1201 CE to 1300 CE

Alfonso X's Book of Games (1283) now available online

Lord Tristan d'Avignon provides an online copy of his teaching document for medieval games, based on Alfonso X's Book of Games from the thirteenth century.

Scientists Think Humans Arrived in New Zealand in 1280 C.E.

Scientists studying rat remains and seeds eaten by the rats believe humans did not colonize New Zealand until 1280 C.E. because they could not have swum the distances from the nearest islands.

Levantia

"Levantia is a site for the social history of the Roman Empire and Near East, roughly between the ninth and thirteenth centuries. It explores this especially by means of practical reconstruction and experimentation. It also includes discussion of the issues of historiographic method and representation in public contexts."

New film chronicles slave life of Genghis Khan

Mongol, a 2008 film directed by Sergei Bodrov, tells the story of the early life of Genghis Khan as a slave in 13th century Russia.

St. Albans: "Beating the Bounds" since 1250!

The English city of St. Albans takes its history seriously and celebrates yearly with the Beating of the Bounds, a procession dating to the mid 13th century which marks the boundaries of the town.

Westminster Abbey's "carpet of stone" revealed

A two-year restoration project has revealed the breathtaking details of a medieval mosaic pavement, depicting the end of the world, in the floor of London's Westminster Abbey. The floor was originally constructed in the 1260s by Henry III>

Scottish Parliament Archive launched

An online archive of the proceedings of the original Scottish Parliament from its first surviving act of 1235 to its dissolution in 1707 has been launched.

Iowa Digital Library celebrates 100,000th item with 13th century manuscript

A 13th century page from the workshop of William de Brailes was digitized and added to the Iowa Digital Library as its 100,000th item.

Tower lions from northwest Africa

Recent study of a pair of lion skulls discovered during excavations of the Tower of London reveals that the lions originated near the Barbary Coast of Northwest Africa. The skulls, which dated from the 13th or 14th centuries, were carbon dated and tested for DNA.

Ceramics trade between Israel and China flourished in Crusader times

New research from the University of Haifa shows that a healthy trade existed between the eastern Mediterranean and China during the 12th and 13th centuries. The trade consisted mainly of ceramics and pottery.

Riding to rescue vital record of English Medieval Knights

A Culture Minister in England has temporarily blocked export of the Dering Roll, the earliest English roll of arms, in order to "provide a last chance to raise the money to keep the roll in the United Kingdom."

700-year-old Magna Carta to be displayed at the National Archives

Starting March 12, 2008, a handwritten copy of the Magna Carta will go on display at the West Rotunda Gallery of the National Archives Building in Washington DC.

Medieval scandals in three new books

Medieval scandals are the hot reads of the day according to London Times reviwer Nicholas Vincent who reviews three new books dealing with powerful men - and women - of the Middle Ages.

"Magna Carta and the World of King John" at Penn State

The Magna Carta will be the focus of this year's Medieval Conference at Pennsylvania State University March 28-29, 2008. The conference will "examine various groups and institutions of that society, in attempt to fill in the background of the Great Charter: the world of King John, and additional sessions will deal with teaching about Magna Carta and its time period.

Princeton acquires Sarmas Collection

Princeton University Library's Department of Rare Books and Special Collections has acquired the Sarmas Collection of coins from 13th-14th century Greece. The 800-coin collection will "help researchers deepen their knowledge about a period of Middle Age history that has been little understood by scholars."

Oxford study: England's Later Medieval Queens

A course being taught at Oxford University, through the Berkeley Extension program, covers the history and role of England's later medieval queens from Eleanor of Aquitaine to Elizabeth Woodville.

Campaign to save cave from damage

The Royston Cave, a man-made cave that dates to the 13th century, is under threat from truck traffic on the road above the cave.

Medieval Mappa honoured by UNESCO

A famous 13th century map of the world has been included in the UNESCO Memory of the World International Register.

Magna Carta sale brings more than US$21.3 million

An early copy of the Magna Carta, sold recently at auction, has brought over US$21 million. The documents was purchased by David Rubinstein, a founder of the Carlyle Group.

Six medieval bishops identified in Scotland

Radiocarbon dating was used recently to help identify the remains of six bishops found buried in at Whithorn Priory in Galloway, Scotland. The skulls dated from between 1200-1360 CE. (photos)

“Good Masters! Sweet Ladies!” called "giggle-worthy"

"I itch in the cathedral; When I pray upon my knees: God, You saved us from damnation; Now save us from the fleas!" writes Laura Amy Schlitz in Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! Voices From a Medieval Village, a new children's book reviewed by John Schwartz for the Sunday New York Times.

Archaeologists search for abbott's grave at Hulton Abbey

A team of archaeologists from Keele University are using the latest geophysical equipment to search the grounds of Hulton Abbey in England hoping to find the graves of the monks who lived there as far back as the 13th century.

Great Hall of the Old Deanery for sale in England

A 13th century medieval hall, located in the Salisbury Cathedral Close in England is up for sale. Originally built as a residence for 60 deans, the building was completely restored in 1963 and has been available as a venue for rent.

The Real Sherwood Forest in Danger

England's Sherwood Forest, famed in the tales of Robin Hood, has dwindled in size from 100,000 acres to a core of just 450 acres and some smaller scattered patches, leaving experts fearful for the future of its ancient oak trees.

Quran from 1203 Sells at Christie's

A Quran, believed to be the oldest complete copy, circa 1203 C.E., was offered for sale through the Hispanic Society of America and sold to traders in London.

Archaeologists find Viking Norwich

Archaeologists working in Norwich, England have discovered city walls dating back to Viking times. “Our finding gives us the old geography of the city and lets us look at the history of the defensive mechanisms used in Norwich at the time," said Andy Hutcheson, archaeology manager for NAU Archaeology.

Freer Gallery of Art celebrates Rumi anniversary

The Freer Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. will celebrate the 800th anniversary of the birth of Sufi poet Mevlana Jalal-ad-Din Rumi with a special presentation on October 27, 2007: Poetry in Song: Rumi's Mystical Journey.

Marco Polo's Zipangu really the Philippines?

A new study by author Setsuko Matoba proposes the theory that the island of Zipangu made famous in The Travels of Marco Polo may not have been Japan, as believed, but the Philippines.

13th century Persian poet still inspires

The poetic and the spiritual alike are celebrating the 800th anniversary of the birth of Sufi poet Rumi who "still inspires with his works evoking ecstasy and the divine." Poet Robert Bly reads from his translation of Rumi's works for NPR's Morning Edition.

Magna Carta to be auctioned

A rare copy of the Magna Carta could bring as much as US$30 million when it is auctioned in New York by Sotheby's in December 2007. The 1297 copy is one of only 20 reissued by King Edward I.