General Science

General medieval sciences, including astronomy, alchemy, metrology, geology, natural philosophy, and similar studies.

Experts use modern technology to preserve Viking grave goods

In 1904, archaeologists discovered a Viking grave, containing wooden artifacts including a richly decorated ceremonial wagon, at Oseberg near the Oslo fjords. Since then, the wood fibers have begun to disintegrate, causing worry among officials at the Museum of Cultural History in Oslo, who have decided to use state-of-the art technology to save the artifacts.

St Winefride's Well on your smartphone

Developers at the Centre for Advanced Software Technology (Cast) at Bangor University in Wales hope that their new smartphone technology will allow visitors to really enjoy the detail of the historic site.

Using science to read the Archimedes palimpsest

In a TEDTalks video on YouTube, ancient books curator William Noel discusses "the fascinating story behind the Archimedes palimpsest, a Byzantine prayer book containing previously-unknown original writings from ancient Greek mathematician Archimedes and others." (video)

Hard tack and salt beef and beer, oh my!

Scientists from Oxford University have determined the diet of sailors aboard the Mary Rose, based on the study of 80 skeletons from the Royal Naval Hospital, as well as the shipwreck. Their report has been published in the American Journal of Phsyical Anthropology.

Welsh and Cornish have purest British DNA

This year, attendees of the Royal Society's summer science exhibition in London will hear the results of an extensive DNA survey of Britain which will proclaim "that Welsh and Cornish people were among the most genetically distinct groups in the country."

Trepanned skulls found in Spain

Two skulls were found in Spain with holes drilled in them. The skulls were found in a cemetery that dates to the 13th and 14th centuries.

"FACES" project to identify historical figures

The University of California, Riverside, has received a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to use state-of-the-art facial recognition software to identify figures in paintings and sculpture.

Pathologist finds answers to medieval mysteries

French pathologist Philippe Charlier has used high-tech imagery and DNA analysis to answer questions about Joan of Arc, Napoleon, and a mistress of King Henri II of France. He is now turning his attention to Richard the Lionheart.

Travel the Roman roads, Google-style

The Roman road network, renowned for its scope and efficiency, has now gotten even easier to travel thanks to an online application from Stanford University.  ORBIS is a geospatial network model that covers hundreds of land and sea routes in the Roman Empire circa 200 CE.

"Reluctance to change" helped medieval Icelanders survive

Most medieval societies faced with plague or natural disasters relied on flexibility to save their cultures, but new research shows that the "people of medieval Iceland survived disaster by sticking with traditional practices."

Ancient Arabic manuscripts reveal abnormal weather patterns

Modern scientists hope to study global weather patterns with the help of ancient scholars. Using writings from 9th and 10th century Iraq, a team of scientists from the Universidad de Extremadura hope to learn about climate change by comparing ancient and modern data.

Viking mice rejected Newfoundland

It appears that Viking mice, which traveled on ships with their human warrior companions, found Newfoundland mostly not to their liking, according to a new study evolutionary biologist Eleanor Jones in the journal BMC Evolutionary Biology.

Adapting to change - Viking style

The world seems to be changing very quickly with climate change, economic turmoil and culture wars taking place around the globe. Scientists studying global change believe much can be learned from the Vikings and how they adapted to their turbulent world.

Volcanoes key to "Little Ice Age"

A new study, led by Gifford Miller at the University of Colorado at Boulder, US, may show that a series of volcanic eruptions around 1300 may have led to the Little Ice Age, which dropped temperatures in Europe in the 1500s.

New Moon

If you look at a medieval calendar, you'll see a column containing a seemingly random series of Roman numerals. These actually represent the dates of new moons. Like many things in the early calendar, the values are based on a theoretical value rather than the actual astronomical event.

A brief history of prosthetics

This facinating photo gallery traces the history of artificial limbs from ancient Egypt though the Rennaisance and into modern times.

The search for lost technologies

For centuries, historians and scientists have bemoaned the loss of ancient technologies such as Greek fire and Damascus steel. In an article for io9.com, Alasdair Wilkins discusses both lost technologies, as well as the lost Apollo mission schematics.

Excerpts from "A history of Ireland in 100 objects"

In honor of St. Patrick's Day, here is a selection of some of the many medieval artifacts featured in The Irish Time's column A history of Ireland in 100 objects.

Iron age bog man gets his head examined

Worsely Man, the 1st century CE skull of a man found in an English bog in 1958, has been sent to Manchester Children's Hospital for a CAT (computer-assisted tomography) scan.

Irish schoolgirl creates method to date ancient manuscripts

Sixteen-year-old Aoife Gregg of Loreto College, St Stephen’s Green, Ireland recently competed in a science competition. Her project: a computer letter frequency analysis of ancient Irish texts to demonstrate how the language has changed.

New botany rules jetison Latin

New rules, approved by the International Botanical Congress in July, will no longer require Latin descriptions of new species for publication in online academic journals and books. The change will be implemented to "speed up the process of officially recognizing new plant species."

Historical Japanese mathematics website online

The National Diet Library of Japan has created a website for the study of Wasan, the mathematics that developed in Japan before the Edo period with text written by Mr. Sato Ken’ichi, Associate Professor, University of Electro-Communications, and Orita Hiroharu, Library Counsellor of the National Diet Library.

The secret of Renaissance acoustics

Scientists have long puzzled over the acoustic properties of grand churches and performances of late Renaissance music with its elaborate, up-tempo harmonies. Now a physicist and a music technologist believe they have cracked the secret.

The Santa marker and the richness of Scottish DNA

Somewhere is Scotland exists one man who carries Santa's DNA, the NM46 marker traced to eastern Siberia and to Lapland, Santa Claus's legendary home. The unidentified man, so far the only one recorded in Scotland, may find himself visited by a relative on Christmas Eve.

Medieval corpses help construct plague genetic code

An international team of researchers has reconstructed the genetic code of the Black Death using DNA extracted from the teeth of medieval corpses buried in a graveyard in London's East Smithfield. Their research has been published in the science journal Nature.

Fibonacci: How numbers helped shape the development of modern Western Europe

In 1202, life in western Europe was changed by the publication of Liber abbaci, a book by Leonardo of Pisa, known as Fibonacci, the first general-purpose book of arithmetic in the West, which "explained the 'new' methods in terms understandable to ordinary people."

Marginalia: An "Invisible College" for Natural Philosophers of the Known World

Friar Galen of Ockham announces the formation of Marginalia: An "Invisible College" for Natural Philosophers of the Knowne World of the Society for Creative Anachronism.

Michelangelo's David heralds beginning of modern science

Most people viewing Michelangelo’s magnificent sculpture of David admire its artistic beauty and proportion, but to Dr. Kelly Cline, the statue symbolizes something else: the birth of modern science. The article appears in the Independent Record (Helena, Montana).

Known World Aviculturists Guild on Facebook

The Known World Aviculturists Guild has its web presence on Facebook, with a site featuring research resources such as links, period illuminations, and discussions by guild members on a wide range of aviculture topics.  A bird is not required to participate in their Society-wide guild--only a genuine interest in how companion birds shaped medieval life.

[ATE] Dragon's Horde

The Barony of Tir Ysgithr is in need of your help! The Dragon has sent an emissary and his threat is dire. He plans to attack our scientists and artisans at the upcoming Science Exposition.