1301 CE to 1400 CE

"The World of Chaucer" Online

A web version of The World of Chaucer: Medieval Books and Manuscripts is now available on the website of the University of Glasgow. The site includes reproductions of manuscripts from the exhibition catalog.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 9, 1365

King Pedro of Castile, called "the Cruel," was excommunicated by the Pope on June 9, 1365 for his treatment of the clergy.

Website Offers Fifteenth Century English Patents of Arms

A website gives examples, both text and graphical, of English patents and grants of arms awarded in the 14th and 15th centuries.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 9, 1386

On May 9, 1386, England and Portugal signed the Treaty of Windsor, a pledge of mutual assistance which remains in effect to this day.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 8, 1373

Seriously ill, Dame Julian of Norwich had a series of visions of Christ's love on May 8, 1373. She spent years in contemplation of their meaning, finally producing Revelations of Divine Love, the first known English book written by a woman.

Swallowfield Manor in Berkshire for Sale

Swallowfield Manor, a 17th century house with moated 13th century gardens bordering the River Loddon, is for sale.

"Substantial Medieval Buildings" Unearthed Near York

Archaeologists from Humber Field Archaeology have unearthed "revealing traces of substantial medieval buildings 'which could prove to be an inn which may have welcomed pilgrims who journeyed far and wide to visit the historic town.'"

Today in the Middle Ages: April 22, 1348

The legendary dropped-underwear incident that led to the founding of England's highest order of knighthood is said to have happened on April 22, 1348.

Largest Medieval Parish Cemetery Outside London Excavated

Members of the University of Leicester archaeology unit are excavating a large parish cemetery containing over 1,300 skeletons that date from between 1200 and 1600 CE.

14th Century Palace Located Outside Glasgow

After decades of searching, the ruins of the Bishop of Glasgow's palace have been discovered outside the city. The 13th century building stood for three centuries before being destroyed in the Reformation.

German "Swamp Girl's" Skeleton Tells Tale

A skeleton found in a German swamp proved to belong to a 15-year-old girl who lived 650 years ago.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 12, 1334

Giotto di Bondone was appointed Chief Architect of Florence Cathedral on April 12, 1334. He designed a bell tower for the Cathedral, but it was not finished until after his death.

Mapping 14th Century Britain

Mapping the Realm: English Catrographic Constructions of Fourteenth-Century Britain is an interactive online version of England's Gough Map.

Black Plague Caused Climate Change

A new study suggests that the devastating Black Death may have done more than wipe out 1/3 of the population. It may have triggered Europe's "Little Ice Age" in the 14th century.

Researchers Debate Fate of 14th Century Ship

Archaeologists in Stockholm, Sweden are debating the best method to handle a 14th century ship discovered buried in the mud of a bay in central Stockholm. Parts of the ship may be too delicate to remove.

Chaucer's Blog

A product of an overactive imagination or just someone with too much time on their hands, Geoffrey Chaucer Hath A Blog is now available online.

Museums Battle over Medieval Pitcher

A small museum is locked in a battle to keep a medieval jug dating possibly to the 14th century in the UK. Luton Museum Services has a month to raise £750,000 to match the price offered by New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art for the Wenlok Jug.

New Work by Constance Hieatt

SCA members might be interested to know that MRTS is publishing a new work by Constance Hieatt on medieval cookery. Co-authors include two Society members.

Geoffrey Chaucer Hath A Blogge

Geoffrey Chaucer giveth advice, posteth the toppe X searches inn hys netwerk, and "the privitees of the manye abbreviaciouns ywritten on the internette". BSL (by seinte loy!) Thou shalt be ROFL ("rollinge on the floore laughinge").

Murder in Sweden

700 years after it happened, the cause of death of Sweden's oldest human skeleten has been determined: he was murdered!

Time changes modern human's face

Modern people possess less prominent features but higher foreheads than our medieval ancestors, according to research on the changes to the shape of the human skull over the past 650 years.

Ming Dynasty Village Discovered

A 14th century, Ming Dynasty village has been discovered near Anshun City in China's Guizhou Province. The well-preserved ancient village was known as Baojiatun.

Dante quiz helps sinners find their future home in Hell

Have you been bad? Very bad? Dante Alighieri has an eternal home for you. Use this quiz to find out which of his seven levels of Hell you will inhabit. [PG-13]

Wallace Execution Headlined Medieval Fair

The execution of Scottish hero William Wallace appears to have been the opening act for a medieval carnival in August of 1305.

Fra Angelico One Step Closer to Sainthood

Fra Angelico was the model of a self-effacing medieval monk whose art was an expression of religion. Pope John Paul II beatified the 14th century monk, bringing him one step closer to sainthood, and his name and his genius are still celebrated 550 years later.

Farmer Restoring Ancient Woodlands Unearths Pits Dating to 1350 A.D.

As Britain celebrates the 30th anniversary of National Tree Week, one Cumbrian farmer is making a valuable contribution to the regeneration of the county's woodland - and uncovering some fascinating facts about the region's industrial heritage into the process, as well as pits dating back to 1350 A.D.

Village of Sundkøbing Re-Creates Medieval Danish Life

The Medieval Centre in Denmark re-creates life in the 14th century village of Sundkøbing, complete with trebuchet and artillery demonstrations, a market and craftsmen.

"Queen Isabella: Treachery, Adultery, and Murder in Medieval England"

Alida Becker of the New York Times Book Review looks at Queen Isabella: Treachery, Adultery, and Murder in Medieval England, a book by Alison Weir.

Monastery Reconstruction Restores 10th Century Building

700 years after it was looted by Catalan mercenaries, Vatopedi Monastery in northern Greece will celebrate a two-year restoration project funded by the Catalan administration.

Sweet History

How sweet it is! Diana A. Galang looks at the history of candy in an article for the Manilla Bulletin.