1401 CE to 1500 CE

1421: The Year China Discovered America?

A documentary, airing on Wednesday, July 21, on PBS, examines Zheng He, a legendary Chinese admiral, and the spectacular Ming fleet of treasure junks he commanded in the early 15th century

Da Vinci doodles brought to life: Leonardo's genius on display in hometown museum

The main attraction of the Leonardiano Museum, in Vinci, Italy, is a model of a self-propelled vehicle based on a drawing that Leonardo da Vinci created in 1478.

Vandal Damages Venetian Statues

A recent wave of vandalism, which Venetian mayor Paolo Costa has blamed on "an isolated lunatic," has resulted in damage to a column of the Doge's Palace at St. Mark's Square

New Study of Voynich Manuscript Finds it Gibberish

In an article in Scientific American, Gordon Rugg discusses recent findings about the infamous Voynich Manuscript, a mysterious document filled with arcane symbols.

Was There a 15th-Century "Little" Medieval Warm Period?

Editorial commentary from CO2 Science Magazine, the journal of the Center for the Study of Carbon Dioxide and Global Change, discussing the scientific evidence for "a major spike in surface air temperature that began sometime in the early 1400s."

Exhibit on 15th Century Manuscripts at the Getty

''Fit for a King: Courtly Manuscripts, 1380-1450'' will be on display at the Getty Center in Los Angeles, California, through August 29.

Winged Detectives Find Renaissance Fresco

A flock of pigeons has led a group of art historians to a lost Renaissance fresco hidden in the ceiling of a Valencia cathedral.

The Independent: The Care and Feeding of the Renaissance Horse

The British Library has recently acquired a 16-page pamphlet published by Wynkyn de Worde in 1497, the earliest known veterinary textbook printed in Britain.

Santa Maria's Bell Returned to Spain

The ship's bell from Columbus' flagship, the Santa Maria, has been returned to Spain after a legal dispute with Portugal.

New Book on the Inquisition Published

Germany was where more male and female "witches" were killed by civilian tribunals around the start of the 15th century, according to a new book on the Inquisition -- about 25,000 out of a population of 16 million -- but the book's editor says that fewer people were killed in the Inquisition than is commonly believed.

Introducing Leonardo da Vinci

In her weekly column, Aoife shares her annotated research links on the ultimate Renaissance man: Leonardo da Vinci.