1301 CE to 1400 CE

Battle records of English soldiers 1369 to 1453 now online

The detailed service records of 250,000 soldiers who served during the Hundred Years War is now availa le to view online. The website, sponsored by Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), was the brainchild of Anne Curry of the University of Southampton and Dr Adrian Bell of the University of Reading.

Danish expert declares Vinland Map genuine

For years, experts have disputed the legitimacy of the Vinland Map, the famous 15th century map which depicted parts of North America many years before its discovery by Christopher Columbus. Now Rene Larsen, rector of the School of Conservation under the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, has declared the map genuine.

The lost art of timbrel vaulting

In its "Lost Knowledge" column, Make: Online presents an article on the lost medieval art of timbrel vaulting, an architectural technique using a "system of interlocking terracotta tiles which create what are known as Guastavino domes, after their inventor, Rafael Guastavino." (photos and diagrams)

14th century village discovered in Finland

Archaeologists have found the remains of houses dating to the 14th century in the Espoo district of Mankby, Finland. The discovery has excited the archaeological community, since late medieval villages are a rare discovery in the country.

Remnant of medieval book found in Bulgarian churchyard

Experts are studying the silver and gold casing of a medieval book dating to the end of the 14th century discovered recently in the yard of St. Peter and St. Paul Church in Veliko Tarnovo, Bulgaria.

NPR series follows path of modern Canterbury pilgrims

A recent multi-part NPR series retraces the steps of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales pilgrims in modern England from London to Canterbury. The site includes an interactive map of the journey.

Palace of the Great Khan may lie beneath Khara Khorum

In the 13th century, Kublai Khan, grandson of the great Genghis Khan, moved the ruling city of China to Beijing, but prior to the time, the Mongolian capital, Khara Khorum, was an international city of great renown. Now archaeologists believe they know the whereabouts of the Palace of the Great Khan.

Viewing Giotto through modern eyes

An article on great works of art for the UK's paper The Independent discusses how works of art from the past are viewed through modern eyes. Included is The Lamentation of Christ by 14th century Italian master Giotto, whose angels seem to zoom about like jet planes. (photo)

Pope creates two new medieval saints

Among the five new saints created recently by Pope Benedict were a 14th century Portuguese friar and an early 14th-century Sienese aristocrat. The saints were canonized in a ceremony at the Vatican.

"Harken to Me" Late Middle English romances online

A special edition of Medieval Forum offers translations of late Middle English romances, "accompanied by brief commentaries on issues raised in the poems." The site also includes a bibliography and material on the various poems.

New Dig at Bodiam Castle

The need for better sewage facilities to deal with visitors has created an opportunity for a dig at Bodiam Castle in Sussex, England. The 14th-century building is considered an outstanding example of a late medieval moated castle.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 22, 1370

On April 22, 1370, the first stones of the Bastille were laid in Paris. Initial construction of the fortress was completed in 1382.

Mysterious message of the Alhambra decoded

Researchers and lovers of the Alhambra, the 14th century palace in Castile, Spain, have long puzzled and marveled at the Arabic inscriptions which cover the walls and arches of the building, wondering "What are these walls telling me?" Now Juan Castilla, from the School of Arabic Studies at Spain's Higher Scientific Research Council, has produced a video which claims to translate 3,116 of more than 10,000 inscriptions carved around the building.

School teaches late Middle Ages jousting

Knight School, a division of Historic Enterprises, is offering hands-on instruction in equestrian combat at regularly scheduled jousting classes. The classes offer school-provided horses but also welcome riders who have their own.

In 1492 Scotto sailed the ocean blue, laddie

According to Spanish historian Alfonso Ensenat de Villalonga, Christopher Columbus was born in Genoa, Italy to Scottish shopkeepers, and was christened Peter Scotto.

irish armor

I am needing help finding the style or armor the Irish wore in the 14th century. I am new to the SCA and I am trying to create armor for my persona so that I can start fighting. Any and all help will be appreciated. Thanks, Aengus

Levenger offers Sarajevo Haggadah facsimile

The Levenger Company has produced a facsimile of the Sarajevo Haggadah, a 14th century Spanish prayer book and the oldest haggadah known. The original found its way to Sarajevo, and was saved by an Islamic scholar during World War II.

Musical ear helps British metal detectorist find medieval ring

Douglas Fletcher of Flint, England has a fancy French metal detector which emits a differently-pitched sound for different metals. This, along with a musician's sense of pitch, allowed him to discover a silver ring dating to the 14th century.

Robert the Bruce's palace found

Lost for more than 700 years, the palace of Robert the Bruce may have been discovered in Renton "a run-down area of West Dunbartonshire." Experts have found artifacts and foundations matching historic documents relating to the Bruce's home.

Jewish treasures on display in England

The Treasures of the Black Death exhibit at London's Wallace Collection showcase two hoards of medieval jewelry dating to the 14th century. The treasures were owned - and buried with - Jewish families who perished during the Black Plague. (photos)

Medieval chainmail for sale on eBay

An authentic chainmail hauberk is being offered for sale on eBay. According to the description, the 14th to 15th century piece is "of highest quality and in perfect condition of preservation," although it appears to be missing one sleeve.

Medieval Facebook

Researchers working with land documents dating to the 13th century have discovered Facebook-like social networks that tied together ten villages in southwest France.

Jean I: Rightful King of France

In a strange footnote to the Hundred Years' War, a Sienese merchant named Giannino di Guccio came to believe that he was actually King Jean I of France. A new book, translated from Italian, he Man Who Believed He Was King of France by Tommaso di Carpegna Falconieri, tells the story.

Animal bones used in construction of Spanish walls

Archaeologists studying the chemistry of 14th century Moorish architecture have found that burnt animal bones were mixed with other materials to create a protective covering for walls. Analysis of the walls, coupled with the discovery of a 14th century brick oven, have led to the conclusion.

Salisbury inspires medieval moments

Travelers to London looking for a day trip may want to consider Salisbury in Wiltshire, a medieval city complete with impressive cathedral, museums and historic houses, and restaurants and pubs. Jennifer Conlin of the New York Times has a travel review.

Dante inspires video game

Dante Alighieri's 14th century masterpiece The Divine Comedy has now inspired a video game. Electronic Arts Inc. has announced that it is working on a new game based on Dante’s Inferno.

Remains of 3 Teutonic Knights found in Poland

The silk-wrapped remains of three grand masters of the Teutonic Knights have been found by archaeologists in a cathedral in Kwidzyn, Poland. The Order of the Teutonic Knights was founded in the late 12th century to aid German pilgrims in the Holy Land.

Spanish grail "has tremendous cultural value"

While it may not be the true Holy Grail, an international congress held November 7-9, 2008 at the Catholic University of Valencia, Spain declared that the artifact "has tremendous cultural value due to its impact on history and literature."

14th century silver mount discovered in County Durham, England

A metal detector hobbyist has discovered a 14th century silver mount, believed to have been used "as a decorative item on leather clothes," near Barnard Castle, County Durham, England. (photo)

Ancient tsunamis devastated Asian coasts

The recent tsunamis that have caused such devastation in the Indian Ocean may not have been the first. According to a new study which sampled sediments in Thailand and Sumatra, the area may have been hit by a massive tsunami between 600 and 700 years ago.