1401 CE to 1500 CE

New Richard III exhibit sparks outcry

Historians and Richard III experts are outraged over an exhibit in the new Richard III Visitor Centre in Leicester, England which features the armor of the warrior king painted white, making him look like a "Star Wars stormtrooper." (photos, video)

Richard III descendant to craft king's coffin

In 2013, when experts believed they had discovered the remains of King Richard III, they turned to Michael Ibsen, a 17th generation relation of the monarch for DNA testing. Now Ibsen has been tapped for service again - as the builder of the royal coffin.

Conservation plan for Battle of Northampton site approved

"This year we are celebrating the rich and interesting story of Northampton and our nation. So it seems only fitting that we are looking carefully at how we can protect the site of one of the most significant battles fought on English soil," said Tim Hadland of the Northampton Borough Council about plans to preserve the Battle of Northampton site.

Richard's spine shows evidence of scoliosis

Readers of Shakespeare's Richard III know that the medieval king was a hunchback, but a new study of the king's remains shows that Richard actually suffered from scoliosis.

Lost village discovered on Scottish borderland

A number of 16th century documents mention the village of Philiphaugh, with its "tower, fortalice, manors, gardens, orchards and mills," on the border between Scotland and England, but the settlement has long ago disappeared. Now new excavations may reveal where the town once stood. (photos)

Santa Maria found?

“All the geographical, underwater topography and archaeological evidence strongly suggests that this wreck is Columbus’ famous flagship, the Santa Maria,” said underwater archaeologist Barry Clifford about the discovery of what may be the Santa Maria, Christopher Columbus' flagship off the coast of Haiti.

Richard III: An Overview

The verdict is finally in: the remains of Richard III, England's last medieval king, will be laid to rest, with great pomp and circumstance, in Leicester Cathedral after judges put an end to requests that he be buried in York. The BBC's Greig Watson has an overview of the Richard saga. (photos)

Mona Lisa in 3-D?

The discovery of a Mona Lisa twin in the Museo del Prado in Madrid has led art historians and scientists to consider if Da Vinci's most famous work was actually the world's oldest 3-D artwork. (photos)

Late medieval history course online

For those interested in furthering their knowledge of medieval English history, a team of scholars from the University of Leicester is offering a free, online course entitled England in the time of King Richard III.

15th century Torah sold at auction for US$3.87 million

“The volume represents the very first appearance in print of all five books of the Pentateuch as well as the first to which vocalization and cantillation marks have been added,” said the Christie's auction house catalogue about the sale of a Torah, printed in Hebrew in Bologna in January 1482. An anonymous buyer paid US$3.87 million for the book. (photo)

Storks return to Thrigby Hall

In the Middle Ages, it was common to see white storks, which breed in continental Europe and migrate to Africa in the winter, nesting in the chimneys of England, but no stork has done so for 600 years - until now. (photo, video)

New books of poetry at Project Gutenberg

A text copy of all 3 volumes of Thomas Percy's Reliques of Ancient English Poetry was recently posted to Project Gutenberg. These books contain a great deal of poetry in middle and early modern English.

Japanese IT company to digitize more Vatican documents

The Vatican Library processes many requests to use documents and manuscripts from its enormous collection, but the increased requests have led to fear that the fragile documents will be damaged. Enter NTT DATA, a Japanese IT company who has been contracted to digitize 3,000 manuscripts at a cost of 18 million euros (US $22.6 million).

Seeking Howe's

600 years ago, Howe's was a satellite community of Cambridge, England. Then it disappeared off the map. Now archaeologists have begun investigating Howe's, along with three other villages, that ringed the medieval university town.

International team to search for Grunwald Battle location

For centuries, historians have debated the location of the Battle of Grunwald, fought 15 July 1410 between the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and the German–Prussian Teutonic Knights. Now members of an international team will begin looking in the Great Stream Valley in Poland.

Bread oven and sewing kit found in Northampton dig

An archaeological excavation in Northampton, England, has thus far revealed the remains of a bread oven, a 13th century well, a 15th century sewing kit and trading tokens, leading experts to believe that there was a settlement in the area. (photos)

Old Nieszawa virtually rebuilt

The original Polish town of Nieszawa, on the Vistula River, only existed for 35 years before it was demolished and rebuilt 32 km upstream, but now it lives again - virtually - thanks to a two-year non-invasive investigation including geophysics and aerial prospection.

Kitty 1; scribe 0

Any cat owner who participates in needlework or scribal arts will sympathize with a 15th century Dutch monk who indicated a stain on his work and wrote "Cursed be the pesty cat that urinated over this book." (photo)

Illuminated almanac: 15th century iPad?

The Wellcome Library has acquired a rare medical almanac, a "combined calendar, astrological chart and medical textbook," that compacts into a small, folded strip, for UK£100,000 from the Edith Sitwell collection. The illuminated alamnac is believed to have been produced in an English workshop in the early 15th century. (photo)

Illuminated Mystery Play Is Digitized

The British Museum has digitized, in two online volumes, a highly-decorated copy of a French medieval mystery play, with illuminations depicting scenes from the play.

Harlech remains may date to Wars of the Roses

Workers constructing a new visitor center at Harlech Castle in Wales were surprised to find the remains of three people, possibily dating to the time of the Wars of the Roses. Medieval foundations were also discovered, which may mean the site was once a churchyard.

"Stunning" St George and the Dragon painting found in Welsh church

Beneath 20 layers of paint and lime, conservators have recently uncovered "stunning" 15th century wall paintings in the small, 13th century church of St Cadoc's in Llancarfan, Vale of Glamorgan, Wales. (video)

Experience the viola organista

Leonardo Da Vinci had more projects than time, a fact illustrated by his notesbooks of inventions never built, but Polish pianist Slawomir Zubrzycki recently took on one challenging by constructing da Vinci's viola organista, an instrument which combines "the bowed sound of a viola (or cello) with a cabinet that resembles a baby grand piano." (video)

3D X-ray to reveal secrets of "unreadable" scroll

"Having the chance to unlock a part of Norfolk history which has been closed to us for maybe hundreds of years feels very special," said Gary Tuson, from the Norfolk Records Office about plans to x-ray a 15th century scroll that is too delicate to unroll.

Clan Macneil aids in restoration of Kisimul Castle

Members of Clan Macneil have joined forces with Historic Scotland to raise UK£200,000 for the restoration of Kisimul Castle in Barra. The 15th century fortress was the stronghold of the clan in the Western Isles.

House Book of York on display at Yorkshire Museum

The civic archive of the city of York, England has loaned the 15th century House Book of the city to the Yorkshire Museum until December 2013. The book will be on display for the first time in history. The manuscript details public opinion of King Richard III.

Battlefield discovery inhibits rail construction

Riders of a English railways will have to wait a little longer for the HS2 line thanks to the discovery of a previously "lost" site of a Wars of the Roses battlefield. The site of the Battle of Edgecote between the Earl of Warwick and King Edward IV, fought July 26 1469 in Northamptonshire, lies along the route of the high-speed rail link.

15th century "pop-up" book

On his Tumblr page, Dutch book historian Erik Kwakkel features a 15th century "pop-up" book, complete with a three dimensional illustration of the phases of the moon. (photo)

Yorkshire chapel may be Richard III's

A team of archaeologists from the University of York believe they have discovered the remains of a 15th century chapel ordered to be built by Richard III to commemorate the Battle of Towton (1461).

Richard III to be given kingly burial in Leicester

Plans have been announced for the interment of King Richard III, whose remains were discovered in 2012, in Leicester Cathedral. The announcement follows news that a legal challenge by distant relatives of the King requesting his burial in York, had been denied. The re-burial, complete with pomp and circumstance will take pace in 2014.