General Science

General medieval sciences, including astronomy, alchemy, metrology, geology, natural philosophy, and similar studies.

Fire in the Sky: History of Fireworks

From a secure bunker at an undisclosed location in the Pocono Mountains, Dame Aoife sends forth links about the history of the "artillery" whose echoing thunder now resounds through her abode.

Which Solstice for Stonehenge?

While Stonehenge is a popular attraction for those wishing to celebrate the Summer Solstice, the monument may actually have been constructed to celebrate the Winter holiday.

French Magazine Claims Turin Shroud a Fake

In its July 2005 issue, Science et Vie explains how an artist used medieval techiques to recreate the image on the cloth.

Museum of Unworkable Devices

Fascinated by machines that almost - but don't quite - work? Here's a website dedicated to fascinating devices that would have been grand, if only they had really worked.

Particle Accelerator used to reveal Archimedes' words on Palimpsest

The only known copy of Archimedes work known as the treatise "Method of Mechanical Theorems" may soon be visible again.

New Scientific Methods to Preserve Gutenberg Bibles

Dutch scientists have discovered new, non-invasive techniques to identify the composition of the inks and pigments used in Gutenberg Bibles in order to better preserve the books.

Genographic Project to Map Humankind

In what may well be one of the most ambitious scientific projects ever, the National Geographic Society has teamed with IBM to use DNA to map the spread of humanity across the globe.

Did Dante Discover Law of Motion Before Galileo?

In an article for Nature, Leonardo Ricci, of the University of Trento, writes that poet Dante Alighieri described the law of motion in physics 300 years before Galileo.

Convention Welcomes Time Travelers

On May 7, 2005, the East Campus Courtyard of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology will be the scene of the first — and only — Time Traveler Convention. All time travelers are encouraged to make their appearances between 8:00 and 10:00 pm on that day.

"Seed Savers Exchange" Vows to Preserve Heirloom Plants

An article in the Lawrence Journal-World looks at Kent Whealy and the Seed Savers Exchange, a network of argriculturalists whose mission is to preserve the diversity of plants.

Unicorn Tapestries Restoration Creates Mystery

Richard Preston of the New Yorker discusses the how two mathematicians aided in the restoration of the Cloisters' famous Unicorn Tapestries and in the process, discovered a mystery.

Paper Trebuchet

If you're one of those people who has always hankered to own your own siege engine but don't have a large enough garage to store it, your prayers may be answered in the form of a paper trebuchet.

Welsh Tsunami, 1607

A new theory speculates that a flood, which killed 2,000 people in southern Wales in 1607, may have been a tsunami.

New Scientific Methods Used to Study Medieval Diet

"Fast or feast: reconstructing diet in later medieval England by stable isotope analysis," an article by Michael P. Richardsa, appears in a recent issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science.

Shroud of Turin Factsheet

Live Science, an online magazine, looks at the history of the Shroud of Turin and offers a factsheet with established facts about the Shroud.

Scientists Link Climate to Viking Violence

A new study shows a colleration between "difficult social periods" discussed in Viking sagas and unusually cold weather patterns.

Medieval Science Page

The Medieval Science Page is a comprehensive directory of cataloged links to resources about general science in the Middle Ages. Topics include alchemy, navigation, mathematics, medicine, botany, timekeeping (horology), weights and measures (metrology), physics, and many others.

Vienna exhibit features working models of Da Vinci's inventions

The Vienna Art Centre offers a new Leonardo da Vinci exhibit featuring 62 working models (some full-scale and some miniature) of his mechanical inventions.

Leonardo da Vinci's Walled-Up Workshop Found

A laboratory once used by Leonardo da Vinci for his research into the natural sciences, but later sealed off by adjacent construction, has been found at a monastery next to the Basilica of the Santissima Annunziata, in Florence, Italy.

The Alchemist: Magician or Metallurgist?

Archaeology looks at the medieval alchemist as chemist rather than magician.

Newswise: Laptops to Replace Picks?

University of New York at Buffalo geophysicist Gregory S. Baker believes laptops may be more effective tools for archeologists than picks and trowels.

Medieval handgonnes and related weapons

This week's Aoife's Links List is on the subject of Medieval Handgonnes, Cannon, Arquebus and Matchlokkes.

Hobbits Discovered in Indonesia?

The skeletal remains of a tiny adult female discovered on an Indonesian island have researchers fantasizing about hobbits.

English Elm Imported by Romans

Botanists believe that all English elm trees may be descended from one tree brought to England by the Romans.

Try your hand at the (virtual) trebuchet!

GlobalSpec, an engineering search engine, has a mathematically-realistic online game that models the physics of a trebuchet.

Did 2nd Century Comet Shake Roman World?

Scientists believe that a field of craters around Lake Chiemsee in southern Germany is the result of a comet striking in earth in the second century.

Scottish historic sites threatened by global warming

Nearly one third of Scotland's 35,000 historic sites, including Skara Brae, are threatened with destruction due to coastal erosion.

Unleash your Inner Leonardo

The point of this Themes list is for you to unleash the inner Leonardo da Vinci in the children. He was inventor, writer, painter, scientist and mathematician, to name but a few of his occupations. If we all had just a little Leonardo in us, the world might be a better place.

Lace, Celtic Knotwork, and Weights and Measures Resources All Online

Aoife offers an eclectic blend this week with annotated resources for: "Lace, Celtic Knotwork, and Weights and Measures."

Introducing Leonardo da Vinci

In her weekly column, Aoife shares her annotated research links on the ultimate Renaissance man: Leonardo da Vinci.