1301 CE to 1400 CE

Round Table Building Discovered at Windsor Castle

Channel 4's Time Team may have discovered evidence of the existence of the original round table at Windsor Castle. The team has found some evidence of a round structure built by Edward III constructed to house the table and the original 300 Knights of the Garter.

Saxon and Norman Artifacts Found in Southampton Dig

Excavation of a future construction site in Southampton, UK produced artifacts from the eleventh, fourteenth and twentieth centuries.

Record Price for 14th-century English Coin

One of only three known Edward III double florins went for UK£460,000 at Spink auction house. The coin has a face value of six shillings.

The Plantagenets and Crecy

In an article in Primitive Archer Magazine, Gene Langston looks at the Battle of Crecy and the Plantagenet influence on historical archery.

Today in the Middle Ages: July 11, 1302

Insurgent Flemish peasants shocked the chivalry of Europe by defeating the occupying French cavalry at Courtrai (modern Kortrijk) on July 11, 1302.

Medieval Code Ring Brings Wealth and Glory to Metal Detector

Metal detector enthusiast John Wood certainly didn't expect to strike it rich four years ago when he discovered an odd-looking gold ring, but the 650-year-old artifact is now set to sell at Christies for UK£100,000.

Today in the Middle Ages: July 10, 1376

The "Good Parliament" ended in London on July 10, 1376. It was nicknamed by the people of England in recognition of its efforts to end corruption at court.

Today in the Middle Ages: July 9, 1386

John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, ancestor of English kings, sailed for Spain on July 9, 1386.

Today in the Middle Ages: July 2, 1323

Dame Alice Kyteler of Kilkenny was found guilty of practicing witchcraft on July 2, 1323.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 22, 1400

On June 22, 1400, Owain Glyndwr and his allies defeated in the English in the Battle of Bryn Glas.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 20, 1367

On June 20, 1367, King Edward III of England awarded Geoffrey Chaucer an annual pension and the position of valet at court.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 15, 1330

Edward the Black Prince was born on June 15, 1330.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 14, 1325

On June 14, 1325, Ibn Batuta left his native Tangier on pilgrimage to Mecca. He was not to return for 29 years.

"The World of Chaucer" Online

A web version of The World of Chaucer: Medieval Books and Manuscripts is now available on the website of the University of Glasgow. The site includes reproductions of manuscripts from the exhibition catalog.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 9, 1365

King Pedro of Castile, called "the Cruel," was excommunicated by the Pope on June 9, 1365 for his treatment of the clergy.

Website Offers Fifteenth Century English Patents of Arms

A website gives examples, both text and graphical, of English patents and grants of arms awarded in the 14th and 15th centuries.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 9, 1386

On May 9, 1386, England and Portugal signed the Treaty of Windsor, a pledge of mutual assistance which remains in effect to this day.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 8, 1373

Seriously ill, Dame Julian of Norwich had a series of visions of Christ's love on May 8, 1373. She spent years in contemplation of their meaning, finally producing Revelations of Divine Love, the first known English book written by a woman.

Swallowfield Manor in Berkshire for Sale

Swallowfield Manor, a 17th century house with moated 13th century gardens bordering the River Loddon, is for sale.

"Substantial Medieval Buildings" Unearthed Near York

Archaeologists from Humber Field Archaeology have unearthed "revealing traces of substantial medieval buildings 'which could prove to be an inn which may have welcomed pilgrims who journeyed far and wide to visit the historic town.'"

Today in the Middle Ages: April 22, 1348

The legendary dropped-underwear incident that led to the founding of England's highest order of knighthood is said to have happened on April 22, 1348.

Largest Medieval Parish Cemetery Outside London Excavated

Members of the University of Leicester archaeology unit are excavating a large parish cemetery containing over 1,300 skeletons that date from between 1200 and 1600 CE.

14th Century Palace Located Outside Glasgow

After decades of searching, the ruins of the Bishop of Glasgow's palace have been discovered outside the city. The 13th century building stood for three centuries before being destroyed in the Reformation.

German "Swamp Girl's" Skeleton Tells Tale

A skeleton found in a German swamp proved to belong to a 15-year-old girl who lived 650 years ago.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 12, 1334

Giotto di Bondone was appointed Chief Architect of Florence Cathedral on April 12, 1334. He designed a bell tower for the Cathedral, but it was not finished until after his death.

Mapping 14th Century Britain

Mapping the Realm: English Catrographic Constructions of Fourteenth-Century Britain is an interactive online version of England's Gough Map.

Black Plague Caused Climate Change

A new study suggests that the devastating Black Death may have done more than wipe out 1/3 of the population. It may have triggered Europe's "Little Ice Age" in the 14th century.

Researchers Debate Fate of 14th Century Ship

Archaeologists in Stockholm, Sweden are debating the best method to handle a 14th century ship discovered buried in the mud of a bay in central Stockholm. Parts of the ship may be too delicate to remove.

Chaucer's Blog

A product of an overactive imagination or just someone with too much time on their hands, Geoffrey Chaucer Hath A Blog is now available online.

Museums Battle over Medieval Pitcher

A small museum is locked in a battle to keep a medieval jug dating possibly to the 14th century in the UK. Luton Museum Services has a month to raise £750,000 to match the price offered by New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art for the Wenlok Jug.