1401 CE to 1500 CE

Laurel Challenges Met

On Saturday the XX of September, A.S. XLIII, a Laurel's Challenge was held at the St. Festus Faire in the Barony of Dragonship Haven (Southern CT).

Hungarians still seek “Raven King's” library

Hungarians are still searching for their own "Holy Grail," the lost library of Matthias Corvinus, a 15th century king who assembled more than 50,000 hand-copied volumes of religious texts, war stories and biographies, only to have them stolen by raiding Turks.

Medieval synagogue speaks of Jewish history in Vienna

The 15th century forced conversion of Vienna's Jews led to the community's expulsion from the city, but now archaeologists have discovered the remains of the walls and foundations of the Viennese Synagogue destroyed in 1421.

Academy da Cavalaria 2

description:
"Teaching the History of Horsemanship and the art of riding well."

http://www.myscaphotos.com/eventannouncements/2k8AcademydaCavalaria2.pdf

(25 Minutes East of Boise, ID)

September 6th, September 20th, & October 25th, 2008

Also see:
ht Location:
Dream River Ranch, Arh Hold, Artemisia. (25 Minutes East of Boise, ID)

[ART] Academy da Cavalaria 2

description:
"Teaching the History of Horsemanship and the art of riding well."

http://www.myscaphotos.com/eventannouncements/2k8AcademydaCavalaria2.pdf

(25 Minutes East of Boise, ID)

September 6th, September 20th, & October 25th, 2008

Also see:
ht Location:
Dream River Ranch in Arn Hold, Artemisia. (25 Minutes East of Boise, ID)

Author claims Da Vinci's drawings based on Chinese technology

Gavin Menzies, who in 2002 theorized that the Chinese reached the America's 7 decades before Columbus, has a new theory: Leonardo da Vinci's drawings were based on scientific encyclopedias brought to Italy in 1430 by a Chinese fleet.

Renaissance humor explained

Dr. Sarah Knight, a lecturer in Renaissance literature, explains Renaissance humor in an interview for the BBC.

Sutton Hoo Society to present "Arts and Crafts in the Mead Hall"

The Sutton Hoo Society will present Arts and Crafts in the Mead Hall: The Roots of English Culture on October 25, 2008 in Woodbridge, Suffolk, England. Registration costs 35 pounds per day for adults and 17 pounds for students.

300 rare Jewish books returned to Israel from Iraq

300 rare Jewish books, confiscated from Iraq's Jewish community during the regime of Saddam Hussein, have been returned to Israel. The works included a 15th century commentary on the biblical Book of Job.

A Muromachi period Tale of Genji manuscript found in Tokyo

The discovery of a rare full set of chapters of the 11th century The Tale of Genji, believed to be the world's oldest novel, has been found in a private collection in Tokyo.

Italian Renaissance garb exhibit in Washington, D.C. until July 31, 2008

The Italian Culture Institute in Washington will present Splendors of the Renaissance: Princely Attire in Italy until July 31, 2008. The exhibit is open by appointment only and I.D. is required.

Scribing hazardous to health of medieval monks

New research on the bones of monks interred in six Danish cemeteries shows that the brothers may have been exposed to toxic mercury while copying Biblical texts. Mercury was used in the preparation of red ink.

"Michelangelo Code" latest renaissance mystery

Reminiscent of "The Da Vinci Code," a decades-old mystery involves the claim that Michelangelo painted subversive messages into his frescoes in the Sistine Chapel, including "secret" profile of the medieval poet Dante and a portrait of Jesus on the cross.

Renaissance textiles in Kansas City

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Missouri will present Revealing, Reversible and Resplendent: 15th-17th-Century Italian and Spanish Textiles through August 17, 2008. The exhibit includes elaborately-embroidered and woven religious and secular pieces (photo)

Bowdoin College Museum of Art presents exhibit on Renaissance marriage

Beauty and Duty: The Art and Business of Renaissance Marriage, an exhibit which "examines the manner in which art played a vital role in the rituals and celebrations of Renaissance marriage" will be on display at the Bowdoin College Art Museum (Brunswick, Maine) until July 27, 2008. The event's website also includes games and activities for children.

New book claims China started the Renaissance

“A sophisticated Chinese delegation visited Italy in 1434, sparked the Renaissance and forever changed the course of Western civilization." This is the premise of a controversial new book by Gavin Menzies 1421: The Year China Discovered the World.

The Soldier in later Medieval England

An innovative new research project, sponsored by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, will look at the life of the professional soldier in England from 1369 to 1453.

Columbus-era ship yields wealth of artifacts

Geologists from De Beers, the diamond company, have discovered the wreck of a late 15th or early 16th century ship loaded with Spanish and Portuguese treasure behind a seawall in Namibia.

Tibetan Arms and Armor at Met

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City will host Tibetan Arms and Armor from the Permanent Collection through fall 2009 in the Arms and Armor Galleries, 1st floor, Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Gallery.

Lord Edward Mac Tavish achieves Veneur at Gulf Wars XVII

Lord Edward MacTavish was recognized as Veneur, the highest level of Hunter in the Hunt Guild Persona Challenge. He challenged each level over the course of several years at Gulf Wars.

David gets a facelift

Donatello's David, the 15th century masterpiece housed at Florence's Bargello Museum, has had "work done" in the form of laser treatment to clean off residue, including gold leaf used "on the statue to highlight its wavy hair and clothing."

Plans to exhume Galileo cause controversy

Plans to exhume the body of Renaissance scientist Galileo Galilei in order to test his DNA and establish the cause of his blindness have caused problems with the Catholic Church. The Rector of the Basilica of the Holy Cross in Florence, where Galileo is buried, is opposed to the exhumation.

Purloined map returned to Spain

A rare 15th century Ptolemy world view map stolen in 2007 from the National library of Spain has been discovered in a Sydney, Australia art gallery and returned to Spain.

Learn chess with Leonardo

Experts are speculating on whether the illustrations in a newly-discovered manuscript on chess were drawn by Leonardo da Vinci. De ludo scacchorum was discovered last year in a private collection.

Renaissance Dance Database

The Renaissance Dance Database is a tool for accessing the various dance resources available on the web. It enables searching by style, creator, primary source, or number of dancers. Suggestions of new links and resources are always welcome.

Renaissance dance weekend in England

Renaissance Footnotes will hold a weekend-long, Italian Renaissance dance workshop November 29-30, 2008 at Hurst Village Hall near Reading, England.

"Forbidden Shoes" in Toronto

On Tuesday April 1, 2008 from 6:00-7:00 pm, the Bata Shoe Museum in Toronto, Ontario will present Forbidden Shoes: Fear and Footwear in Renaissance Italy, a lecture by Professor Maria Giuseppina Muzzarelli of the University of Bologna, Italy.

Columbus may have spread "social disease"

A new study claims that explorer Christopher Columbus may have been responsible for bringing syphilis to Europe. The controversial theory has been debated for years, but the new study of molecular genetics may show whether the theory is true.

Hungary's Year-Long Rennaisance Festival

The contemporary celebration marks 550 years since the celebrated Hungarian King Matthias brought Italian Renaissance thinkers and artists to Hungary and contributed to the development of humanist ideas in greater Europe.

“People of the Book" filled with "danger, oppression and high drama"

In a review for the New York Times, Janet Maslin discusses People of the Book by Geraldine Brooks, a novel about book preservation that revolves around the discovery of a medieval Haggadah, an illuminated manuscript which describes the Jewish Passover Seder.