1301 CE to 1400 CE

Helena von Eltz elevated to Laurel in Drachenwald

Judith de Northumbria reports that Their Majesties UlfR and Caoimhe of the Kingdom of Drachenwald have chosen to offer Helena von Eltz entry into the Order of the Laurel.

Papers and artifacts of Richard II found by National Portrait Gallery archivist

Krzysztof Adamiec, the assistant archivist at the National Portrait Gallery, was given the assignment of cataloguing the papers of the Gallery’s first Director Sir George Scharf when he discovered something amazing: fragments and artifacts from the tomb of King Richard II.

Stirling Castle knight identified

The skeletal remains of a knight found at Stirling Castle in Scotland have been identified as those of English nobleman Sir John de Stricheley, who died in 1341. De Stricheley was probably killed by a Scottish arrow.

Tomb of medieval warrior found in Russia

Archaeologists have found the tomb of a 14th century soldier in the Adygeya region of Russia. The body was found with a saber and arrows along with other ornate grave goods.

Byward Angel scanned by medical imaging technique

A team of researchers is using Optical Coherence Tomography, a medical imaging technique, to study the Byward Angel, a well-preserved wall mural in the medieval section of the Tower of London. Expert believe the painting dates to the late 14th century. (video)

Plague orignated in China

Several new studies of the Bubonic Plague, which devasted Europe in the Middle Ages and the 17th century, have led researchers to the conclusion that the disease originated in China and was carried west over the Silk Road.

Ognissanti Crucifix determined a genuine Giotto

For centuries, a 14th century, painted cross, housed at the Ognissanti church in Florence, was considered to have been produced in a workshop, but prolonged restoration efforts have proven that the five-metre-high cross is a genuine Giotto. (photo)

Bird interrupts restoration of medieval bird house

Reconstruction of Sharlston Dovecote, a 14th century medieval pigeon house, is being planned around the property's resident barn owl. The owl likes to shelter there in the summer, so construction work will only proceed in the winter months.

Blitz reveals history of London's Charterhouse

A combination of Word War II blitz raids and centuries of urban renewal have wrought havoc on the 14th century medieval structures contained in London's Charterhouse. Some of the remaining medieval construction is detailed in a new book The Charterhouse (Yale, UK£80).

John Stow's history of London online

The Centre for Metropolitan History has made available the 1603 edition of John Stow's A Survey of London, edited by C. L. Kingsford. The work chronciles the history of the city from the 13th through the 16th centuries.

Scientists establish that Yersinia pestis caused Black Death in Europe

An international group of scientists has produced a new study establishing Yersinia pestis as "the etiologic agent of modern plague." The study is especially interested in the second pandemic or the "Black Death" which ravaged Europe from 1347 until 1750.

Dig hopes to uncover bones of 14th century Scottish bishop

A team of archaeologists is hoping to find the remains of Bernard of Kilwinning, the 14th century Scottish bishop who drafted the Declaration of Arbroath. The team is excavating a medieval monastery in the Ayrshire town of Kilwinning.

Welsh folklore for the iPhone

iPhone users and British folklore enthusiasts may want to download the iPhone app for the Mabinogion, a cycle of Welsh legends collected in the 14th century Red Book of Hergest.

Large medieval treasure found in Kastritsi floor

Bulgarian archaeologists are thrilled by the discovery of "one of the largest medieval treasures in recent times" embedded in the floor of a building in the medieval city of Kastritsi in Euxinograd.

Time Team and students aid in investigation of medieval hospital

The South Yorkshire town of Bawtry, England, became a center of archaeological interest recently when excavation of a disused car part revealed a dozen skeletons dating to the 14th century.

World of Khubilai Khan at the Met

September 28, 2010 - January 2, 2011, the Metropolitan Museum of Art will play host to The World of Khubilai Khan: Chinese Art in the Yuan Dynasty, an exhibit of fine and decorative art from the 13th and 14th centuries.

"New" edition of Chaucer's poems discovered

A professor in New Zealand has discovered a previously unknown edition of Chaucer's poems. The book was published in 1807 and distinguishes between poems correctly and incorrectly attributed to Chaucer. This is the earliest known edition to make such a distinction.

Battle of Crecy tutorial online

Baron Charles O'Connor of the Kingdom of Meridies reports that slides from his presentation on the Battle of Crecy, taught at a recent Meridies Royal University, are now available to view online.

Silver hoard found in Bulgaria

Archeologists have discovered a cache of 166 silver coins hidden in a jar in the floor of a medieval home. The home is within the fortress of Kastritsi.

Medieval skeletons found underneath parking lot

Archaeologists working in Bawtry, South Yorkshire, England, have unearthed dozens of skeletons dating to the 14th century. The skeletons are of all ages and are thought to be interred in a formal cemetery, possibly belonging to a hospital that was once thought to exist on the site.

Codex Manesse to be displayed in Heidelberg, Germany

In celebration of the 625-year anniversary of the University Library of Ruprecht-Karls-University in Heidelberg, Germany, the Codex Manesse, one of the most important manuscripts of the Middle Ages, will be exhibited at the library 26 October 2010 - 20 February 2011.

Knitted liripipe pattern

Alianora Munro has created a pattern for a "Fourteenth-Century Style Knitted Hood with Lirripipe." The pattern, with photo, is available on the Belfry Knits blog.

El Niño may have caused famine in medieval Europe

A new study by a team of scientists from the University of Miami finds that El Niño and La Niña may have caused cooling in the central Pacific, leading to drought in medieval Europe.

Rochester window "exciting find"

Graham Keevil believes the discovery of a 14th century window "punched through" an older Roman wall beneath Rochester Cathedral in Kent, England may be "one of his three most exciting finds."

Hurling takes root in the USA

During practice, members of the Worcester Hurling Club hit a sliotar (ball) with their hurleys (stick). That's Worcester, Massachusetts, not England.

Face of a 14th century knight revealed

State-of-the-art technology has been used to reconstruct the face of a medieval knight whose skeleton was discovered beneath Stirling Castle in Scotland. (photo)

Website traces European effigies

The Effigies and Brasses website offers links and images for numerous European effigies, brasses, incised slabs, half-reliefs, and other miscellaneous representations dating from the 12th-15th centuries.

Tournament of Friends II photos

And so the Great Tournament of Friends came and went. Four mounted warriors took the field and conducted several matches each. One mounted warrior, Fillipo Clemente Esposti, earned the title of Champion.

Jewish contributions to medieval Spain

“Uneasy Communion: Jews, Christians and the Altarpieces of Medieval Spain”  opened recently at the Museum of Biblical Art near New York's Lincoln Center. The exhibition takes a historical approach to Jewish contributions to Christian art in the two centuries before they were expelled from Spain by Queen Isabella in 1492.

"Dante's inferno", a new take on Hell

The marketers of Electronic Arts' videogame Dante's Inferno had an unusual rollout plan: self-protest the game, based on Dante Alighieri's 14th century work, as an evil, anti-Christian entertainment to drum up publicity for the game. Reviewers found Inferno to be less hellish and more of a dud. Mark Oppenheimer of the New York Times has the story.