1301 CE to 1400 CE

Hurling takes root in the USA

During practice, members of the Worcester Hurling Club hit a sliotar (ball) with their hurleys (stick). That's Worcester, Massachusetts, not England.

Face of a 14th century knight revealed

State-of-the-art technology has been used to reconstruct the face of a medieval knight whose skeleton was discovered beneath Stirling Castle in Scotland. (photo)

Website traces European effigies

The Effigies and Brasses website offers links and images for numerous European effigies, brasses, incised slabs, half-reliefs, and other miscellaneous representations dating from the 12th-15th centuries.

Tournament of Friends II photos

And so the Great Tournament of Friends came and went. Four mounted warriors took the field and conducted several matches each. One mounted warrior, Fillipo Clemente Esposti, earned the title of Champion.

Jewish contributions to medieval Spain

“Uneasy Communion: Jews, Christians and the Altarpieces of Medieval Spain”  opened recently at the Museum of Biblical Art near New York's Lincoln Center. The exhibition takes a historical approach to Jewish contributions to Christian art in the two centuries before they were expelled from Spain by Queen Isabella in 1492.

"Dante's inferno", a new take on Hell

The marketers of Electronic Arts' videogame Dante's Inferno had an unusual rollout plan: self-protest the game, based on Dante Alighieri's 14th century work, as an evil, anti-Christian entertainment to drum up publicity for the game. Reviewers found Inferno to be less hellish and more of a dud. Mark Oppenheimer of the New York Times has the story.

English castle saved by Heritage grant

Years of exposure to weather and thick-growing ivy nearly brought about an end to Suffolk, England's Mettingham Castle until a grant of UK£290,565 from English Heritage saved the structure.

Wet summers may have contributed to devastation of Black Plague

A team of scientists, who have studied tree rings and medieval wooden architectural materials to determine the climate of the late Middle Ages, report that wet summers were a contributing factor to the disaster of the Black Death in the 14th century.

14th century remains give "fascinating insight" into Fenwick history

The discovery of a grave dating to the 13th or 14th century may provide a link to a medieval settlement that existed at West Fenwick, England.

Ultra-violet rays reveal Giotto treasures in Florence chapel

Restoration experts using ultra-violet technology have rediscovered details of 14th wall paintings by the Italian master Giotto in the Peruzzi Chapel at the Santa Croce Church in Florence, Italy. (photo)

14th century "piedfort" leads to prosecution of British woman

The controversy over the prosecution of a Ludlow, England woman who failed to report the discovery of a 14th century piedfort, a ceremonial coin, has led to claims of being "heartless authoritarians" against the officials. (photo)

The "sensual experience" of the "Belles Heures of Jean de France, Duc de Berry"

For many years, visitors to the Cloisters in New York were treated to a glimpse of one of the museum's most precious artifacts, the Belles Heures of Jean de France, Duc de Berry, a 14th century manuscript, opened to only one page. Now, with the book unbound, they can gaze at all all 172 illuminations. (photos)

Erwin Tomash Library offers insight into history of computing, geometry, and mathematics

A casual interest in the history of computing led Erwin Tomash, who started his career in computer engineering in the 1940s and became one of the pioneers of the information age, to compile an encyclopedic, illustrated catalog of primary source references dating back to the 12th century CE. The catalog is available online for free access.

Forum centers on Hundred Years War

The Hundred Years War Underground is a  new forum created "for those interested in exploring the history of the Hundred Years War."

British ponder mystery of Richard II

A visit to Westminster Abbey will show visitors the tomb of King Richard II - or will it? Researchers are wondering if tests on remains found at a former Dominican friary in Stirling, Scotland might determine them to be those of the 14th century king.

Period quilts on display at European museums

Lisa Evans, from the Quilt History discussion list, reports that two famous period quilts, the Tristan Quilt and the Coperta di Usella, will be on display this spring at museums in London and Florence.

Skull of St. Bridget may not be authentic

A research group at Uppsala University's Department of Genetics and Pathology recently used DNA and other tests to determine whether or not the skulls of Saint Bridget (Birgitta) of Swedenand her daughter Katarina are authentic.

Medieval Irish abbots lived "life of O'Riley"

Ongoing excavations on the grounds of Rothe House in Kilkenny, Ireland, have discovered that Cistercian abbots, who had a previous residence at the site, lived a lavish lifestyle of roast swan and French wine.

[EAS] Royal University and Knights College

The Shire of Anglespur is proud to sponsor the East Kingdom Royal University and Knights college.

Early Chinese paintings subject of Freer & Sackler Galleries website

The Freer and Sackler Galleries of the Smithsonian Institution have announced a new online resource for the study of early Chinese painting. The site features over 80 examples of 10th through 14th century artwork.

New merchant: Paternoster Ladies opens its doors online

Paternoster Ladies recently opened their new online shopping portal, using the Etsy e-commerce hosting provider.

Paternoster Ladies

Paternoster Ladies produces one-of-a-kind handmade medieval rosaries, paternosters and chaplets for sale. Their line uses historically available materials to create items inspired by medieval sources such as museum examples and artwork of the time period. Many of their raw materials come from upcycling antique and vintage beads and findings, and the results are pure heaven.

Secret Vatican documents published

A collection of 105 documents, some dating back over 1,000 years, has been published in book form by the Vatican. The Vatican Secret Archives features a such diverse documents as a letter from the grandson of Genghis Khan to a 1550 note from Michelangelo demanding payment.

Strength of medieval women verified by bone study

Recent analysis of skeletons from Wharram Percy, a village on the Yorkshire Wolds, shows that the thick bones of the medieval women demonstrated a life of hard labor which built up their strength.

Lycanthropy and the Byzantines

Apparently the Byzantines had a werewolf problem, according to a new article by four scholars from the University of Athens. "Lycanthropy in Byzantine times ([CE] 330–1453)," looks at how doctors in the Empire dealt with patients who believed they were werewolves.

14th century coin found in York midden

Archaeological volunteers at York, England's Hungate Dig don't expect to find much, but Richard Daniel was lucky when he recently unearthed a 14th century gold coin.

SCA folk march in 2009 Fayetteville Rotary Christmas Parade

At 11:00 a.m., 12 December 2009, Members of the Canton of Attillium and the Barony of Windmaster's Hill participated in the 2009 Christmas Rotary Parade. This year two horses complete with armored riders, barding, lance and shield were introduced.

Treasure hunters lead researchers to 13th century Welsh manor

Metal detectorist John Lyon was thrilled to find a hoard of 44 coins dating to the 13th century in a farmyard near Pinchbeck, Wales, but the real discovery may be the source of the coins: a 13th century "well-built house" with a possible ecclesiastical connection.

Legacy of Puritan vandals still challenges Canterbury Cathedral

In the 1640s, followers of Oliver Cromwell vandalized Canterbury Cathedral, especially stained glass windows overlooking the tomb of Edward, Prince of Wales, known as the Black Prince. The decay continues to this day, causing concern to those charged with maintaining the cathedral.

Nuremberg Mahzor on display at the Israel Museum

In celebration of Rosh Hashana, the Jewish new Year, officials at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem are displaying the Nuremberg Mahzor, a 14th century collection of "handwritten Ashkenazi, or northern European, prayers and liturgical poems." The manuscript is considered the largest surviving text of its kind with only 7 of its 528 pages missing.