1201 CE to 1300 CE

Leicester site reveals double coffin

The now famous car park in Leicester, England has revealed another interesting find - a stone coffin containing another lead coffin. This is the same site where Richard III's remains were found in 2012.

The history of the humble hot dog

Baseball and picnic season lead many to think of the great summer food: the hot dog. On 2013 US Independence Day, The Week reporter Carmel Lobello took a look at the history of the humble dog, which will be consumed by the billions this summer alone.

Medieval house found near Conwy Castle in Wales

Workers from Dwr Cymru Welsh Water, digging a trench,  were surprised to find the remains of a medieval house and cesspit beneath Castle Street near Conwy Castle in Wales. The "incredibly important" find could "provide a new insight into medieval Conwy."

BBC series on German art begins with Cologne Cathedral

In the first of a series of videos on German art, British art historian and broadcaster Andrew Graham-Dixon looks at German art of the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

Metal detector loot returned to Irish museum

The discovery of historic artifacts using a metal detector has begun a popular pastime in Britain and Ireland, but some enthusiasts are using their equipment to discover and keep, or sell, their objects without permission. One such hobbyist died last year leaving nearly 1000 artifacts to be returned to their rightful owner, the National Museum of Ireland. (photos)

Spooky Rait Castle still mystifies

Rait Castle, on an island in a loch near Naim, Scotland, is haunted, or so say some of its admirers, by the ghost of a handless girl, killed by her father for loving a son of the enemy.

Old Duchy Palace restoration completed

Thanks to the Cornwall Buildings Preservation Trust and The Prince's Regeneration Trust's UK£1m grant, Cornwall's Old Duchy Palace in Lostwithiel has been restored and will contain a permanent heritage exhibition about the palace and its restoration in its basement. (photos)

The mystery of the Lewes skeleton closer to a solution?

Experts are hoping to puzzle out the mystery of a skeleton found buried in a cemetery in the middle of the Lewes battlefield, the site of the historic 1264 Battle of Lewes, which "resulted in the king's defeat and the summoning of England's first representative parliament - as an 'early struggle for democracy.'" All other battle casualties were "slung into a pit.”

Detailed map created of underwater town in England

Archaeologists have created a detailed map of the medieval port city of Dunwich, dubbed "Britain's Atlantis" because it sank into the sea centuries ago.  Using both high-tech imaging and historic research, archaeologists have been able to map out the town boundaries, streets, and even identify individual buildings.

Flanders monks cultivated wetlands to ease overpopulation

Evidence from an archaeological excavation at Boudelo Abbey, once part of the medieval county of Flanders, Belgium, shows that the monks who lived there went to great lengths to cultivate the area's wetlands, building structures on artificially raised soil and providing new lands for occupation.

"Execution site archaeology" subject of German studies

Marita Genesis of Potsdam, Germany has an interesting area of study: execution site archaeology. Genesis is just one of a number of scientists and scholars interested in finding out how those executed died and how executioners, particularly in the Middle Ages, lived. Matthias Schulz of Der Spiegel has the story.

Knight's grave may be part of family crypt

Seven skeletons have been unearthed under a car park in Edinburgh, Scotland, where a knight's grave has previously been found. The skeletons include women and children, leading archaeologists to conclude that it may be a family burial crypt.

Experts debate age of York sapphire ring

A group of experts convened recently at the Yorkshire Museum to debate the age of the beautiful Escrick Ring, found in a field near York, England. The ring was believed to date from the 12th through 16th centuries, but some now think as early as the 5th century. (photo)

"State-of-the-art" medieval medicine showcased in mummified head

For centuries, medical historians have believed that advancements in medicine were stalled between the days of Galen and the Renaissance. Now radiocarbon dating of a mummified, dissected head to the 13th century, shows that medieval doctors may have been more sophisticated than previsouly believed. (photo)

Robin Hood really William of Kensham?

William of Kensham was a resistance fighter in Kent, England who fought the French forces of Prince Louis in 1216, and he might, according to historian Sean McGlynn, be the basis for the Robin Hood myth.

Medieval Murder Scene in Jeopardy

Depicting the murder of Thomas Becket, this medieval wall painting is on the verge of disappearing.

Lewis Chessmen honored with stamps

In gratitude for the loan of the Lewis Chessmen for the Manx National Heritage's Forgotten Kingdom exhibition, MNH director Edmond Southworth presented the British Museum's Naomi Speakman with a set of stamps featuring the medieval chess set. The stamps were issued to the public on January 11, 2013. (photos)

Medieval wall collapse damages car

The owner of an automobile in Ludlow, Shropshire, England has an unusual claim after 33 ft (10m) of the town's medieval wall collapsed, showering the car with debris. "Luckily no-one was injured when the wall collapsed," said Rosanna Taylor-Smith, councillor for Ludlow North.

More than 200,000 manuscripts saved from destruction in Timbuktu

World scholars are breathing a sigh of relief as news reached them that more than 80 percent of the precious manuscripts from Timbuktu were smuggled to safety. Many were driven by car and truck to the Malian capital of Bamako.

New subway station construction shakes Cologne Cathedral

Wide cracks with water seepage have appeared in the walls and ceiling of the 13th century Cologne Cathedral in Germany, damage many feel has been casued by vibrations from a new subway station being constructed next to the cathedral.

Ancient bones can reveal hair and eye color

Dr Wojciech Branicki, from the Institute of Forensic Research and Jagielonian University, Kraków and Prof Manfred Kayser, from the Erasmus University Rotterdam have spent the past few years developing a process to determine the hair and eye color of human remains up to 800 years old.

Hope for the ancient manuscripts of Timbuktu

Last week news outlets reported that militant Islamic rebels fleeing Timbuktu in Mali had torched a new library, destroying many of the city's famed ancient books. Preservationists and the Mali government are now reporting that many of the manuscripts were hidden in a safe house before the attack.

The re-emergence of Myra

In the 14th century, the city of Myra near Demre, Turkey, disappeared under the silt of the Myros River. Now, 700 years later, the city, once an importance pilgrimage site of the Byzantine Empire, is re-remerging - building by building. (photo)

The last Viking battle: "A war just waiting to happen"

In the 13th century, Scotland was divided between the Scots on the mainland and the Vikings of the western islands. The struggle that followed brought an end to Viking rule in the country. A  new BBC Two program looks at The Last Battle of the Vikings.

Norfolk metal detectorist finds declared treasure

Several objects dating to the Middle Ages have been declared treasure by the Norfolk Historic Environment Services, including a 6th century brooch, an Anglo-Saxon sword belt mount, and a copper alloy jetton converted to a brooch. (photos)

New Year magic in the Middle Ages

In the Middle Ages, the period after Christmas was a time for looking ahead to the new year. Practices included superstitions and methods to predict weather for the coming year. The clergy accepted some of the age-old rituals, but were loathe to allow others. A recent article for Phys.org looks at Christmas Day fortune telling.

Norse myth courtesy of Snorri Sturluson

Much of the Norse mythology we recognize today comes courtesy of the writing of 13th century Icelandic chieftain Snorri Sturluson. Nancy Marie Brown takes a look at Snorri on her blog God of Wednesday.

Dramatic light fills Norwich Cloister

A UK£200,000 donation has made possible new lighting of the 13th century cloister at Norwich Cathedral. "This is a scheme we've been working on for some years and with the help of a generous personal legacy we've at last been able to achieve it," said the Very Reverend Graham Smith, Dean of Norwich. (photo)

Robin Hood Land?

The city council of Nottingham, England and a private concern are at odds over plans to construct two major attractions honoring Robin Hood in Nottinghamshire. The city hopes to revamp the Nottingham Castle, while Discovery Attractions wants to build a UK£13m theme park near Edwinstowe. (graphic)

Leicester burials continue to mystify

The mysteries surrounding remains found under a Leicester, England car park continue with efforts to identify the bones of a woman found in the vicinity of those suspected to belong to King Richard III. Experts are puzzled at the burial of a woman in Greyfriars church, a male institution.