1301 CE to 1400 CE

14th Century Palace Located Outside Glasgow

After decades of searching, the ruins of the Bishop of Glasgow's palace have been discovered outside the city. The 13th century building stood for three centuries before being destroyed in the Reformation.

German "Swamp Girl's" Skeleton Tells Tale

A skeleton found in a German swamp proved to belong to a 15-year-old girl who lived 650 years ago.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 12, 1334

Giotto di Bondone was appointed Chief Architect of Florence Cathedral on April 12, 1334. He designed a bell tower for the Cathedral, but it was not finished until after his death.

Mapping 14th Century Britain

Mapping the Realm: English Catrographic Constructions of Fourteenth-Century Britain is an interactive online version of England's Gough Map.

Black Plague Caused Climate Change

A new study suggests that the devastating Black Death may have done more than wipe out 1/3 of the population. It may have triggered Europe's "Little Ice Age" in the 14th century.

Researchers Debate Fate of 14th Century Ship

Archaeologists in Stockholm, Sweden are debating the best method to handle a 14th century ship discovered buried in the mud of a bay in central Stockholm. Parts of the ship may be too delicate to remove.

Chaucer's Blog

A product of an overactive imagination or just someone with too much time on their hands, Geoffrey Chaucer Hath A Blog is now available online.

Museums Battle over Medieval Pitcher

A small museum is locked in a battle to keep a medieval jug dating possibly to the 14th century in the UK. Luton Museum Services has a month to raise £750,000 to match the price offered by New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art for the Wenlok Jug.

New Work by Constance Hieatt

SCA members might be interested to know that MRTS is publishing a new work by Constance Hieatt on medieval cookery. Co-authors include two Society members.

Geoffrey Chaucer Hath A Blogge

Geoffrey Chaucer giveth advice, posteth the toppe X searches inn hys netwerk, and "the privitees of the manye abbreviaciouns ywritten on the internette". BSL (by seinte loy!) Thou shalt be ROFL ("rollinge on the floore laughinge").

Murder in Sweden

700 years after it happened, the cause of death of Sweden's oldest human skeleten has been determined: he was murdered!

Time changes modern human's face

Modern people possess less prominent features but higher foreheads than our medieval ancestors, according to research on the changes to the shape of the human skull over the past 650 years.

Ming Dynasty Village Discovered

A 14th century, Ming Dynasty village has been discovered near Anshun City in China's Guizhou Province. The well-preserved ancient village was known as Baojiatun.

Dante quiz helps sinners find their future home in Hell

Have you been bad? Very bad? Dante Alighieri has an eternal home for you. Use this quiz to find out which of his seven levels of Hell you will inhabit. [PG-13]

Wallace Execution Headlined Medieval Fair

The execution of Scottish hero William Wallace appears to have been the opening act for a medieval carnival in August of 1305.

Fra Angelico One Step Closer to Sainthood

Fra Angelico was the model of a self-effacing medieval monk whose art was an expression of religion. Pope John Paul II beatified the 14th century monk, bringing him one step closer to sainthood, and his name and his genius are still celebrated 550 years later.

Farmer Restoring Ancient Woodlands Unearths Pits Dating to 1350 A.D.

As Britain celebrates the 30th anniversary of National Tree Week, one Cumbrian farmer is making a valuable contribution to the regeneration of the county's woodland - and uncovering some fascinating facts about the region's industrial heritage into the process, as well as pits dating back to 1350 A.D.

Village of Sundkøbing Re-Creates Medieval Danish Life

The Medieval Centre in Denmark re-creates life in the 14th century village of Sundkøbing, complete with trebuchet and artillery demonstrations, a market and craftsmen.

"Queen Isabella: Treachery, Adultery, and Murder in Medieval England"

Alida Becker of the New York Times Book Review looks at Queen Isabella: Treachery, Adultery, and Murder in Medieval England, a book by Alison Weir.

Monastery Reconstruction Restores 10th Century Building

700 years after it was looted by Catalan mercenaries, Vatopedi Monastery in northern Greece will celebrate a two-year restoration project funded by the Catalan administration.

Sweet History

How sweet it is! Diana A. Galang looks at the history of candy in an article for the Manilla Bulletin.

New exhibit on the art of Prague and Bohemia at the Met

"Prague, The Crown of Bohemia, 1347-1437" will be on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through January 3.

Campaign to "Save the Monument" Launched

A group of William Wallace enthusiasts have set out to save and preserve the site where the Scottish hero was betrayed. The site, near Glasgow, has become a dumping ground and popular haunt of drug users.

Georgian Tribes Loved their Wine

New excavations of wine cellars near Atskuri, Georgia reveal that Georgian tribes from the early Middle Ages worshiped wine. The wine cellars were found during construction of a gas pipeline.

Medieval Charnal House Restored in English Basement

A 14th century English home, owned by a lawyer, has a secret in its basement: It is the final resting place of some 10,000 of London's dead.

Drumin Castle to Re-Open to the Public

Drumin Castle, the 14th century home of the notorious "Wolf of Badenoch," is set to re-open to the public after extensive restoration. The fortress is located on the Glenlivet Estate in Moray, Scotland.

Medieval "Gate of Granada" Guarded Gibraltar

Archaeologists from the Gibraltar Museum have discovered the pillars of the Gate of Granada, the 14th century main entrance to the city.

A Man Walked into the Casbah: 13th Century Persian Jokes

Humor is ageless, or so believes John Emerson in his weblog 700 Year Old Jokes, a collection of humorous stories from a 13th century Persian Bishop.

Did Dante Discover Law of Motion Before Galileo?

In an article for Nature, Leonardo Ricci, of the University of Trento, writes that poet Dante Alighieri described the law of motion in physics 300 years before Galileo.

Wallace's Sword Travels to New York

A double-handed sword used by Scottish hero William Wallace left Scotland for New York, where it was the centerpiece of an exhibit at New York's Grand Central Station.