1401 CE to 1500 CE

New exhibition of drawings at the Getty

"Made for Manufacture: Drawings for Sculpture and the Decorative Arts" will be on display at the Getty Center in Los Angeles, California, through May 20.

"per manus sororum" published in German

The book of Tanja Kohwagner-Nikolai "per manus sororum" - a great book about mediaeval Klosterstich tapestries from the Low German language area is now available at the publishing house Martin Meidenbauer Verlagsbuchhandlung.

Bones probably not those of Joan of Arc

Eighteen experts, working to determine if a rib bone and a piece of cloth belonged to St. Joan of Arc, have not completely finished their task but now feel that "there is relatively little chance that the remnants are hers."

Swedish knight's oath

Sven Norén has posted a translation of a 15th century oath taken by 70 knights at the coronation of Christoph of Bavaria as King of Sweden in 1441.

Tower of London hires first female Beefeater

For the first time in its 522 year history, the Tower of London will enlist a female Beefeater. The name of the new Yeoman Warder has not been made public, but she was chosen from a group of six applicants, five men and one woman, as the "best candidate for the job."

Today in the Middle Ages: December 21, 1494

The city of Naples reported an outbreak of a new disease on December 21, 1494 C.E. Its modern name: syphilis.

Joan of Arc Relic Authenticity in Doubt

A piece of bone and fragment of blackened cloth preserved in France since the fifteenth century may not be authentic relics of St. Joan. A new scientific examination of the items raises questions.

England's First Printed Page

A photography of an indulgence printed by William Caxton in 1476 is available to view on the website of the UK National Archives. The page was the first printed in England.

Estate of Retired Librarian Includes Lost Fra Angelicos

Several paintings of saints created by 15th century monk and artist Fra Angelico have been discovered in England and are scheduled to be auctioned. The sale is expected to bring nearly US$2 million.

Odescalchi Castle has Rich History

Odescalchi Castle, the site of the November 18, 2006 nuptials of Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes, is a 15th century residence with a great deal of history including the family of Pope Innocent XI and a murderous noblewoman.

Soper Lane

A group of women in London have joined together to study and re-create the working lives of their counterparts in the 15th century. Soper Lane, named after the silkweaving district in London, offers information on textiles, costuming and other activities.

Optics Scholar Offers Discussion of Use of Projectors by Renaissance Painters

Dr. David G. Stork, Chief Scientist of Ricoh Innovations, heads up a discussion of a theory by David Hockney that painters, as far back as 1420, used projection devices to enable them to trace images onto canvas.

New exhibit of northern European art at the National Gallery

Prayers and Portraits: Unfolding the Netherlandish Diptych will be on display at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, through February 4.

Da Vinci's Mom May have been Middle Eastern

Analysis of a fingerprint left by Leonardo Da Vinci suggests the prototypical Renaissance man may have been the son of a Middle East-born slave woman.

Close Up: the Unicorn Tapestries

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has provided an online source for viewing their famous Unicorn Tapestries. The website invites visitors to zoom in for close up details of the designs.

"Gates of Paradise" to Tour USA

Lorenzo Ghiberti's immense gilded doors, completed in 1452 and nicknamed the "Gates of Paradise," will tour the United States beginning in April 2007. The intricately decorated doors are 20 feet high and weigh three tons.

Seeking Answers to Columbus Riddles

"Genovese nobleman or Catalan pirate? Adventurous explorer or greedy tyrant? What if the Italian gentleman who discovered America was in fact a brutal torturer and slave owner? And what if he wasn't even Italian?" Two Spanish scholars hope to answer some of the long-debated questions about Christopher Columbus using newly obtained evidence.

Welsh Barn Holds Secret: Medieval Dining Hall

Homeowners in Hengoed in Denbighshire, Wales were surprised to learn that a barn on their 21-acre farm contained a secret: the building was originally a rare, 15th medieval hall.

Shopping Center May Hide Rare 15th Century Jewish Cemetery

Archaeologists working on the site of a shopping center in Pizen, Bohemia are seeking a rare, Jewish cemetery dating to the 15th century. Researchers know that Jewish graves tend to be well-preserved and expect them to yield valuable information on the life of the community.

"Hound of Hartlepool" Baffles Experts

The 600-year-old bronze silhouette of a snarling dog has stumped experts who are trying to puzzle out its use. Weathervane? "Beware of Dog" sign? They aren't sure what to make of the crudely cut image, unearthed by Tees Archaeology.

New exhibit on Renaissance Italy at the V&A

"At Home in Renaissance Italy," on display at London's Victoria & Albert Museum through January 7, reveals the Renaissance interior's central role in the flourishing of Italian art and culture by providing an innovative three-dimensional view of the Italian Renaissance home, presented as object-filled spaces that bring the period to life.

Renaissance and Early Modern Festival Books Now Online

View 253 digitised Renaissance festival books (selected from over 2,000 in the British Library's collection) that describe the magnificent festivals and ceremonies that took place in Europe between 1475 and 1700.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 3, 1470

The readeption of previously deposed King Henry VI of England occurred on October 3, 1470. The mentally ill king had to be led by the hand during the celebratory parade.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 1, 1478

On October 1, 1478, plague returned to the city of Florence.

New exhibit on Leonardo da Vinci opens at the V&A

"Leonardo da Vinci: Experience, Experiment and Design," a new exhibition exploring how Leonardo da Vinci thought on paper, is on display at London's Victoria and Albert Museum through January 7.

Skeletons Tell Bloody Story

Skeletons bearing evidence of terrible injuries have been discovered beneath the floor of a dining hall in the North Yorkshire town of Towton, site of the longest and bloodiest battle ever fought in England.

Virtual Tour of the Alhambra

Love Spain but can't afford the plane fare? Visit the virtual walking tour of the Alhambra.

Today in the Middle Ages: August 29, 1475

Edward IV of England invaded France on August 29, 1475, a few years after eliminating Lancastrian resistance at the Battle of Tewkesbury.

Modesty Drives Change in Venetian Painting

Expert analysis of a 15th century Venetian painting by Giorgione shows that the artist changed the subject's clothing style from that of a "seductive female" to more modest dress.

Ear Scoop Declared Treasure

A medieval silver grooming implement discovered earlier this year by a metal detectorist, has been declared treasure by the Hatfield Coroner's Court.