New York Times

"Nasta’liq: The Genius of Persian Calligraphy" at the Sackler

Islamic art does not depict the human form, but it often finds its greatest inspiration in calligraphy. A new exhibit at the Sackler Gallery in Washington D.C. is devoted to nasta’liq, Persian calligraphy developed from the 14th to 16th centuries. Nasta’liq: The Genius of Persian Calligraphy will be featured at the gallery from September 13, 2014 through March 22, 2015.

Crusaders still exist in Malta

Crusaders still exist on the islands of Malta, where reporter Elisabeth Eaves of the New York Times spoke with one for a feature article.

Shakespeare: Women in tights

From Sarah Bernhardt to Helen Mirren, women have longed from - and won - the meaty male parts in Shakespeare's plays. New York Times columnist Alexis Soloski looks at women playing Shakespearean heroes in a recent article.

The historic beauty of Rouen

Rouen, france is the home of the Cathedral Notre-Dame de Rouen and of Gustave Flaubert, the spot where Joan of Arc was burned and where painters Claude Monet and Roy Lichtenstein were inspired. Nell Casey of the New York Times visited the city and writes of its beauty. (photos)

New York Times Explores Chivalry

A prominent member of the SCA recently got to speak out on the topic of chivalry in the New York Times' Opinion page, in the on-line forum called "Room For Debate." The question of the day that the Times posed was: Could there be a revival of chivalry, or should this noble ideal be allowed to fade into obscurity?

Tolkien and Arthur

In the early 1930s J. R. R. Tolkien, author of the Lord of the Rings trilogy and the Hobbit, began what was to have been an epic, narrative poem, The Fall of Arthur, only to abandon the work in 1937. Now the incomplete poem has been published, edited by Tolkien's son Christopher.

Anne Boleyn redux

In her new book, The Creation of Anne Boleyn, author Susan Bordo aims to "strip away all the 'sedimented mythology turned into history by decades of repetition' and to restore a restless, learned, freethinking and ambitious but nondemonic woman to the throne of the public imagination." Jennifer Schuessler of the New York Times has a review.

Brat and brew in Old Town Nuremberg

A walk through old town Nuremberg, Germany takes visitors back in time to the Middle Ages. An 11th century castle, toy museum, the home of Albrecht Dürer and over six acres of brewing tradition make for a memorial travel location. Russ Juskalian of the New York Times Travel section has the story.

The science of discovery

Historians have long been fascinated by the creation of maps during the Age of Exploration. Of special interest are maps such as Waldseemüller and Ringmann's first map mentioning "America." The New York Times Science page looks at A Renaissance Globemaker’s Toolbox, a new book on the subject by John W. Hessler.

Albrecht Dürer in Washington

The works of German Renaissance artist Albrecht Dürer are being showed in an exhibit at the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. Holland Cotter, of the New York Times Art and Design section, looks at the artist and his work.

"Vikings" comes to History Channel March 3, 2013

On March 3, 2013, Vikings will sail onto television screens in a "nine-part drama series from Michael Hirst, creator of The Tudors." The series will focus on the exploits of Ragnar Lothbrok and his followers, complete with "dynamic displays of superherolike derring-do and physical stamina."

The re-emergence of Myra

In the 14th century, the city of Myra near Demre, Turkey, disappeared under the silt of the Myros River. Now, 700 years later, the city, once an importance pilgrimage site of the Byzantine Empire, is re-remerging - building by building. (photo)

Own an early Bronzino for a mere US$18 million

On January 30, 2013, Christie’s Auction House will place on sale Agnolo Bronzino’s Portrait of a Young Man With a Book, "a relatively unknown panel depicting a man with a reddish beard in his 20s dressed in black, sitting at a table covered with green cloth." (photo)

The Cloisters: "An intellectual Coney Island"

In the 1930s philanthropist John D. Rockefeller Jr. and American sculptor George Grey Barnard collaborated to create “an intellectual Coney Island” in Upper Manhattan. The result was the Cloisters, a complex comprised by elements from five medieval cloisters. Sarah Harrison Smith has written a lengthy feature article for the New York Times on New York's medieval museum.

Africans in art of the Renaissance

With European exploration and expansion during the Renaissance came renewed ties with Africa. Such ties, as presented in art, are the focus of a new exhibit at the Walters Art Museum in New York City, Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe.

Byzantine jewelry sparkles in New York gallery show

Les Enluminures gallery in New York City will present Byzantium and the West: Jewelry in the First Millennium, its fall 2012 show featuring Byzantine jewelry from the 3rd through 10th centuries. The exhibit will be open November 2 to 30, 2012 with  possible auction taking place in December.

Exhibit honors founder of Metropolitan Museum of Art's armor collection

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is putting on  show  “Bashford Dean and the Creation of the Arms and Armor Department” in honor of the founding curator, Bashford Dean, of their medieval arms and armor collection.

Driving Russia's Golden Ring

Despite the aggrevation of Russia's roads,  a road trip around the country's Golden Ring, "a circuit of about 10 ancient towns northeast of Moscow, each with its own set of glittering onion-domed churches and medieval fortresses," can be rewarding. Freelance writer iand a former Moscow correspondent for The New York Times, Celestine Bohlen, discusses her recent trip.

Modern Europe needs a Holy Roman Empire

In an article for the New York Times, Istvan Deak opines that what the European Union really needs is a unifying force, such as the Holy Roman Empire, led by a modern Charlemagne.

The memorable Elizabethans

In a recent review for the New York Times, James Shapiro looks at The Elizabethans by A. N. Wilson, which chronicles the lives of a number of eminent men and women of late Tudor times "who made the age so memorable, including the most remarkable of them all, Queen Elizabeth."

"Medieval Play" challenges fortitude of the audience

“We have a long way to go before this is over, so don’t get too excited,” says St. Catherine of Siena at the beginning of the second act of Kenneth Lonergan’s Medieval Play at the Signature Center in New York. Ben Brantley of the New York Times has a review.

Luxury home once birthplace of opera

Paolo and Gabriella Mazza of Florence, Italy combined a work project with a new home when they purchased La Camerata, as the 3,444-square-foot (320 square meters) theater, believed to have been designed by Renaissance architect Filippo Brunelleschi. (slideshow)

Indiana Jones of the graveyards

34-year-old Philippe Charlier works with the dead - long dead - and likes it that way. Nicknamed the "Indiana Jones of the Graveyards," Charlier is France's most famous forensic anthropologist, and his patients are the country's historic personages the likes of Henri IV and Charles III.

Romeo and Juliet in Baghdad

The World Shakespeare Festival in Stratford-upon-Avon, England has a unique offering this year, a new take on Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet called Romeo and Juliet in Baghdad where the couple are not divided by family squabbles but by religious sects.

Rappin' to Chaucer with Baba Brinkman

Canadian Baba Brinkman is a performer - and a scholar of medieval literature. He combined both in a recent one-man show, The Canterbury Tales Remixed, which set the Chaucer’s 14th-century work to original hip-hop songs. Catherine Rampell of the New York Times, has a review.

Pocahontas' wedding site discovered

Scholars and preservationists at the historic site of Jamestown, Virginia, believe they have discovered the remains of one of the country's oldest Protestant churches, the site where Pocahontas was baptized and married.

Metropolitan Museum of Art reopens Islamic galleries

For eight years, the vast collections of Islamic art at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art has been unavailable to the public, but now visitors can enjoy the collection as never before. Holland Cotter of the New York Times has a review.

Bridging the centuries at Hammerhaus

Take a 16-room "mini-castle" near Austria. Fill it with interesting and unusual contemporary decor, and you have the Hammerhaus. Photographer Andreas Meichsner of The New York Times has a slideshow.

The royal weddings of Westminster Abbey

Despite popular belief, Westminster Abbey has not been a popular site for British royal weddings. Only fifteen have taken place there since the 12th century.

Washington Haggadah centerpiece of Hebrew manuscripts at the Met

In celebration of Passover, Edward Rothstein of the New York Times discusses the reading of the Haggadah represented by the Washington Haggadah, a manuscript from 1478 on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through June 26, 2011. (slide show)