1201 CE to 1300 CE

13th century brooch declared treasure

A 13th century pentambular brooch discovered by a metal detector is Hampshire, England, in February 2008 has been declared treasure by North East Hampshire coroner Andrew Bradley. (photo)

Mystery man claims to have found the real "Stone of Destiny"

For years, controversy has surrounded the Stone of Destiny, a relic on display in Edinburgh Castle, with skeptics insisting that the Stone was a fake. Now a "mystery man" claims to have found the real stone in a seaside cave.

The last of the Cagot people traces her roots

No one seems to remember why the French repressed the Cagot people for nearly one thousand years. Now Marie-Pierre Manet-Beauzac, the last of the bloodline, is attempting to uncover the truth about a persecuted people. Sean Thomas of the Independent has the story.

Extras needed for "Soldiers of Christ"

Clint Buckner from the University of North Carolina School of the Arts in Winston-Salem is looking for a few extras for a short film he is producing. The film will be shot the weekends of November 8-10 and November 15-17, 2008.

Medieval China being lost to modernisation

Historic Chinese buildings, some dating to the 13th century, are being lost to progress as an explosion of construction overcomes Beijing's old neighborhoods. Especially at risk are the classic hutongs, narrow alleyways created by Mongols during the Yuan dynasty.

Carmelite friars graves found in Perth

A team of archaeologists have discovered the over 50 skeletons dating to the 13th century, of Carmelite friars and other later burials. The remains were found at the future site of retail units in Perth Scotland. The experts have also uncovered the site of the friary church.

Magna Carta exhibit to help fund cathedral restoration

The Lincoln Magna Carta, a once forgotten original 1215 version of the document, will be placed on exhibit at the Fraunces Tavern Museum on Pearl Street in New York City for three months as part of a fund-raising effort by England's Lincoln Cathedral.

Textile resource from Burgos Cathedral available online

Bridgette reports that The Report on the Textiles from Burgos Cathedral, Madrid, Spain is now available online in PDF format.

Vietnamese waged fierce battle against Kublai Khan.

Researchers from Flinders University in Adelaide, South Australia are hoping to shed new light on the 13th century battle between ships from the fleet of China’s emperor Kublai Khan and the Vietnamese general Tran Hung Dao, who defended the Bach Dang River near Hanoi.

Was King Arthur French?

King Arthur might have been French. Heresy? Not according to the organizers of "King Arthur: A Legend in the Making," a medievalists' conference at Rennes University. Many of the Arthurian tales are set in Brittany in the north of France.

St. Ivan Rilski's church discovered in Bulgaria

A team of archaeologists led by Nikolay Ovcharov have unearthed a 13th century church in Veliko Tarnovo. The site is believed to have once housed the relics of St. Ivan Rilski.

Trailer for the new "Alexander Nevsky" film online

An extensive trailer from the latest screen version of Alexander Nevsky is available to view on YouTube. The film is in Russian.

Medieval "beguine" movement still alive in Belgium

Life was tough for women in the 13th century, especially those who had lost their husbands and protectors to the Crusades. Experts believe this was the origin of the "beguines — a Roman Catholic laic order that began in the 13th century and branched across northwest Europe."

Heather Whipps' "How the Spice Trade Changed the World"

LiveScience columnist Heather Whipps writes a weekly column on world-changing events. A recent article discusses how the Spice Trade brought East and West together.

St Margaret's church in Leicester, England ransacked by vandals

Police in Leicester, England report that vandals broke into and desecrated a 13th century church in the city's center, overturning lecterns, breaking windows and defecating through a floor panel into the church's medieval foundation.

13th century tower foundations found under Oxford mound

Workers on Oxford Castle's mound were surprised to discover the remains of a 13th century, 10-sided tower which once stood on the mound.

Alfonso X's Book of Games (1283) now available online

Lord Tristan d'Avignon provides an online copy of his teaching document for medieval games, based on Alfonso X's Book of Games from the thirteenth century.

Scientists Think Humans Arrived in New Zealand in 1280 C.E.

Scientists studying rat remains and seeds eaten by the rats believe humans did not colonize New Zealand until 1280 C.E. because they could not have swum the distances from the nearest islands.

Levantia

"Levantia is a site for the social history of the Roman Empire and Near East, roughly between the ninth and thirteenth centuries. It explores this especially by means of practical reconstruction and experimentation. It also includes discussion of the issues of historiographic method and representation in public contexts."

New film chronicles slave life of Genghis Khan

Mongol, a 2008 film directed by Sergei Bodrov, tells the story of the early life of Genghis Khan as a slave in 13th century Russia.

St. Albans: "Beating the Bounds" since 1250!

The English city of St. Albans takes its history seriously and celebrates yearly with the Beating of the Bounds, a procession dating to the mid 13th century which marks the boundaries of the town.

Westminster Abbey's "carpet of stone" revealed

A two-year restoration project has revealed the breathtaking details of a medieval mosaic pavement, depicting the end of the world, in the floor of London's Westminster Abbey. The floor was originally constructed in the 1260s by Henry III>

Scottish Parliament Archive launched

An online archive of the proceedings of the original Scottish Parliament from its first surviving act of 1235 to its dissolution in 1707 has been launched.

Iowa Digital Library celebrates 100,000th item with 13th century manuscript

A 13th century page from the workshop of William de Brailes was digitized and added to the Iowa Digital Library as its 100,000th item.

Tower lions from northwest Africa

Recent study of a pair of lion skulls discovered during excavations of the Tower of London reveals that the lions originated near the Barbary Coast of Northwest Africa. The skulls, which dated from the 13th or 14th centuries, were carbon dated and tested for DNA.

Ceramics trade between Israel and China flourished in Crusader times

New research from the University of Haifa shows that a healthy trade existed between the eastern Mediterranean and China during the 12th and 13th centuries. The trade consisted mainly of ceramics and pottery.

Riding to rescue vital record of English Medieval Knights

A Culture Minister in England has temporarily blocked export of the Dering Roll, the earliest English roll of arms, in order to "provide a last chance to raise the money to keep the roll in the United Kingdom."

700-year-old Magna Carta to be displayed at the National Archives

Starting March 12, 2008, a handwritten copy of the Magna Carta will go on display at the West Rotunda Gallery of the National Archives Building in Washington DC.

Medieval scandals in three new books

Medieval scandals are the hot reads of the day according to London Times reviwer Nicholas Vincent who reviews three new books dealing with powerful men - and women - of the Middle Ages.

"Magna Carta and the World of King John" at Penn State

The Magna Carta will be the focus of this year's Medieval Conference at Pennsylvania State University March 28-29, 2008. The conference will "examine various groups and institutions of that society, in attempt to fill in the background of the Great Charter: the world of King John, and additional sessions will deal with teaching about Magna Carta and its time period.