1201 CE to 1300 CE

Have you read the Magna Carta?

Have you read the Magna Carta? Most people haven't, but now, according to Britton Morgan of Atlantia, a translation is available online at the National Archives website.

13th century heraldic badge found in Coventry

A copper badge bearing three heraldic lions has been found in a stone wall in Coventry, England. The badge probably came from a horse harness.

Birch bark manuscripts found in Novgarod

A school girl taking part in a dig in Novgorod, Russia has discovered two birch bark manuscripts and a medieval seal.

New Sanai verses discovered

An Iranian scholar has discovered 205 previously unknown quatrains of the 12th century Sufi poet Sanai Ghaznavi.

Murals and icons from St. Nikita's Monastery online

Professor Michael J. Fuller has created a website featuring murals and iconography from Saint Nikita's Monastery, an 11th century Macedonian church rebuilt in the 13th century by the Serbian King Milutin.

13th century coin hoard found in Macedonia

Archeologists have unearthed a jug full of coins at Skopje Fortress, a Byzantine-era fortress also known as The Kale.

"Egyptian blue" pigment found in medieval altar

Reserachers from the University of Barcelona have discovered evidence of Egyptian Blue pigment on the altarpiece of the 12th century church of Sant Pere de Terrassa.

Website traces European effigies

The Effigies and Brasses website offers links and images for numerous European effigies, brasses, incised slabs, half-reliefs, and other miscellaneous representations dating from the 12th-15th centuries.

13th century Bible on eBay

For a mere US$185,000, you too can own your own 13th century manuscript, in this case 652 page vellum manuscript, illuminated throughout. (photos)

Magna Carta to stay longer in New York

New Yorkers and visitors to the city will have an unusual opportunity to see the Magna Carta throughout May at the Morgan Library & Museum in Manhattan.

Robin Hood: the Man, the Myth, the Movies

In a wide-ranging feature article, Stephen Moss discusses the development of the Robin Hood legend, its possible historical bases, and the new film starring Russell Crowe.

Robin Hood: "creature of the media"

In October of 2009, Robin Hood fans and foes gathered for the International Association for Robin Hood Studies, a three-day conference at the University of Rochester in New York. The conference "featured a series of events that highlighted Robin Hood’s status as a creature of the media."

14th century remains give "fascinating insight" into Fenwick history

The discovery of a grave dating to the 13th or 14th century may provide a link to a medieval settlement that existed at West Fenwick, England.

Italian village hosts annual 13th century reenactment

A small town in central Italy stages an annual festival, lasting ten days, in which residents divide into four neighborhoods and compete to see who can best reenact life in that town in the 13th century. (video)

Erwin Tomash Library offers insight into history of computing, geometry, and mathematics

A casual interest in the history of computing led Erwin Tomash, who started his career in computer engineering in the 1940s and became one of the pioneers of the information age, to compile an encyclopedic, illustrated catalog of primary source references dating back to the 12th century CE. The catalog is available online for free access.

Medieval fortress rising in Ozark hills

Amateur archaeologist and inventor Michel Guyot, the master-mind behind the renovation of Château of Saint Fargeau in France, is constructing a medieval fortress in Lead Hill, Arkansas. The project's web site has updated photos.

Evidence of pre-Islamic society found in Ghana

Archaeologists working on a site near the village of Yikpabongo in the western African country of Ghana have discovered dozens of clay figures depicting people and animals dating from the 7th to 13th centuries. They believe the artifacts are evidence of a pre-Islamic society.

Leicestershire artifacts help tell story of pilgrims' lives

Lead flasks, discovered by metal detectorists, are helping historians understand the history of medieval pilgrims in Leicestershire, England dating from the early 13th century through to the 16th century.

13th century cross may have served as Christian advertisement

A 13th century stone cross, once thought to be a gatepost in Dartmoor, England, may have served as a signpost for parishoners to attend church, according to Win Scutt of City College Plymouth. The cross was constructed from a two-meter long block of granite.

Cross slabs discovered after church fire

The recent devastating fire at St. Brandon's Church in Brancepeth, near Durham City, England was a tragedy, but one with "a silver lining." what the fire revealed were 20 medieval tombstones dating to the 12th and 13th centuries. (video)

Remains of Pere el Gran found in Tarragona, Spain

A team of archaeologists at the Santa Maria de Santes Creus monastery in Tarragona, Spain have used non-intrusive methods to investigate the tomb of Pere el Gran (1240-1285), one of the country's most important rulers. (video)

Search for tomb of Genghis Khan continues

Traditionally, the grave of Mongol leader Genghis Khan, who died in 1227, was kept secret to keep enemies from desecrating it, and for years archaeologists have sought to find it. Now a new expedition hopes to discover a veritable "Mongolian Valley of the Kings."

New theories abound on Lewis Chessmen

David Caldwell of the National Museum of Scotland does not believe the recognized theory that the famous Chessmen of Lewis belonged to a merchant passing through Scotland. Caldwell thinks the owner was a noble who lived in the area, and that the pieces may not have been "chessmen" at all.

Astrolabe: "world's first popular computer"

Author and software designer Tom Wujec takes a step back in time to discuss the medieval astrolabe. The video and transcript of the discussion is available on the TED website.

Crusader-era marble hoard found in Akko

A hoard of over 350 pieces of rare, antique marble has been discovered beneath a cellar floor in the Israeli coastal city of Akko. The hoard dates to the 13th century, and is believed to have been collected from nearby destroyed buildings.

Buy Ewloe Castle for as little as UK£80,000?

Ewloe Castle, a Welsh structure built in the 13th century by Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, is scheduled to be auctioned December 8, 2009. Starting bid? UK£80,000. (photo)

Medieval pine trees found in Norway

Norwegian scientists were surprised recently to find that dendrochronological dating showed fallen pine trees they were studying as part of climate research had died in the 14th century. Resin secreted by the dying trees is responsible for the "mummification."

Controversial Wallace statue returned to creator

For more than ten years, a 13-foot, sandstone statue of William Wallace held a place of honor at the Wallace Monument in Stirling, Scotland, but last year it was returned to sculptor Tom Church "to make way for a new visitor centre." (photo)

Organic chemist claims to have reproduced the Shroud of Turin

An Italian scientist claims to have reproduced the image on the Shroud of Turin using only materials and techniques known in the Middle Ages. Luigi Garlaschelli, who will present his findings at a conference, said, "The result obtained clearly indicates that this could be done with the use of inexpensive materials and with a quite simple procedure."

13th century Perth Charter restored

The year-long project to restore the Royal Charter of the city of Perth, Scotland has been completed. The status of Royal Burgh was given to Perth in 1210 by King William the Lion of Scotland. (photo)