEA bags

Perhaps Swedish erotic novelist Kicki Karlén briefly considered changing her genre to mystery when she discovered the remains of 80 people, dating to the 16th century, stashed in large IKEA bags in a chapel in Kläckeberga in southern Sweden.

SCA Playwright's "To Each Their Own" released in audio production

Sir Brand deus Leons of An Tir wrote a Shakespearean-style comedic play, "To Each Their Own". The play, reviously published in script form, has been commercially produced and released in audio form.

Medieval invention still ticking

Since the early 16th century, watches have been an elegant fashion statement. David Thompson, former Curator of Horology for the British Museum, looks at the history of the watch in a feature  article on the British Museum blog. (photos)

Oral history leads to discovery of lost Polish church

As late as the 1930s, scholars knew that a late medieval church had once stood in the town of Suraż, Poland. Now archaeologists have verified the oral history with the discovery of remnants of the building.

Elizabeth's "pirate" ship raised from floor of the Thames

After 400 years, a ship, believed to be the Cherabin, will be celebrated once again in England. The "state pirate ship," sponsored by Queen Elizabeth I, has been raised from the floor of the Thames estuary to find a new home in the National Dive Centre in Stoney Cove, Leicestershire. (photos)

Mars reveals its secrets

In 1564, the Swedish warship Mars went up in flames, taking "800 to 900 Swedish and German sailors and a fortune in gold and silver coins to the bottom of the Baltic Sea." Jane J. Lee offers a feature on the "cursed" ship for National Geographic online. (photos)

Royal chapel found near Edinburgh

A team of archaeologists and volunteers have found evidence of a 16th century chapel, believed built by Sir Simon Preston in 1518 "to rest the souls of James III and IV. "

The search for Süleyman's heart

In the summer of 1566, the great Ottoman sultan Süleyman the Magnificent was on a hard-fought attempt to capture Vienna, but his dream was not to be. The great leader died in his campaign tent, and his heart was buried there. Now the ongoing quest to discover the burial site of the heart continues with Norbert Pap, a professor of political geography at the nearby University of Pécs.

Sackler Gallery presents Persian Calligraphy exhibit

The Sackler Gallery in Washington D.C. will present Nasta'liq: The Genius of Persian Calligraphy beginning September 13, 2014. The exhibit will showcase Persian calligraphy from the 14th-16th centuries.

Vlad rests in Italian soil?

New research may show that the remains of Count Vlad Tepes, a.k.a. Dracula, may not be buried in romania, but in Naples, Italy. scholars from the University of Tallinn believe they have found evidence that the nobleman was "taken prisoner, ransomed to his daughter - by then safe in Italy - and buried in a church in Naples."

Remains of Black Shuck found in ruins of Leiston Abbey?

An old legend in Suffolk, England, tells of a massive black dog, known as Black Shuck, which terrorized the village folk, and was the subject of a report in 1577 by the Reverend Abraham Fleming. Now archaeologists believe they have found the remains of a huge dog buried in the area. (photo)

Mystery of Wolsey's missing angels solved

Once upon a time, four bronze angels adorned the gateposts of the Wellingborough Golf Club in Northamptonshire, England. No one paid much attention to them until two were stolen, but now all four, identified as Renaissance treasures, are the subject of a fundraising effort by the Victoria and Albert Museum. (photo)

French museum hosts Shakespearean costume exhibit

The National Centre for Stage Costumes in Moulins, France is playing host to an elaborate display of Shakespearean theatrical costumes entitled Shakespeare, l'étoffe du monde. The silk, satin and gemstone-studded costumes reflect designs from over a century of productions.