1401 CE to 1500 CE

Discovery Channel: Michelangelo's David Not Perfect

Michelangelo's David, long thought to be the model of male perfection, is not as perfect as once believed. He is missing a back muscle.

Discovery Channel: Medici Murder Mystery Solved

The exhumation of remains from the Medici Family tomb in Florence, Italy has set to rest the question of whether or not family members were murdered.

King's Wall Protected Against Invasion and Plague

A section of the "King's Wall" constructed in Edinburgh, Scotland by James II has been discovered during excavation for a building site.

What Columbus Ate

Researchers have put together a menu of the food items eaten by Christopher Columbus and his crews on the three voyages to the New World.

Medici Mummies to Tell Tales?

On Sunday October 17, 2004, at 9:00 pm (EDT) TLC will present Mummy Detective: The Crypt of the Medici, a program examining the remains of 50 members of the Medici family to see how they lived — and how they died.

Sforza Hours Complete at Last

A page stolen from the Renaissance manuscript, the Sforza Hours, has at last been returned to the masterpiece.

DNA Test Results to Determine Columbus' Grave Uncertain

The controversy over the final resting place of explorer Christopher Columbus continues.

Time Team Denied Access to Rosslyn Chapel

Tony Robinson of Channel 4's Time Team has been denied access to look for the Holy Grail in Scotland's Rosslyn Chapel.

Da Vinci Code Fans Flock to Historic Sites

Fans of Dan Brown's Da Vinci Code are innundating sites in France in search of answers.

Mystery of Royal Mistress' Death

Historians are using DNA and modern forensic technology to investigate the death of Anges Sorel, mistress to Charles VII of France.

Unleash your Inner Leonardo

The point of this Themes list is for you to unleash the inner Leonardo da Vinci in the children. He was inventor, writer, painter, scientist and mathematician, to name but a few of his occupations. If we all had just a little Leonardo in us, the world might be a better place.

Discovery: Scientists Seek Santa Maria

Archaeologist Kathleen Deagan believes she may have found the resting site of Columbus' flagship, the Santa Maria.

Myrtle Beach Online: Da Vinci Code Fans Flock to Scottish Chapel

Fans of Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code are seeking the Holy Grail for themselves at Scotland's Rosslyn Chapel.

TV viewers select 15th century sites for 'Restoration'

British viewers of the program 'Restoration' have selected the Old Grammar House, built between 1434 and 1460 in Birmingham, and the Saracen's Head, built in 1492 in the nearby village of Kings Norton, to be restored with a grant of over 3 million pounds (over US$5.5 million).

Renaissance Roundel Auctioned for £7 million

A rare bronze roundel discovered under a stairway in Devon, England, has brought nearly UK£7 million in a recent auction, a record for a Renaissance piece.

£70,000 Needed to Save Britain's Oldest Theatre

This year's performances at a medieval Cornish amphitheatre, said to be the oldest working theatre in Britain, could be the last, as the community cannot afford to buy the adjacent plot of land from its present owners.

Smithsonian: Medieval Pageantry of the Palio

Siena, Italy is the site of the Palio, the famous — or infamous — free-for-all, bareback horse race that brings the pomp and splendor of the Middle Ages alive each year.

1421: The Year China Discovered America?

A documentary, airing on Wednesday, July 21, on PBS, examines Zheng He, a legendary Chinese admiral, and the spectacular Ming fleet of treasure junks he commanded in the early 15th century

Da Vinci doodles brought to life: Leonardo's genius on display in hometown museum

The main attraction of the Leonardiano Museum, in Vinci, Italy, is a model of a self-propelled vehicle based on a drawing that Leonardo da Vinci created in 1478.

Vandal Damages Venetian Statues

A recent wave of vandalism, which Venetian mayor Paolo Costa has blamed on "an isolated lunatic," has resulted in damage to a column of the Doge's Palace at St. Mark's Square

New Study of Voynich Manuscript Finds it Gibberish

In an article in Scientific American, Gordon Rugg discusses recent findings about the infamous Voynich Manuscript, a mysterious document filled with arcane symbols.

Was There a 15th-Century "Little" Medieval Warm Period?

Editorial commentary from CO2 Science Magazine, the journal of the Center for the Study of Carbon Dioxide and Global Change, discussing the scientific evidence for "a major spike in surface air temperature that began sometime in the early 1400s."

Exhibit on 15th Century Manuscripts at the Getty

''Fit for a King: Courtly Manuscripts, 1380-1450'' will be on display at the Getty Center in Los Angeles, California, through August 29.

Winged Detectives Find Renaissance Fresco

A flock of pigeons has led a group of art historians to a lost Renaissance fresco hidden in the ceiling of a Valencia cathedral.

The Independent: The Care and Feeding of the Renaissance Horse

The British Library has recently acquired a 16-page pamphlet published by Wynkyn de Worde in 1497, the earliest known veterinary textbook printed in Britain.

Santa Maria's Bell Returned to Spain

The ship's bell from Columbus' flagship, the Santa Maria, has been returned to Spain after a legal dispute with Portugal.

New Book on the Inquisition Published

Germany was where more male and female "witches" were killed by civilian tribunals around the start of the 15th century, according to a new book on the Inquisition -- about 25,000 out of a population of 16 million -- but the book's editor says that fewer people were killed in the Inquisition than is commonly believed.

Introducing Leonardo da Vinci

In her weekly column, Aoife shares her annotated research links on the ultimate Renaissance man: Leonardo da Vinci.