1301 CE to 1400 CE

Animal bones used in construction of Spanish walls

Archaeologists studying the chemistry of 14th century Moorish architecture have found that burnt animal bones were mixed with other materials to create a protective covering for walls. Analysis of the walls, coupled with the discovery of a 14th century brick oven, have led to the conclusion.

Salisbury inspires medieval moments

Travelers to London looking for a day trip may want to consider Salisbury in Wiltshire, a medieval city complete with impressive cathedral, museums and historic houses, and restaurants and pubs. Jennifer Conlin of the New York Times has a travel review.

Dante inspires video game

Dante Alighieri's 14th century masterpiece The Divine Comedy has now inspired a video game. Electronic Arts Inc. has announced that it is working on a new game based on Dante’s Inferno.

Remains of 3 Teutonic Knights found in Poland

The silk-wrapped remains of three grand masters of the Teutonic Knights have been found by archaeologists in a cathedral in Kwidzyn, Poland. The Order of the Teutonic Knights was founded in the late 12th century to aid German pilgrims in the Holy Land.

Spanish grail "has tremendous cultural value"

While it may not be the true Holy Grail, an international congress held November 7-9, 2008 at the Catholic University of Valencia, Spain declared that the artifact "has tremendous cultural value due to its impact on history and literature."

14th century silver mount discovered in County Durham, England

A metal detector hobbyist has discovered a 14th century silver mount, believed to have been used "as a decorative item on leather clothes," near Barnard Castle, County Durham, England. (photo)

Ancient tsunamis devastated Asian coasts

The recent tsunamis that have caused such devastation in the Indian Ocean may not have been the first. According to a new study which sampled sediments in Thailand and Sumatra, the area may have been hit by a massive tsunami between 600 and 700 years ago.

Russian horse tomb stumps archaeologists

The discovery of a 14th century tomb at Staraya Russa holding the remains of 14 horses puzzles archaeologists. The experts feel the site was not used for slaughter or rituals, but have no other explanation for the mass grave.

Digital project to analyze Middle English grammar

A team of philologists at the University of Stavanger in Norway are set to begin "the most comprehensive analysis of middle English ever" by studying original manuscripts from the 1300s–1500s. Their focus is to understand Middle English grammar.

"Forme of Cury," King Richard II's recipe book, online

A manuscript containing over 400 recipes dating to the time of King Richard II is being digitized in preparation for online release. The manuscript is one of 40 in a project by the University of Manchester's John Rylands University Library. (photo)

14th century cemetery found in Berlin

Workers at a building site in central Berlin have stumbled across a huge medieval cemetery containing 2,000 bodies dating to the 14th century. Many of the remains are those of children.

Medieval synagogue speaks of Jewish history in Vienna

The 15th century forced conversion of Vienna's Jews led to the community's expulsion from the city, but now archaeologists have discovered the remains of the walls and foundations of the Viennese Synagogue destroyed in 1421.

Knights Templar demand redress from the Pope

700 years after the Knights Templar were eradicated by the Catholic Church, the Association of the Sovereign Order of the Temple of Christ has launched a court case in Spain demanding that the Church exonerate the Order and return assets worth EU€100bn.

Canterbury Astrolabe Quadrant bought by British Museum

The British Museum recently raised UK£350,000 to buy a rare 14th century astrolabe discovered in Kent, England in 2005. The Canterbury Astrolabe Quadrant is one of only eight such instruments in the world. (photo)

Textile resource from Burgos Cathedral available online

Bridgette reports that The Report on the Textiles from Burgos Cathedral, Madrid, Spain is now available online in PDF format.

Records of the Parliaments of Scotland to 1707 online

A fully-searchable database chronicling the proceedings of the Scottish Parliaments from 1235 up to 1707 is now available online.

St. Ivan Rilski's church discovered in Bulgaria

A team of archaeologists led by Nikolay Ovcharov have unearthed a 13th century church in Veliko Tarnovo. The site is believed to have once housed the relics of St. Ivan Rilski.

Duke Student creates 3-D virtual medieval cathedral

The Duke University daily online newsletter has a short movie about the student who created a 3-D virtual cathedral, with a great deal of footage of the cathedral itself and links to other related items.

Dante given stay of execution

Officials in Florence, Italy have granted Dante Alighieri, Italy's most famous poet, a stay of execution. The poet was exiled in 1302 with a mandate that he "would be executed if he stepped foot in the city again."

[ANT] Autumn War

description:
My Lords and Ladies, the Barony of Blatha an Oir and the Barony of Stromgard, being unable to settle their differences peacefully, have "regretfully" announced that they have no choice but to settle them on the battlefield.

This means WAR! That's right, Autumn War 2008 is here! That means 5 days packed full of activities with a couple thousand of your closest friends.

Now, of course, everyone loves a good war, and we also know that many members of the populace have other interests, as well. That's why there will also be Archery, Thrown Weapons, Games, Hattie Longtooth Memorial Woodworking Contest, Iron Needle, Single-Entry A&S Competition, a Mini-Ithra, Tabletop Trebuchet Contest, War Siege Engines, Pied Piper activities, and more…. Location:
Randle, WA

The Soldier in later Medieval England

An innovative new research project, sponsored by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, will look at the life of the professional soldier in England from 1369 to 1453.

Smoking ban leads to discovery of medieval artifact

A 14th century gravestone has been lying unnoticed as part of the wall of the Blacksmiths Arms in Mickleton, County Durham, England. One of the pub regulars, an archaeologist, spotted it low in the wall as he stood outside puffing his pipe, because he can no longer smoke inside the bar.

Foxley Manor: A 14th Century Journal

Online journal of 14th century interests and their re-creation.

Tower lions from northwest Africa

Recent study of a pair of lion skulls discovered during excavations of the Tower of London reveals that the lions originated near the Barbary Coast of Northwest Africa. The skulls, which dated from the 13th or 14th centuries, were carbon dated and tested for DNA.

14th Century Game gets Official Recognition

The Sports Council in England has agreed that Stoolball, a medieval game mostly localized to southeastern England, meets its criteria to be recognized as a sport. Approximately 4,000 people in the vicinity of Kent, Surrey, Sussex and Hampshire play Stoolball.

Medieval "Chemists" found in Scotland

Archaeologists have discovered a 700-year-old chemists, an herb garden, which supplied the Soutra Hospital near Edinburgh, Scotland.

John the Bruce?

Publishers of a new book by Senator John McCain claim that the American presidential candidate is a descendant of Scotland's great hero, Robert the Bruce, a claim that historians call "baloney."

Medieval skull and remains found in river

A worker dredging in the River Lark in Suffolk, England, recently found a skull and other human remains from the Middle Ages. The find also included bones from a juvenile and a metal buckle that has been dated to the 14th century.

Remains of Sir Hugh Despenser the Younger identified at Hulton Abbey

Archaeologists believe that they have identified mutilated remains found at Hulton Abbey as those of Sir Hugh Despenser the Younger, reputed to have been the lover of Edward II. The remains were first discovered in the 1970s.

Medieval scandals in three new books

Medieval scandals are the hot reads of the day according to London Times reviwer Nicholas Vincent who reviews three new books dealing with powerful men - and women - of the Middle Ages.