1301 CE to 1400 CE

New sources on the Battle of Crécy

The October 2013 issue of History Today magazine features an article by Richard Barber which looks at recently discovered sources on the Battle of Crécy (1346). An excerpt from Edward III and the Battle of Crécy is available free online. The entire article is reserved for subscribers to the magazine. (photo)

Scottish battle anniversaries focus of tourism industry

September 9, 2013 marked the 500th anniversary of the Battle of Flodden (the English won), while 2014 will be the 700th anniversary of the Battle of Bannockburn (the Scots took that one), two events destined to bring tourists flocking to Scotland and northern England. Sophie Campbell of The Telegraph has a feature story.

A Walsingham Pilgrimage

The village of Little Walsingham in North Norfolk was the site for a major pilgrimage during the 14th and 15th centuries. What still exists today of that ancient site? Take a virtual trip back to this shrine. (photos)

First of Leicester's double coffins opened

While the impact of the Leicester car park's second most interesting find will not not be as great as the discovery of the remains of Richard III, archaeologists are still excited about the mysterious coffin-within-a-coffin found at the site. The lid of the first, stone coffin was lifted recently to reveal an inner lead coffin, which was removed for further analysis. (photo)

Laws of Hywel Dda online

Last year, the 14th century book, the Laws of Hywel Dda, was purchased at auction by the National Library of Wales and brought home after nearly 300 years in exile in the United States. Now the book is on display at the library in Aberystwyth, and available for all to see online.

Archaeologists consider meaning of Mingary Castle arrowhead

Mingary Castle, overlooking the Sound of Mull in Scotland, may have had a more violent past than once believed, according to experts pondering the discovery of an iron arrowhead. (photo)

Happy birthday, Giovanni Boccaccio

Through 20 December 2013, the University of Manchester and Bristol will celebrate the 700th anniversary of the birth of Giovanni Boccaccio, author of the 1351 Decameron, a collection of 100 tales ranging from the erotic to the tragic, with an exhibition.

The history of the octothorpe and more

Modern social networkers will recognize the octothrope as the opening character of a hashtag, but the lowly punctuation mark has a noble history. In his book, Shady Characters: The Secret Life of Punctuation, Symbols & Other Typographical Marks, Keith Houston looks at punctuation marks' roots from Greek, Roman and 14th century texts.

Ottoman armor plate found at Perperikon

In 1361, the Thracian city of Perperikon, now in Bulgaria, was besieged by the Ottoman Turks. Among the artifacts found during recent excavations of the site was a bronze plate, believed to have been part of the armor of an Ottoman commander.

"Formal Combats in the Fourteenth Century" available for Kindle

Steven Muhlberger reports that his book Formal Combats in the Fourteenth Century in now available for the Kindle from Amazon.com in eBook format. Cost to download is US $3.99.

Lottery money to help Chester Farm

2,000 years of English history will be open for study thanks to a UK£4m grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund to restore and investigate various sites at Chester Farm, in Irchester, England.

Drum Castle's "chamber of secrets"

For centuries, a secret medieval chamber, complete with its own guarderobe, lay hidden behind the walls of Drum Castle near Banchory, Scotland, but now all has been revealed. The room appears to have been covered during later renovations. Drum, home of Clan Irvine, is Scotland's oldest castle.

Unique horse harness found at Cork castle dig

Archaeologists working on excavations at Caherduggan, near Doneraile, Co Cork, Ireland, have discovered a gilt-covered leather harness with heraldic symbols dating to the 13th-14th century, the only "intact example ever found in Britain or Ireland."

Fourteenth-Century Poison Ring Found in Bulgaria

Made of bronze, the ring appears to be made for a man's little finger and has a hidden "exit hole" where the poison could be poured out.

Leicester site reveals double coffin

The now famous car park in Leicester, England has revealed another interesting find - a stone coffin containing another lead coffin. This is the same site where Richard III's remains were found in 2012.

Golden Horde site in jeopardy from flooding

Saraichik, a medieval trade center of the Golden Horde in Kazakhstan, has withstood the Mongols, the Turks, and the Cossacks, but now the ancient trade city faces a worse fate: Mother Nature. The few buildings left at the site have been ravished by floods from the Ural River and beaten by storms.

Wrecked merchant ship salvaged off coast of Vietnam

After five long months of battling sand and seawater off the coast of the Binh Son district in Vietnam, experts have recovered a wealth of 14th century artifacts from a shipwreck, possibly associated with the silk and pottery road.

"Dear Edward, Leave the Scots alone!"

A copy of a previously unknown letter from Robert the Bruce to King Edward II has been discovered at the British Library. The letter, written in 1310 during the build-up to the Battle of Bannockburn, requests that Edward recognise Scottish independence and end persecution of its people. (video)

Detailed map created of underwater town in England

Archaeologists have created a detailed map of the medieval port city of Dunwich, dubbed "Britain's Atlantis" because it sank into the sea centuries ago.  Using both high-tech imaging and historic research, archaeologists have been able to map out the town boundaries, streets, and even identify individual buildings.

Scientists find that same bacterium caused Justinianic plague and Black Plague

In 2011, DNA evidence confirmed that the infamous Black Plague that ravaged Europe in the 14th century was, as had been suspected for many years, caused by the Yersinia Pestis bacterium. Now a team of scientists have used skeletal microbiology and DNA testing to show that a 6th through 8th century pandemic was caused by the same bacterium.

14th century Expositiones Vocabulorum Biblie comes home

A 14th century, hand-written copy of the Expositiones Vocabulorum Biblie has returned to its place of origin after surviving the Dissolution of the Monasteries under Henry VIII in the 1530s. The parchment manuscript, which was created to help the nuns of Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire study and understand the Bible, is now on display at the abbey thanks to the National Trust which purchased the document at auction. (photos)

Little footprints on the pages of history

Somewhere in 14th century Croatia, a scribe must have had a few choice words for his pet cat after kitty left his little paw marks on the pages of the scholar's book. The discovery was made by Ph.D student Emir O. Filipović in the Dubrovnik State Archives. (photo)

Plague burial discovered in London construction project

In the 14th century, Charterhouse Square in London was no-man's land, making it an excellent place to bury victims of the Black Plague. Now the site is the focus of archaeological investigations after being unearthed during construction of the city's Crossrail project. (video)

Delights from Richard's table

Popular British chef, and "self-confessed medieval foodie," Clarissa Dickson Wright takes on the cooking of the 14th century when she prepares dishes from Britain's oldest known cookbook, The Forme of Cury, written during the reign of King Richard II.

Medieval road found under Lincoln

Six feet below street level in the center of Lincoln, England lies a medieval road, complete with wheel ruts, and bounded by a large building, such as a warehouse. Now archaeologists are faced with the task of discovering all they can about the site in six weeks before construction begins on a new store.

Remains of Teutonic knights identified in Poland

The remains of three medieval Grand Masters of the Teutonic Knights, unearthed in Poland in 2007, have been identified. The men were named Werner von Orseln, Ludolf Koenig, and Heinrich von Plauen.

History of Reading Abbey on display for first time

A manuscript chronicling the history of Reading Abbey is on display for the first time at the Berkshire Records Office in Reading, England. The manuscript, consisting of parchment folios bound into a book, was created in the 1340s, and was purchased from a private owner for UK£36,000.

Red Comyn's pendant found in Scottish field

“It’s the find of a lifetime. I’ve been searching for historic gems for more than 30 years and found nothing like this.," said John Eldridge from North Berwick, who used a metal detector to find a 14th century harness pendant belonging to Sir John Comyn in a field near Loch Leven Castle in Scotland. (photo)

London rail excavations unearth plague graves

Digging for a new rail line in london, England has revelaed a mass grave with 13 skeletons in it. Dates based on pottery indicate that the graves date to the mid 1300s.

Another Knightly Skeleton Found in Car Park

The grave of a medieval warrior has been unearthed under a Scottish car park.   The site was originally that of a 13th-century monastery.