1301 CE to 1400 CE

14th century caravansary open to the public in Jerusalem

Near the Temple Mount in Jerusalem lies a complex of ancient buildings including Ahar Kotlenu a refurbished 14th century caravansary, an inn for caravans, now open to the public. The site includes a 3,500 square feet (325 square meters) grand hall with cross-vaulted stone roof held aloft by six reinforced pillars.

Samurai armor exhibited at the LACMA

The Samurai Collection of Ann and Gabriel Barbier-Mueller, one of the finest and most comprehensive collections of Samurai armor in the world, will be on display at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in California until February 1, 2015.

What medieval Venice can teach about controlling Ebola

Experts on disease control, working with the Ebola outbreak in Africa, are looking back to medieval Venice to understand how to contain the disease. Dr. Igor Linkov of the US Army Engineer Research and Development Center believes the key is resilience management, "managing physical movement, social interactions, and data collection."

Swansea remembers its medieval past

Officials in Swansea, Wales are trying to bring the city's medieval past to life for citizens and visitors by installing street markers pinpointing major sites in the town. Cemlyn Davies, of the BBC, reports. (video)

Medieval site with a royal connection

Archaeologists in York, England will have the rare opportunity to investigate a site which has lain undisturbed for nearly 500 years. The Hidden Guildhall investigation will focus on riverside property once the site of the medieval friary visited by the Duke of Gloucester, later Richard III.

Plague burial discovered in Barcelona

Spain in the 14th century was one of the countries hardest hit by the Black Plague, yet no burial of plague victims had been discovered, until now. Recently archaeologists working on the Basilica of Sant Just i Pastor in Barcelona unearthed a burial of 120 bodies "packed like sardines" under the sacristy.

The face of medieval Edinburgh

In 2009, archaeologists discovered the burial site of 400 14th century citizens of the Leith area of Edinburgh, Scotland. 30 skeletons were chosen for intense study, and now forensic artists have put faces to a few of the remains. (photo)

Medieval shipwreck found off Cornish coast

The remains of a ship, dating to 1305, have been found near the Isles of Scilly, along the coast of Cornwall. The shipwreck is believed to be the oldest documented ship lost in the area's dangerous, rocky coast.

Leiston Abbey dig reveals gaming piece and curse tablet

Leiston Abbey in the 14th century must have been an interesting place, considering some artifacts found by volunteers during a two-week archaeological excavation in the summer of 2014, including a Nuremburg jetton "poker chip" and a metal tablet expected to contain a curse. (photos)

Long lost Salisbury Hall discovered beneath former stadium car park

In 1322, the Salisbury Manor was built in Walthamstow, a suburb of London. The manor burned in the 16th century and was replaced by a Tudor structure, but was also lost. Now a team of archaeologists from Archaeology South East have found Salisbury Manor  beneath a former car park for Walthamstow Stadium.

Medieval Italian died of brucellosis, say scientists

DNA testing has revealed that a man, whose skeleton was found in the ruins of a Medieval Italian village, died of an infection called brucellosis usually acquired by ingesting unpasteurized dairy products. The report, by Warwick Medical School's Professor Mark Pallen and his colleagues, was published in mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

"Tally-ho" seal brings smiles in Lufton

Lufton, England has been the site of settlement from the Iron Age to the present, but archaeologists working on the Roman era of the town were amused to discover a wax seal from the Middle Ages, decorated with a light-hearted hunting scene. (photo)

TED Talk: The Black Death

In a TED Talk video, Sharon N. DeWitte looks at the bubonic plague, which devastated Europe in the 14th century.

Aberdeenshire barn could give "vital clues about medieval farm living"

Excavators from Scottish Hydro Electric (SHE) Transmission are accustomed to finding historic artifacts during their work. In fact, their team includes an archaeologist. Now a recent discovery of a 14th or 15th century barn has given her something exciting to study.

Re-enactors gather for Bannockburn anniversary

The battle of Bannockburn took place 700 years ago near Stirling, Scotland. Now the legendary battle has been commemorated by more than 250 re-enactors from around the world. (photos)

Was the Black Prince really so evil?

British school children all know about the evil Black Prince Edward of Woodstock, who put to death 3,000 innocents after the siege of the French town of Limoges in September 1370. But the discovery of a letter written by Edward may change his image forever.

Exeter's unique medieval water system

Water in the City: The Aqueducts and Underground Passages of Exeter by Mark Stoyle, a new book published by the University of Exeter Press, looks at the complex water supply system, dating to the 14th century, that once served the medieval city and now still exists beneath its streets.

Sackler Gallery presents Persian Calligraphy exhibit

The Sackler Gallery in Washington D.C. will present Nasta'liq: The Genius of Persian Calligraphy beginning September 13, 2014. The exhibit will showcase Persian calligraphy from the 14th-16th centuries.

Newcastle renovation reveals medieval secrets

The development of a new commercial district in Newcastle, England has sparked interest in the medieval quayside life of the city, an area reclaimed from the River Tyne by the year 1400. Excavations have already uncovered a substantial sandstone wall and green-glazed pottery.

Remains of Henry VII of Luxembourg buried with rare silk cloth

Researchers in Italy have the rare opportunity to examine and analyze the remains of Henry VII of Luxembourg, German king and Holy Roman emperor, who died in 1313 and is buried in Pisa Cathedral. The remains were exhuned in 2013 to determine the emperor’s physical features and cause of death. (photos)

Oldest copy of "The Brus" restored

The oldest known copy of "The Brus," an epic poem describing the Battle of Bannockburn, has been restored in time for the 700th celebration of the event. The poem was written in 1375 by the Archdeacon of Aberdeen. (photos)

Medieval bath found in Shkodër excavations

An archaeological team from the Antiquity of Southeastern Europe Research Centre of the University of Warsaw, Poland has discovered a 14th century bath in northwestern Albania. The structure combines technologies of the Roman and Ottoman Empires.

14th century lead bulla found in Polish castle

Archaeological excavations at Człuchów castle in Poland have unearthed a 14th century lead bulla of Pope Gregory XI, a seal used to authenticate documents. The bulla is believed to have originated during the Teutonic Order's crusade against pagan Lithuania.

Polish university celebrates 650 years of learning

Once known as Kraków Academy, Jagiellonian University is the oldest university in Poland and one of the oldest in Europe. Established in 1364 by King Casimir III, the university has educated such greats as astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus and poet Jan Kochanowski. PAP, Science and Scholarship in Poland, has a feature on the anniversary.

Hengwrt Chaucer online

The earliest known manuscript of Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales, housed at the National Library of Wales in Aberystwyth, has been digitized and is now available online. (photo)

Faith, Hope, or the Great Mortality

Faith, Hope, or the Great Mortality is a historical fiction novel that takes in England and Wales when the Black Death - or the Great Mortality as it was then known - first arrives. The main character, Thomas de Parr, is the youngest son of a nobleman and is destined to become a monk at Tintern Abbey.

Black plague: Survival of the fittest

A new study by University of South Carolina anthropologist Sharon DeWitte shows that those who survived Europe's 14th century Black Plague "lived significantly longer and were healthier than people who lived before the epidemic struck in 1347."

Historical Fiction Novel

Please check out a new historical fiction novel by Thomas F. Schultz titled: Faith, Hope, or the Great Mortality.  The title is available on Amazon and for Kindle.

"Examining 14th century Fashion" research paper online

A recent edition of the Falcon Banner, the news magazine of the Kingdom of Calontir, featured documentation by Duchess Aislinn Morcroft entitled An Age of Change: Examining 14th century Fashion.

"Incredibly significant" bishop's seal declared treasure

Metal detector enthusiast Andy Falconer has found a few artifacts over the years but nothing like the 14th century, silver bishop's seal, called "incredibly significant" by Manx National Heritage, he found recently in a field on the Isle of Man. (photo)