1201 CE to 1300 CE

The Knights Templar mystery linked to the Shroud of Turin

Two of the great mysteries of the Middle Ages were linked recently when the Vatican announced that the renowned Shroud of Turin was hidden for over 100 years after the Crusades by the Knights Templar. (video)

Earthquake takes lives, damages treasures in central Italy

Tragedy struck central Italy April 7 when a 6.3 magnitude earthquake toppled ancient and modern buildings in the medieval city of L’Aquila. Over 200 people lost their lives, and the earthquake damaged nearly all the historic buildings of the town. (video)

Crusader castle project could prove value of new technologies

Archaeologist Katharina Galor believes technology might just help eliminate hours of tedious recording and cataloging during a dig, and she plans to test her theory at Apollonia-Arsuf, a crusader castle in Israel.

Sherwood "infested" by Robin Hood?

According to a 15th century history book, Robin Hood may not have been as popular with the common people as believed. According to art historian Julian Luxford, Robin and his merry men "infested" Sherwood Forest with their thieving ways.

Vikings were "model immigrants"

A three-day conference at Cambridge University may shake up traditional views of Vikings. The new study will show that, far from marauding barbarians, the Norse were "more cultured settlers who offered a 'good historical model' of immigrant assimilation."

Santa Clara University showcases medieval garden

In honor of its namesake St. Clare of Assisi, Santa Clara University in Santa Clara, California has created a medieval garden dedicated to the saint who was "was often compared to a plant or garden." The university's website includes a great deal of information on medieval gardens.

Persian pottery shard inscribed with Rubaiyat found in Jerusalem

Archaeologists working in the Old City of Jerusalem have discovered a piece of Persian pottery dating to the 12th-13th centuries. The shard is inscribed with a quotation from the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam. (photo)

13th century midden yields shoe soles

A batch of leather shoe soles dating from the 13th to 18th centuries was found in 2005 in a hollow tree trunk in an ancient trash dump in Lyon, France. The soles are well-preserved.

California monks reconstruct 800 year old building

Monks at the Abbey of New Clairvaux in Vina, California are rebuilding an 800 year old chapter house transported from Ovila, Spain to California in 1931 by William Randoph Hearst.

Rare face-mask jug found in Scotland

An archaeological dig at the site of the former Rothesay Council Chambers in Scotland has unearthed a rare 13th century ceramic jug. (photo)

Submerged island and sunken galley may hold clues to Venetian dominance

Italian archaeologists are undertaking a project to raise an entire island which has been submerged in the lagoon of Venice since the 16th century. Among the artifacts they hope to recover is a remarkably preserved 13th century wooden galley.

Light show marks 800th anniversary of Cambridge University

The home to "some of the most significant scientific breakthroughs in history - including the splitting of the atom and the discovery of the structure of DNA," Cambridge University in England celebrates its 800th anniversary with worldwide events and an "exuberant" atmosphere.

Westminster Chapter House to undergo renovation

The Chapter House of Westminster Abbey is crumbling, its stonework decaying and pocked with WWII shrapnel scars, its stone carvings damaged, but there is relief in sight in the form of a £2m restoration program to repair the 13th century octagonal building.

Oldest extant Medieval Roll of Arms bought by British Library

Hrolf Jamesonreports that the British Library has acquired the the Dering Roll, the "oldest extant Medieval Roll of Arms." The document was purchased for UK£194,184.

International banking - medieval-style

A team of researchers from England's Reading University are studying the credit crunch -- not the recent one, but the "medieval credit crunch" from the time of England's King Edward I.

Lost church of Bix Gibwyn found in Oxfordshire

Archaeologists are hoping that they have found the location of the "lost" church of Bix Gibwyn, an 800-year-old structure that was abandoned in the late 16th century. The research team has discovered three medieval graves which could pinpoint the site of the church.

Time Team finds bishop's palace in Ross, England

A medieval mystery has been solved with the discovery by the Time Team of Bishop’s Palace at Ross-on-Wye, England. The location of the famed palace has been lost for over 300 years.

Archaeologists continue to search for Hull's ancient friary

Archaeologists working on an excavation in the town of Hull, Yorkshire, are delighted to have discovered the medieval Humber Gate, but are still looking for the elusive Carmelite friary, built in the town in the late 1290's.

Archimedes Palimpsest Project celebrates 10th anniversary

William Noel, Curator of Manuscripts for the Walters Art Museum, reports that the Archimedes Palimpsest Project has just celebrated its 10th anniversary. The project was established to rediscover lost passages from the 13th century Byzantine prayerbook containing at seven treatises by Archimedes.

Public may help look for tomb of Genghis Khan

800 years after his death, scientists at the University of California San Diego's Center for Interdisciplinary Science in Art, Architecture and Archaeology (CISA3) are using advanced visualization technologies to try to find the long-lost grave of the emperor Genghis Khan.

13th century brooch declared treasure

A 13th century pentambular brooch discovered by a metal detector is Hampshire, England, in February 2008 has been declared treasure by North East Hampshire coroner Andrew Bradley. (photo)

Mystery man claims to have found the real "Stone of Destiny"

For years, controversy has surrounded the Stone of Destiny, a relic on display in Edinburgh Castle, with skeptics insisting that the Stone was a fake. Now a "mystery man" claims to have found the real stone in a seaside cave.

The last of the Cagot people traces her roots

No one seems to remember why the French repressed the Cagot people for nearly one thousand years. Now Marie-Pierre Manet-Beauzac, the last of the bloodline, is attempting to uncover the truth about a persecuted people. Sean Thomas of the Independent has the story.

Extras needed for "Soldiers of Christ"

Clint Buckner from the University of North Carolina School of the Arts in Winston-Salem is looking for a few extras for a short film he is producing. The film will be shot the weekends of November 8-10 and November 15-17, 2008.

Medieval China being lost to modernisation

Historic Chinese buildings, some dating to the 13th century, are being lost to progress as an explosion of construction overcomes Beijing's old neighborhoods. Especially at risk are the classic hutongs, narrow alleyways created by Mongols during the Yuan dynasty.

Carmelite friars graves found in Perth

A team of archaeologists have discovered the over 50 skeletons dating to the 13th century, of Carmelite friars and other later burials. The remains were found at the future site of retail units in Perth Scotland. The experts have also uncovered the site of the friary church.

Magna Carta exhibit to help fund cathedral restoration

The Lincoln Magna Carta, a once forgotten original 1215 version of the document, will be placed on exhibit at the Fraunces Tavern Museum on Pearl Street in New York City for three months as part of a fund-raising effort by England's Lincoln Cathedral.

Textile resource from Burgos Cathedral available online

Bridgette reports that The Report on the Textiles from Burgos Cathedral, Madrid, Spain is now available online in PDF format.

Vietnamese waged fierce battle against Kublai Khan.

Researchers from Flinders University in Adelaide, South Australia are hoping to shed new light on the 13th century battle between ships from the fleet of China’s emperor Kublai Khan and the Vietnamese general Tran Hung Dao, who defended the Bach Dang River near Hanoi.

Was King Arthur French?

King Arthur might have been French. Heresy? Not according to the organizers of "King Arthur: A Legend in the Making," a medievalists' conference at Rennes University. Many of the Arthurian tales are set in Brittany in the north of France.