1401 CE to 1500 CE

Embroidered textiles bring high prices at Bonham auction

On December 9, 2009, a collection of 15th-19th century works of art and textiles was auctioned by Bonham's Auction House. Detailed photos of the auctioned items are available to view on the website.

"1415: Henry V's Year of Glory" shows new Henry V

For centuries, Englishmen have revered King Henry V as "the greatest man that ever ruled England,” but 1415: Henry V's Year of Glory, a new book by Ian Mortimer gives a new view of the king. Dominic Sandbrook of The Telegraph has a review.

15th century vervel may have royal connection

A 15th century vervel, used to connect leather jesses attached to a hawk's legs to the bird's block, with a possible royal connection, has been found in Eaton Bray, England. (photo)

Da Vinci’s Workshop In Manhattan

Leonardo da Vinci’s Workshop, an exhibit at Discovery Times Square Exposition in New York City, brings the wonders of da Vinci's genius to life in the form of mechanical objects and interactive displays from the minds of Milan’s Leonardo3, “an innovative research center and media company” devoted to the scientist.

Archaeologists ponder "Secrets of Shangri-La"

Archaeologists believe they have found Shangra-La in the form of Himalayan caves holding wall paintings, illuminations and 15th century religious texts. (photos)

"Assassin's Creed II" takes players to Renaissance Italy

In 15th century Italy, a young nobleman finds himself betrayed by a rival family, and seeks vengeance against his enemies. The plot of an engaging new film or novel? No, it's the storyline for Assassin's Creed II, Ubisoft's top-selling video game set in the Renaissance.

War of Troy Tapestry returns to the V&A

Once a jewel of the Victoria and Albert Museum, the War of Troy Tapestry was removed from exhibit twenty years ago "when it became too damaged to display." Now, after 4,000 hours of restoration, the tapestry will once again take a place of honor in the museum. (photos)

Experts suggest alternate site for Battle of Bosworth

For nearly the 500 years since it took place, experts have disputed the location of the Battle of Bosworth which saw the defeat of Richard III. Now a team of historians and archaeologists believe they have found the site.

Calling AAA: Mons Meg has a flat

Historic Scotland experts were called in recently to assess damage to Mons Meg, the historic cannon on the ramparts of Edinburgh Castle, which has a broken wheel.

Agincourt redux

The Battle of Agincourt took place on St. Crispin’s Day, October 25, 1415, and the details of the victory of the English over the French has been debated since that time. In a recent article for the New York Times, James Glanz looks at the controversy which continues to this day.

Notes on Agincourt

Agincourt Computing has created a website chronicling the history and literature surrounding the Battle of Agincourt, the 1415 battle between the French and the English near Calais.

Desperately seeking Da Vinci

Scientist Maurizio Seracini believes there is s lost Da Vinci painting hidden inside a wall in Florence’s city hall, and he wants to use high tech techniques to find it. The Battle of Anghiari, the largest painting Leonardo ever undertook, was never completed, but was studied "as an unprecedented study of anatomy and motion."

Controversy surrounds Dracula's cellar

Archaeologists have discovered what they believe is the basement of ”Drakulya House,” owned by Vlad III Tepes, more commonly known as Dracula, in the Hungarian city of Pécs, but authorities plan to fill in the excavation for preservation purposes.

Land grudge brought about Bosworth treachery

Historians have long held that Richard III was killed at Bosworth field in retribution for his slaying of his nephews, the young, rightful heirs, but new evidence may show a different motive: a decade-old power struggle between Richard and William Stanley.

Lost William Weston letter documents English exploration of North America

Experts at England's Bristol University are excited by the discovery of a "long-lost" letter written by King Henry VII which references the voyage of merchant William Weston to the new World in 1499. (photo)

Volunteers find rare tiles at Woking Palace

More than 100 volunteers recently made an amazing find at Woking Palace, near Old Woking, England: rare tiles, crafted in Valencia, Spain in the late 15th century.

Photos from 15th century costuming exhibits at the Germanisches Nationalmuseu

Frau Anna Syveken reports that she has posted photos taken at the Germanisches Nationalmuseum in Nuremburg relating to 15th century costuming.

Facial hair of the Middle Ages

On her medieval history page, Karen Larsdatter shares research and links on beard styles of the Middle Ages -- from peasants to princes -- from 12th century to the 15th.

Database catalogs soldiers' records from Hundred Years War

A new web site provides searchable databases of the detailed service records of 250,000 medieval soldiers, including archers who served with Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt.

"Soldier in later Medieval England" online database

This web site, created by Dr. Adrian Bell of the ICMA Centre and Professor Anne Curry of the University of Southampton (UK) and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, catalogs all known service records for soldiers in the Hundred Years War between 1369 and 1453 CE.

Lost Knowledge: Timbrel vaulting

A look at the largely-lost Medieval art of timbrel vaulting structures and the related, more modern (late 19th century) system of interlocking terracotta tiles which create what are known as Guastavino domes, after their inventor, Rafael Guastavino.

En tableau: the First Defenestration of Prague

Can it really be the Defenestration of Prague if it's done with Legos? Apparently so, with the complete scene created in the plastic bricks on the Blockland website.

Incan success at Machu Picchu may have been related to Medieval Warm Period

An article published in the "Climate of the Past Discussions", a discussion group of the European Geosciences Union, concludes that "a period of sustained aridity that began from AD 880, followed by increased warming from AD 1100 that lasted beyond the arrival of the Spanish in AD 1532" was partially responsible for the success of the Inca civilization during that period.

Remains of a Stirling knight

Researchers believe that the skeleton of a young man found at Stirling Castle in Scotland may be those of a knight killed in battle in the early 15th century. The bones were discovered in the castle's chapel in 1997.

British mother and son find US$400,000 treasure

Years of metal detecting have paid off for Mary Hannaby and her son, Michael of Hemel Hempstead, England. The two recently discovered a piece of gold, believed to be part of a reliquary or pendant buried four inches below the surface of a field in Hertfordshire.

How to cook a porpoise

Richard II's recipe for cooking a porpoise is now available online. The recipe is included in a new digitized version of The Forme of Cury, the 15th century text long used by historians to re-create medieval recipes. (video)

Five medieval skeletons found in Mickleham

Construction work on a new vestry at St Michael's Church in Mickleham, England has led to the discovery of five graves dating from at least the 15th century, one belonging to a small child. The graves are believed to mark the location of the medieval churchyard.

Gutenberg Bible extract used as book binding

A library assistant in Colmar, France has discovered what is believed to be an extract from the Gutenberg Bible being used as part of the binding of another book.

"Naked Mona Lisa" sparks controversy

Long hidden behind a panel, a portrait of a semi-nude woman bears a striking resemblance to Leonard Da Vinci's famous Mona Lisa. The painting was once believed to have been done by the Da Vinci, but now experts feel that it may have been inspired by a lost masterpiece. (photo)

15th century Redbook?

While doing research on medieval romance tales, Canadian professor James Weldon made a fascinating discovery: the first women's magazine. The manuscript, known as Biblioteca Nazionale, produced on paper in 1457, is a fascinating collection of recipes and romances aimed at the female reader. (photo)