1301 CE to 1400 CE

Discoveries of "Bulgarian Indiana Jones" on display in Sofia

The National Archaeology Institute museum in Sofia, Bulgaria is hosting a display of over 50 eartifacts discovered in the country in 2010. Among the finds were a 14th century gold earring and an 8th century silver coin.

Medieval Irish fishery victim of budget cuts

Archaeologists from the University College Dublin are unable to resume research on 14th century fishweirs near the Fergus Estuary in County Clare, Ireland which have been threatened by weather. The team blames budget cuts by the Irish Heritage Council. (photo)

14th century manuscript returns to Bangor Cathedral

Sunday worshippers at Bangor Cathedral in Wales were given a rare treat recently: they were permitted to view the Bangor Pontifical, "a 14th Century bishop's manuscript, containing blessings and text of plainchant." The manuscript had been absent from its home for preservation and digitalization. (photo)

14th century tales of Jean Froissart online

Steve Muhlberger (Duke Finvarr de Taahe of the Kingdom of Ealdormere) of the Department of History at Nipissing University has posted several tales, in English, written by Jean Froissart in the 14th century. The stories, which include romance, poetry and history, were aimed at an aristocratic audience.

Huge copy of the Koran to be digitized

A 500-year-old, handwritten copy of the Koran, owned by the University of Manchester's John Rylands Library, has been scheduled to be digitized and available online. The manuscript is the size of a large-screen television, and it is too fragile to be displayed. (photos)

"Season of the Witch: a 14th-century road movie with 21st-century cuss words"

Season of the Witch, the new Nicolas Cage costume drama set in medieval Europe, tells the story of two crusaders and the witch girl they are hired to transport to her doom. Jeannette Catsoulis of the New York Times has a review.

Luttrell Psalter available to view on British library website

Jasper C. of the Kingdom of Ansteorra reports that the entire Luttrell Psalter is available to view on the British Library website in Adobe Flash format.

HowToHistory.com offers free copies of Britain's oldest cookbook

HowToHistory.com, a website dedicated to creating and preserving video tutorials in the historic arts, recently found a documentary about The Forme of Cury. The interest was so great, the site obtained a public domain copy of the manuscript to give to their newsletter subscribers.

This week in barley: Two brewing discoveries in Germany

Thousands of charred barley grains have been found in ditches in the early Celtic settlement of Eberdingen-Hochdorf, Germany. The site may have been used to make beer for a nearby religious center.

Small town bands in the Middle Ages

Medievalists.net blog offers a link to an article by David M. Guion dealing with wind bands from the 14th through 19th centuries. The article, published in the Journal of Band Research, Vol.42 (2007) is entitled: Wind bands in towns, courts, and churches from the Middle Ages to the Baroque.

The role of teenagers in combat

Young combatants, who would be considered children by today's standards, were occasional warriors in medieval battle. In an online article Teenagers at War During the Middle Ages, Kelly DeVries looks at the roles of such youth in combat as the Black Prince and Joan of Arc and why they were so unusual.

Bangor Cathedral shares 14th century manuscript

In the first quarter of the 14th century, Anian 'Sais', the Bishop of Bangor in Wales, possessed a manuscript comprised of liturgical instructions and a substantial body of plainchant. Now, thanks to a collaboration between the University and Bangor Cathedral, the manuscript is available to view online.

Tower of Pisa restored and slightly straightened

An 8-year restoration of the Tower of Pisa has ended with the tower returned to its 1838 position, 46 cm (18 inches) more vertical than it was before. Extensive stone cleaning and restoration were also completed.

Indonesian fishermen find medieval shipwreck

Fishermen in Indonesia have found a shipwreck that probably dates to the 14th century. The wooden ship contains green and gray ceramics similar to what Chinese merchants traded at the time.

Medieval alabaster comes to Florida

Sixty pieces of alabaster sculpture from the Victoria & Albert Museum are going on display at the Society of Four Arts in Palm Beach, Florida (USA). The pieces date to the 14th and 15th century, and many still have original paint.

Boston art museum returns missing 14th century embroidery to Italy

The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston has returned a 14th century silk and metal embroidery to the Diocesan Museum of Trent, Italy. The stunning embroidery, entitled "The Entombment of Saint Vigilius," was commissioned by George of Liechtenstein in 1390.

Curator's favorites from British Museum online

James Robinson, Curator of of Late Medieval Collections at the British Museum, shares photos and information on some of his favorite pieces on the International Center for Medieval Art's online exhibition.

Helena von Eltz elevated to Laurel in Drachenwald

Judith de Northumbria reports that Their Majesties UlfR and Caoimhe of the Kingdom of Drachenwald have chosen to offer Helena von Eltz entry into the Order of the Laurel.

Papers and artifacts of Richard II found by National Portrait Gallery archivist

Krzysztof Adamiec, the assistant archivist at the National Portrait Gallery, was given the assignment of cataloguing the papers of the Gallery’s first Director Sir George Scharf when he discovered something amazing: fragments and artifacts from the tomb of King Richard II.

Stirling Castle knight identified

The skeletal remains of a knight found at Stirling Castle in Scotland have been identified as those of English nobleman Sir John de Stricheley, who died in 1341. De Stricheley was probably killed by a Scottish arrow.

Tomb of medieval warrior found in Russia

Archaeologists have found the tomb of a 14th century soldier in the Adygeya region of Russia. The body was found with a saber and arrows along with other ornate grave goods.

Byward Angel scanned by medical imaging technique

A team of researchers is using Optical Coherence Tomography, a medical imaging technique, to study the Byward Angel, a well-preserved wall mural in the medieval section of the Tower of London. Expert believe the painting dates to the late 14th century. (video)

Plague orignated in China

Several new studies of the Bubonic Plague, which devasted Europe in the Middle Ages and the 17th century, have led researchers to the conclusion that the disease originated in China and was carried west over the Silk Road.

Ognissanti Crucifix determined a genuine Giotto

For centuries, a 14th century, painted cross, housed at the Ognissanti church in Florence, was considered to have been produced in a workshop, but prolonged restoration efforts have proven that the five-metre-high cross is a genuine Giotto. (photo)

Bird interrupts restoration of medieval bird house

Reconstruction of Sharlston Dovecote, a 14th century medieval pigeon house, is being planned around the property's resident barn owl. The owl likes to shelter there in the summer, so construction work will only proceed in the winter months.

Blitz reveals history of London's Charterhouse

A combination of Word War II blitz raids and centuries of urban renewal have wrought havoc on the 14th century medieval structures contained in London's Charterhouse. Some of the remaining medieval construction is detailed in a new book The Charterhouse (Yale, UK£80).

John Stow's history of London online

The Centre for Metropolitan History has made available the 1603 edition of John Stow's A Survey of London, edited by C. L. Kingsford. The work chronciles the history of the city from the 13th through the 16th centuries.

Scientists establish that Yersinia pestis caused Black Death in Europe

An international group of scientists has produced a new study establishing Yersinia pestis as "the etiologic agent of modern plague." The study is especially interested in the second pandemic or the "Black Death" which ravaged Europe from 1347 until 1750.

Dig hopes to uncover bones of 14th century Scottish bishop

A team of archaeologists is hoping to find the remains of Bernard of Kilwinning, the 14th century Scottish bishop who drafted the Declaration of Arbroath. The team is excavating a medieval monastery in the Ayrshire town of Kilwinning.

Welsh folklore for the iPhone

iPhone users and British folklore enthusiasts may want to download the iPhone app for the Mabinogion, a cycle of Welsh legends collected in the 14th century Red Book of Hergest.