Geography

Historic Maps Stolen from British Library

Three 16th and 17th century maps have recently been stolen from bound volumes in the British Library. The theft is just the latest in a rash of crimes targeting libraries and museums.

Italian Programmer "Googles" Roman Villa

History met science recently when an Italian computer programmer discovered what he believes is the ruins of a Roman villa by studying a map found on "Google Earth."

15th Century Ottoman Maps Put to Modern Use

Several countries in the Middle East have recently requested copies of 15th century Ottoman maps to help determine modern border disputes.

Ancient Britain Remapped

Ordnance Survey of Southampton, England, is set to release a new historical map of ancient Britain, complete with place names, roads and landmarks.

Genographic Project to Map Humankind

In what may well be one of the most ambitious scientific projects ever, the National Geographic Society has teamed with IBM to use DNA to map the spread of humanity across the globe.

Blogger Suggests that Marco Polo did not Reach China

In his blog, teacher and Asianist Jonathan Dresner discusses the myth of Marco Polo, whether or not he really made it to China, and where to go to get the facts.

Medieval Cartography Conference to be Held in Vancouver

The Committee for Medieval Studies of the University of British Columbia invites paper proposals for their upcoming conference Cartography in Antiquity and the Middle Ages: Fresh Perspectives, New Methods.

Historic Cities

This Israeli web site has high-resolution scans of many historical maps of cities throughout the world. Many are late-period (1500s and beyond), but some are earlier than that.

"Chaucer's Treatise on Using an Astrolabe" Sparks Interest in Navigational Instruments

In 1391, Geoffrey Chaucer wrote a treatise on how to use an astrolabe. A transcription of the work is now available online, which sparked a discussion of navigational instruments on the Lochac list.