1201 CE to 1300 CE

The re-emergence of Myra

In the 14th century, the city of Myra near Demre, Turkey, disappeared under the silt of the Myros River. Now, 700 years later, the city, once an importance pilgrimage site of the Byzantine Empire, is re-remerging - building by building. (photo)

The last Viking battle: "A war just waiting to happen"

In the 13th century, Scotland was divided between the Scots on the mainland and the Vikings of the western islands. The struggle that followed brought an end to Viking rule in the country. A  new BBC Two program looks at The Last Battle of the Vikings.

Norfolk metal detectorist finds declared treasure

Several objects dating to the Middle Ages have been declared treasure by the Norfolk Historic Environment Services, including a 6th century brooch, an Anglo-Saxon sword belt mount, and a copper alloy jetton converted to a brooch. (photos)

New Year magic in the Middle Ages

In the Middle Ages, the period after Christmas was a time for looking ahead to the new year. Practices included superstitions and methods to predict weather for the coming year. The clergy accepted some of the age-old rituals, but were loathe to allow others. A recent article for Phys.org looks at Christmas Day fortune telling.

Norse myth courtesy of Snorri Sturluson

Much of the Norse mythology we recognize today comes courtesy of the writing of 13th century Icelandic chieftain Snorri Sturluson. Nancy Marie Brown takes a look at Snorri on her blog God of Wednesday.

Dramatic light fills Norwich Cloister

A UK£200,000 donation has made possible new lighting of the 13th century cloister at Norwich Cathedral. "This is a scheme we've been working on for some years and with the help of a generous personal legacy we've at last been able to achieve it," said the Very Reverend Graham Smith, Dean of Norwich. (photo)

Robin Hood Land?

The city council of Nottingham, England and a private concern are at odds over plans to construct two major attractions honoring Robin Hood in Nottinghamshire. The city hopes to revamp the Nottingham Castle, while Discovery Attractions wants to build a UK£13m theme park near Edwinstowe. (graphic)

Leicester burials continue to mystify

The mysteries surrounding remains found under a Leicester, England car park continue with efforts to identify the bones of a woman found in the vicinity of those suspected to belong to King Richard III. Experts are puzzled at the burial of a woman in Greyfriars church, a male institution.

Bali's "biggest ancient Hindu temple" found

Construction workers in Denpasar, Bali have discovered the remains of a stone temple at a Hindu study center believed to be the largest Hindu temple ever found on the island. Archaeologists have identified the foundations of the 20-metre-long east wing of the structure.

Kublai Khan and the Mongol invasion of China

China had been an empire for over 1,000 year when the Mongol heir to Genghis, Kublai Khan, roared into the southern part of the country in the 13th century. Carrie Gracie of the BBC has a feature story.

13th century silver brooch declared treasure

In 2011, metal detectorist Frank Kurzeja discovered a silver brooch 10 inches beneath the soil near Cowfold, England. The brooch has recently been declared treasure. (photo)

African king is history's richest man

Bill Gates who? CelebrityNetWorth has named Mansa Musa I, the 14th century leader of the Empire of Mali, the richest man of all time, with a personal worth of over US$400 billion.  Mali's role as supplier of salt and gold to much of the known world made the king rich and Mali an economic superpower.

The ongoing importance of the Magna Carta

In Great Britain and the United States, the Magna Carta is revered as one of the bases of law. In an article for History Today, Ralph V. Turner, Professor of History Emeritus, Florida State University, and the author of Magna Carta, looks at the document and its importance through history.

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Dwynwen's church to be restored

Santes Dwynwen, daughter of Welsh King Brychan Brycheiniog, who died in the 5th century, is considered the patron saint of Welsh lovers. Now a ruined church at Llanddwyn on Anglesey has been scheduled for restoration.

Discovered village offers "a glimpse of rural 13th Century life"

Archaeologists have begun work on a site near Bromyard, England where they believe they will find the remains of a medieval village. "It may be part of a village called Studmarsh, on land known as the Grove."

Crusader coins found in Apollonia castle

A joint team of archaeologists from Tel Aviv University and Israel’s Nature and Parks Authority have discovered "one of the largest gold coin hoards discovered in a medieval site in the land of Israel." The coins were determined to have circulated in the 13th century, the time Crusader occupation.

Rare evidence of medieval trepanation found in Spain

Trepanation, the practice of drilling holes into the skulls of living beings for medical or religious purposes, was rarely performed in the Middle Ages, but the discovery of two skulls in Spain, dating to the 13th or 14th centuries, has made experts scramble for an answer.

Community unites to rebuild 13th century clocktower

In May 2012, disaster struck the small Italian town of Finale Emilia in the form of two powerful earthquakes which destroyed the town's 13th-century clock tower. Now teams of volunteers from across Italy are coming together to help reconstruct the historic Torre dei Modenesi. (photos)

"Oldest" Jewish toilet found in Cologne, Germany

“This is the window through which feces are going to get out” reads the Hebrew inscription on what experts believe may be the oldest Jewish toilet ever found. The inscription was discovered on a stone lintel of a 13th century house near the city's medieval synagogue.

Marketing Robin Hood

"In the past, attempts to promote Robin Hood have been regarded as flimsy and lightweight and it needs something to really hold the public's imagination," said Ted Cantle who would like to see his home town of Nottingham, England do more to promote the famous outlaw.

"Immense volcanic eruption" may have led to death of thousands in medieval England

Archaeologists for the Museum of London recently discovered 175 mass graves dating to around 1250, 100 years before the Black Plague. What killed over 10,000 people in England may have been an immense volcanic eruption.

Website created for medieval English inquisitions post mortem

The website Mapping the Medieval Countryside: Places, People, and Properties in the Inquisitions Post Mortem has been created to provide online access to records of the "recorded lands held at their deaths by tenants of the crown."

Taking the feudal oath online

As part of their Internet Medieval Sourcebook, Fordham University offers a section on medieval feudal oaths as part of a legal discussion of feudalism. Sources were created during the Middle Ages.

Hoard of gold coins found in crusader castle

"This is the first hoard of gold coins that we have in Israel that we can date to the Crusader period," said Oren Tal, director of the excavation of the 13th century Crusader castle of Arsur, where a hoard of 108 gold coins was recently discovered.

13th century Aberdeen Bestiary on display

The Aberdeen Bestiary, a 13th century illustrated book of animals, will be on display at Aberdeen University for the first time. The book, which once belonged Henry VIII, has been in the care of the university for nearly four centuries. (photos)

Artifacts discovered in 13th century Bulgarian monastery

A team of archaeologists has found a number of structures and artifacts, dating to the 13th century, from an excavation of the St. Peter and St. Paul Monastery at Veliko Tarnovo, the capital of the Second Bulgarian Empire.

British remember "lost" Jewish cemetery

In 1231, the Jews of Oxford, England were given a small piece of land for a cemetery. The site was used until 1290 when Edward I expelled all the Jews from the country. Now a memorial stone has been placed to mark the "lost" burial ground.

Archaeologists hunt for site of Battle of Lewes

In 1264, England's King Henry III refused to honor an agreement given to his barons, thus initiating the Battle of Lewes and prompting the creation of Parliament. Now an archaeological dig is underway to locate the site of the historic battle.

Public invited to view ancient remains in Wakefield

Officials at Wakefield Cathedral in England have invited visitors to pay respects to recently unearthed remains, dating to the Middle Ages, discovered during renovations to the church. The remains are scheduled to be reburied.