1301 CE to 1400 CE

Detailed map created of underwater town in England

Archaeologists have created a detailed map of the medieval port city of Dunwich, dubbed "Britain's Atlantis" because it sank into the sea centuries ago.  Using both high-tech imaging and historic research, archaeologists have been able to map out the town boundaries, streets, and even identify individual buildings.

Scientists find that same bacterium caused Justinianic plague and Black Plague

In 2011, DNA evidence confirmed that the infamous Black Plague that ravaged Europe in the 14th century was, as had been suspected for many years, caused by the Yersinia Pestis bacterium. Now a team of scientists have used skeletal microbiology and DNA testing to show that a 6th through 8th century pandemic was caused by the same bacterium.

14th century Expositiones Vocabulorum Biblie comes home

A 14th century, hand-written copy of the Expositiones Vocabulorum Biblie has returned to its place of origin after surviving the Dissolution of the Monasteries under Henry VIII in the 1530s. The parchment manuscript, which was created to help the nuns of Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire study and understand the Bible, is now on display at the abbey thanks to the National Trust which purchased the document at auction. (photos)

Little footprints on the pages of history

Somewhere in 14th century Croatia, a scribe must have had a few choice words for his pet cat after kitty left his little paw marks on the pages of the scholar's book. The discovery was made by Ph.D student Emir O. Filipović in the Dubrovnik State Archives. (photo)

Plague burial discovered in London construction project

In the 14th century, Charterhouse Square in London was no-man's land, making it an excellent place to bury victims of the Black Plague. Now the site is the focus of archaeological investigations after being unearthed during construction of the city's Crossrail project. (video)

Delights from Richard's table

Popular British chef, and "self-confessed medieval foodie," Clarissa Dickson Wright takes on the cooking of the 14th century when she prepares dishes from Britain's oldest known cookbook, The Forme of Cury, written during the reign of King Richard II.

Medieval road found under Lincoln

Six feet below street level in the center of Lincoln, England lies a medieval road, complete with wheel ruts, and bounded by a large building, such as a warehouse. Now archaeologists are faced with the task of discovering all they can about the site in six weeks before construction begins on a new store.

Remains of Teutonic knights identified in Poland

The remains of three medieval Grand Masters of the Teutonic Knights, unearthed in Poland in 2007, have been identified. The men were named Werner von Orseln, Ludolf Koenig, and Heinrich von Plauen.

History of Reading Abbey on display for first time

A manuscript chronicling the history of Reading Abbey is on display for the first time at the Berkshire Records Office in Reading, England. The manuscript, consisting of parchment folios bound into a book, was created in the 1340s, and was purchased from a private owner for UK£36,000.

Red Comyn's pendant found in Scottish field

“It’s the find of a lifetime. I’ve been searching for historic gems for more than 30 years and found nothing like this.," said John Eldridge from North Berwick, who used a metal detector to find a 14th century harness pendant belonging to Sir John Comyn in a field near Loch Leven Castle in Scotland. (photo)

London rail excavations unearth plague graves

Digging for a new rail line in london, England has revelaed a mass grave with 13 skeletons in it. Dates based on pottery indicate that the graves date to the mid 1300s.

Another Knightly Skeleton Found in Car Park

The grave of a medieval warrior has been unearthed under a Scottish car park.   The site was originally that of a 13th-century monastery.

Swiss farmer relieved of 14th century debt

In 1357, A Swiss land owner, Konrad Müller, killed another town resident. In restitution, Müller pledged to provide for a sanctuary lamp at the Catholic church of Näfels. Finally the debt, passed perpetually to his heirs, has been declared invalid.

What Is On That Comb?!?

The decoration of "leaves" on what was thought to be a medieval pilgrim badge of St Blaise was actually something else!

Hope for the ancient manuscripts of Timbuktu

Last week news outlets reported that militant Islamic rebels fleeing Timbuktu in Mali had torched a new library, destroying many of the city's famed ancient books. Preservationists and the Mali government are now reporting that many of the manuscripts were hidden in a safe house before the attack.

Cold weather not reason for Viking abandonment of Greenland

A recent study by a team of Danish-Canadian scientists rules out cold weather as the reason that the Vikings abandoned their settlements in Greenland in the 15th century. When cold destroyed crops, say the experts, the settlers just changed their diets to seal meat.

Hereford Mappa Mundi removed for conservation evaluation

A 700-year-old map of the world, the Hereford Mappa Mundi, has been removed from display in Hereford Cathedral for evaluation of its condition. The 52 in. (132cm) circular map shows a medieval view of the world with Jerusalem at the center and Paradise "surrounded by a wall and a ring of fire, roughly where Japan would be." (photos)

Tamerlane the Disabled

Tartar warlord Tamerlane may have been the greatest conqueror of all, outshining Genghis Khan and Alexander the Great, but few recognize the fact that the great warrior was severely disabled in his youth. The BBC features Tamerlane in an article for Disability History Month.

Inability to adapt not the cause of demise of the Vikings

One of the theories about the demise of Viking settlers on Greenland was that the Norse were unable to adapt to the island's harsh climate, but Danish and Canadian researchers believe that was not the cause.

Adopt a spire in Milan

Philantropists around the world have been invited to "adopt" a spire of the 14th century cathedral in Milan, Italy. For the gift of 100,000 euros (UK£80,000), donors will receive the right to have their names inscribed on one of the church's 135 spires.

Manx Museum to display 14th century bishop's seal

In February 2012, metal detectorist Andy Falconer discovered a silver seal on te Isle of Man in England. The seal was identified by the Manx Museum as a 14th-century bishop's seal, and have now placed the important artifact on display. (photo)

Norwegian copper smelter "surprisingly sophisticated"

On an island in a small river in Norway's Nord-Trøndelag County, archaeologists have discovered a 14th-century copper smeltery. “This is the first evidence that copper was produced from copper ore in Norway during the Middle Ages,” says Associate Professor Lars F. Stenvik, at the Museum of Natural History and Archaeology in Trondheim.

Viking outpost on Baffin Island?

At a conference in October 2012, archaeologist Patricia Sutherland announced that new evidence has been found of a Viking outpost on Canada's Baffin Island.

Archaeologists ask for police help to uncover Bannockburn story

Stirling Council archaeologist Murray Cook has made an unusual request of the Central Scotland Police headquarters at Randolphfield, Stirling to allow experts to search the police grounds for evidence of the location of the Battle of Bannockburn.

Archaeologists find evidence from "one of the saddest hours in Scottish history"

An archaeology team in Stracathro, Scotland were working on a Roman fort when they discovered something very interesting: The possible ruins of the church where John Balliol abdicated his throne to Edward I in 1296.

Wind farm could save Lochindorb Castle

A 17-turbine wind farm could be the benefactor of a 14th century Scottish castle if a project proposal from Infinergy is successful. Lochindorb Castle, the home of Alexander Stewart, the Wolf of Badenoch, is owned by Cawdor Estates, a partner in the venture. (photo)

African king is history's richest man

Bill Gates who? CelebrityNetWorth has named Mansa Musa I, the 14th century leader of the Empire of Mali, the richest man of all time, with a personal worth of over US$400 billion.  Mali's role as supplier of salt and gold to much of the known world made the king rich and Mali an economic superpower.

Possible second New World Viking site discovered on Baffin Island

Artifacts from an excavation on Baffin Island, Canada have yielded evidence that the Vikings may have had a settlement there in the 14th century. Evidence includes traces of bronze, European-style stonework and tools, Old World rat pelts, and yarn similar to that made in Greenland at the same time.

Anthropologist analyzes effects of the Black Death

USC professor Sharon DeWitte is steeped in death, specifically the Black Death that ravaged Europe during the 14th century. DeWitte is studying how conditions in Europe before and after the plague and the effects of the disease on the lifespan of survivors changed life in medieval Europe.

York Mystery Plays community project

"At times you feel like you're looking at a huge film set with masses of people on stage, all pulling in the same direction, creating big pictures," says director Paul Burbridge about a new production of the 14th century York Mystery Plays.