General Science

General medieval sciences, including astronomy, alchemy, metrology, geology, natural philosophy, and similar studies.

"Hogwarts Professor" claims alchemy used to change characters in Potter books

John Granger believes there is so much more to the Harry Potter universe than magic potions. He shares his thoughts through a series of books and lectures which, he hopes, "disclose the underlying symbolism hidden in the so-called 'children’s stories.'"

David may have feet of clay

Experts believe that Michelangelo's famous statue of David is at risk of falling over due to cracks in the ankles caused by poor quality marble. Engineers fear the statue could crumble in event of an earthquake.

Computers create sound of ancient harp

The ASTRA (Ancient instruments Sound/Timbre Reconstruction Application) project has produced the sound of a Epigonion, a wooden string instrument similar to a modern-day harp. This is the first time that this ancient instrument has been heard by modern man.

Medieval stone clock found in Bulgaria

A stone clock or calendar dating to the early Middle Ages has been discovered near Mogila, Bulgaria. The stone features a semi-circle inscribed in Greek with a central axis.(photo)

A genetic map of Europe

A genetic map of Europe constructed by Dr. Kayser, Dr. Oscar Lao and others from Erasmus University Medical Center in the Netherlands, shows where 23 populations live in Europe and the genetic relationships between them. (graphics)

Medieval church windows helped purify air

A new study suggests that medieval stained glass windows covered with tiny gold particles helped to purify the air when sunlight shone through them.

Author claims Da Vinci's drawings based on Chinese technology

Gavin Menzies, who in 2002 theorized that the Chinese reached the America's 7 decades before Columbus, has a new theory: Leonardo da Vinci's drawings were based on scientific encyclopedias brought to Italy in 1430 by a Chinese fleet.

Canterbury Astrolabe Quadrant bought by British Museum

The British Museum recently raised UK£350,000 to buy a rare 14th century astrolabe discovered in Kent, England in 2005. The Canterbury Astrolabe Quadrant is one of only eight such instruments in the world. (photo)

Magellan aided by El Niño

Dr. Scott Fitzpatrick of North Carolina State University has an intense interest in the historic climate. A recent paper by the professor and University of Calgary researcher Dr. Richard Callaghan, hopes to prove that Magellan's 1519 circumnavigation of the globe was aided by weather favorable weather condition including El Niño.

DNA recovered from Viking skeletons

LiveScience reports that Jorgen Dissing of the University of Copenhagen claims to have recovered genetic material from 1000-year-old skeletons from the Danish island of Funen. The DNA samples were removed from the teeth of the ancient Vikings.

Germanic society in England may not have been as brutal as once believed

Recent scientific studies have suggested that the Germanic invaders of England may have imposed an apartheid-like system on the native peoples, but an article by John Pattison of the University of South Australia in Adelaide disagrees. "The evidence is compatible with the idea of a much more integrated society," he says.

1600 volcano affected world climate

UC Davis geology professor Ken Verosub believes that a volcano which erupted in 1600 in Peru may have affected global weather, causing famine in Russia and a late wine harvest in France.

Rune calendar website

Looking for an interesting A&S project, fan of Nordic studies - or just seeking an interesting way to track time - then visit the Gangleri website for an article on Rune Calendars.

Cod bones tell tales

"Fish heads, fish heads..." A recent study of European cod bones shows that "cod were exploited in the Middle Ages from many, often distant, fishing grounds, with an international trade in dried stockfish." The fish were much larger in medieval times, and began to began to be traded around the year 1000 C.E.

Washing through history

The rise of Christianity in Europe may have led to reduced practice of washing, according to Katherine Ashenburg in Clean: An Unsanitized History of Washing. Judith Flanders has the review for The Telegraph.

Arts & Sciences Competition Categories for Estrella War XXV

Dame Anita de Challis, SCA Internal Publicity Deputy for Estrella War XXV, has announced the categories for Arts & Science Competitions at next year's war.

The genius of ancient mechanics

Scientists and mathematicians of the past may not have had computers and other modern scientific instruments to help in their study, but they were pretty darn smart in their abilities to figure things out. The Ancient Mechanics and How They Thought, a recent article in the New York Times looks at what our scientific forebears knew and how they used these ideas.

Tower lions from northwest Africa

Recent study of a pair of lion skulls discovered during excavations of the Tower of London reveals that the lions originated near the Barbary Coast of Northwest Africa. The skulls, which dated from the 13th or 14th centuries, were carbon dated and tested for DNA.

Plans to exhume Galileo cause controversy

Plans to exhume the body of Renaissance scientist Galileo Galilei in order to test his DNA and establish the cause of his blindness have caused problems with the Catholic Church. The Rector of the Basilica of the Holy Cross in Florence, where Galileo is buried, is opposed to the exhumation.

[EAL] Lycanthropy in the Middle Ages

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On Wednesday March 26 at 7:30PM, the Canton of Petrea Thule will be hosting a lecture and discussion on Lycanthropy in the Middle Ages as presented by Mr. Derek Newman-Stille, MA who is the Senior Tutor of Otonabee and Traill Colleges of Trent University.

His talk will include the characteristics of lycanthropy in literature of the middle ages along with how werewolves are described in literature and depicted in Location:
Canton of Petrea Thule (Peterborough, Ontario)

Shroud of Turin photographed in HD

Church leaders and scientists will have a new opportunity to study the famous Shroud of Turin which is rarely seen by the public. The Shroud was recently photographed in high definition, creating a 12.8 billion-pixel image.

Shroud of Turin to be retested

Professor Christopher Ramsey, the director of the Oxford University Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit, is hoping to run new tests on the Shroud of Turin. He believes that tests run in 1988 to date the relic may have been contaminated.

Viking blood common in northwest England

Science Daily reveals that a new study by The University of Nottingham, the University of Leicester and University College London proves that Viking bloodlines are still common in the residents of Northwest England.

Arab scientists filled Dark Ages with light

Writing for The Guardian, Jim Al-Khalili sheds light on the contributions of Arab scientists in the Middle Ages.

Mary Rose gets high-tech scan

Scientists at England's Diamond synchrotron are using intense light beams to help understand sulphur compounds in the timbers of the British warship Mary Rose.

Suffering for beauty has ancient roots

For as long as humans have admired themselves in magazines, mirrors and murky pools of water, they’ve also had to contend with the ugly side of beauty.

Leonardo da Vinci's "Codex Atlanticus" in jeopardy

The Codex Atlanticus, "the largest collection of drawings and writings by the Renaissance master" Leonardo da Vinci, may have suffered extensive damage due to mold.

Roman glue still holds

Archaeologists are working to re-create a Roman "superglue" used to stick silver laurel leaves to legionnaires' battle helmets. Traces of the glue were discovered on iron helmets found near the German town of Xanten which were buried in river mud for more than 1500 years.

Little clock of horrors

Straight out of Pirates of the Caribbean, a 400-year-old automaton clock includes a skull that laughs, screams, bites and launches snakes from its eye sockets. (photos)

Mona Lisa's eyebrows

A new exhibition, "Mona Lisa Secrets Revealed," uses technology to unlock questions that have plagued art historians for generations, including, "What happened to the lady's eyebrows?"