Jewelry/Lapidary

Creating ornamental works from precious and semiprecious stones

Treasures from a Byzantine garbage dump

Early Byzantines in Tel Aviv, Israel probably thought themselves very clever when they buried a hoard of "400 coins, 200 intact Samaritan lamps and gold jewelry" in a garbage heap somewhere between the 5th-7th centuries. Perhaps they were, because the hoard was only found recently by a team of archaeologists from Tel Aviv University and the Israel Antiquities Authority. (video)

Vikings "stole by the armload"

Sometimes Vikings are just Vikings. Studies of jewelry created by Viking artists show that objects gold and jewels used in the objects originated in the churches and monasteries of Ireland. Now Dr Griffin Murray of the Department of Archaeology at UCC asks that Irish loot be returned - in the form of a temporary exhibition.

Coroner's inquest finds coin pendant treasure

A coroner's inquest has declared an "early-medieval gold pendant created from an imitation of a Byzantine coin," found in a field in Norfolk, England, to be treasure. The necklace was created as an imitation of a Byzantine-era coin, and is believed to have been made in France. (photo)

Fourteenth-Century Poison Ring Found in Bulgaria

Made of bronze, the ring appears to be made for a man's little finger and has a hidden "exit hole" where the poison could be poured out.

Olde Worlde Designs

Olde Worlde Designs offers quality handmade Medieval and Renaissance clothing, accessories and underpinnings. Their ever-growing line of clothing includes noble gowns, doublets, tunics, corsets, underpinnings, jewelry, hats and more. They provide custom made garb for any size and any occasion.

Staffordshire Hoard glass

A 2012 entry on the Staffordshire Hoard blog takes an "up close and personal" look at the use of glass in the gold artifacts of the Hoard. While the majority of gemstones in the objects have been identified as garnets, a number of the colored, transparent inlays are glass. The article includes a number of photos.

Jewelry leads to expansion of knowledge of Vikings in England

Fifty years ago, little was known about Viking settlements in England, where they were and who lived in them, but the discovery of Nordic metalwork and jewelry in the past twenty years, thanks largely to the development of the metal detector, has opened up a whole new world of understanding. Jane Kershaw of OUPblog has the story. (photos)

Viking gold "part of the big jigsaw of the history" in Ireland

Metal detector enthusiast Tom Crawford had a good day recently when he discovered a Viking gold ingot and a medieval silver ring brooch in a farmer's field in County Down, Northern Ireland. The ingot dates to the 9th and 10th centuries, while the brooch is somewhat later. (photo)

Palio de Stonemarche 2013 photos online

Brita reports that she has created an album of photos from Palio de Stonemarche which took place June 15, 2013 in the East Kingdom. The photos are available to view on Shutterfly.

Corning Museum to host glass bead exhibition and conference

Until January 5, 2014, the Corning Museum of Glass will present Life on a String: 35 Centuries of the Glass Bead, a major exhibition of glass beads and beadwork from many cultures. In addition, the museum will offer demonstrations of bead-making, as well as hosting its Annual Seminar on Glass October 18-19, 2013.

Tolkien inspiration on display in Hampshire

Eight years before J.R.R. Tolkien published The Hobbit, archaeologist Sir Mortimer Wheeler sought the author's opinion about a cursed Roman ring discovered in Silchester, Hampshire in the 1920's. The ring, along with a tablet, cursing any thief who thought to steal it, are believed to have inspired Tolkien's One Ring.

Mathematics solves mystery of Viking craftsmanship

Historians and craftsmen have long pondered the absolute regularity of Viking jewelry made from twisted rods of gold and silver, but a new theory by Kasper Olsen and Jakob Bohr at the Technical University of Denmark may have solved the puzzle: mathematics.

Experts debate age of York sapphire ring

A group of experts convened recently at the Yorkshire Museum to debate the age of the beautiful Escrick Ring, found in a field near York, England. The ring was believed to date from the 12th through 16th centuries, but some now think as early as the 5th century. (photo)

“It went beep, beep, beep. Then we dug into the mud"

Finding treasure with a metal detector is a hobby for all ages. Just ask three-year-old James Hyatt who, along with Dad and Grandpa, discovered an engraved gold reliquary locket from the early 16th century 8 inches beneath the Essex soil. (photo)

Red Comyn's pendant found in Scottish field

“It’s the find of a lifetime. I’ve been searching for historic gems for more than 30 years and found nothing like this.," said John Eldridge from North Berwick, who used a metal detector to find a 14th century harness pendant belonging to Sir John Comyn in a field near Loch Leven Castle in Scotland. (photo)

Viking valkyrie to be showcased in Denmark, Britain

In December 2012, metal detector enthusiast Morten Skovsby got lucky near the village of Hårby, Denmark.  His detector hit on a thumb-sized silver figurine depicting a Valkyrie, the only known 3D Viking representation of the battle maiden. (photos)

Hair and headdress English-style

Have questions about how to dress your hair or wear a headdress English-style? Tufts University can help with its website entitled Jewels, Hair and Accessories of the Middle Ages.

Escrick ring baffles archaeologists

A beautiful sapphire ring discovered in 2009 by a metal detectorist in North York, England, has stumped experts who have been unable to date the ring. (photo)

Saxon brooch found at site of Northampton Castle

Construction work to replace a train station in Northampton, England has unearthed "an ironstone wall, fragments of pottery and a Saxon brooch." (photo)

Winchester Round Table re-created as watch

For the SCAdian who has everything: 18 K rose gold watch depicting the Round Table of King Arthur and his knights, in a limited saeries of 88. The watch, by Roger Dubuis, will be showcased at the 2013 Salon of Haute Horlogerie. (photos)

Experts stumped by Roman earring

The design on a gold earring disc, discovered by a metal detector enthusiast in Keswick, England, has experts stumped. The disc dates to the Roman era and "features a scorpion, phallus, snake and crab." (photo)

Norfolk metal detectorist finds declared treasure

Several objects dating to the Middle Ages have been declared treasure by the Norfolk Historic Environment Services, including a 6th century brooch, an Anglo-Saxon sword belt mount, and a copper alloy jetton converted to a brooch. (photos)

Henry VIII's Crown - An Update

A  new 11-minute video from Hampton Court Palaces provides details of the behind-the-scenes construction of the replica crown worn by Henry VIII.

Treasury

The Treasury provides a wide assortment of artist-made reproduction and historically inspired jewelry and dress accessories. The owner-artist, Eirny Thorvaldsdottir, O.L. (Irene Davis) combines decades of experience as a mixed media artist specializing in metal and lamp-worked glass.

Dragon Nymph Crafting

Dragon Nymph Crafting makes elf ears. They also offer faery ears, wood nymph ears, goblin ears, pixie ears, and other fantasy creatures.

13th century silver brooch declared treasure

In 2011, metal detectorist Frank Kurzeja discovered a silver brooch 10 inches beneath the soil near Cowfold, England. The brooch has recently been declared treasure. (photo)

Byzantine jewelry sparkles in New York gallery show

Les Enluminures gallery in New York City will present Byzantium and the West: Jewelry in the First Millennium, its fall 2012 show featuring Byzantine jewelry from the 3rd through 10th centuries. The exhibit will be open November 2 to 30, 2012 with  possible auction taking place in December.

Oxfordshire Museum displays Anglo Saxon brooch

Until the end of December, 2012, the Oxfordshire Museum is proudly exhibiting a 7th century garnet and gold brooch discovered in a woman's grave in Oxfordshire in 2009. (photo)

Henry VIII's Crown and Pew

Henry VIII's crown has been recreated for display at Hampton Court in the newly restored "Royal Pew" in the Chapel Royal.

Yorkshire Museum needs UK£2,000 to buy Richard III badge

In 2010, a metal detecting enthusiast from Stillingfleet, near York, England discovered a real treasure, a rare silver gilt badge in the shape of a boar linked to the supporters of King Richard III. Now the Yorkshire Museum hopes to raise UK£2,000 to buy the badge for its collection. (photo)