1201 CE to 1300 CE

Plumbing problem reveals crusader murals

A burst pipe in Saint-Louis Hospice, a Jerusalem hospital, has led workers to rediscover 19th century wall murals depicting "crusader knights and symbols of medieval military orders." The paintings were the work of Comte Marie Paul Amédée de Piellat, a French count, who believed himself descended from the knights. (photos)

Discover the art of the Song Dynasty at the Freer/Sackler Gallery

The Freer/Sackler Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution presents an exhibition of Chinese landscape painting from the 10th through 13th centuries entitled Style in Chinese Landscape Painting: The Song Legacy, May 17–October 26, 2014.

St. Sabas seal found in Jerusalem

St. Sabas, a leader of the monastic movement, was a very important person in Jerusalem during the Middle Ages. Recently a lead seal, bearing his image and dating to the 13th century, was discovered during an archaeological dig in the Bayit Vegan neighborhood of Jerusalem. (photo)

Medieval theory of multiple universes?

According to Tom Mcleish, Giles Gasper and Hannah Smithson for an article in The Conversation, 13th century Bishop of Lincoln, Robert Grosseteste, was one of the most dazzling minds of his generation (1170 to 1253) and may have caught onto the modern notion of multiple universes.

Quatrefoil stone helps trace history of Codnor Castle

Codnor Castle, a 13th century stone keep and bailey fortress, is a fragile ruin in Derbyshire, England about which little is known, but the discovery of a 13th century stone quatrefoil may help experts learn more about the structure.

London's Borough Market celebrates 1000 years on site

Medievalists visiting London are often disappointed that little of the medieval city remains, but they may be cheered by a walk through of Borough Market in Southwark which is celebrting its millennium. Stephen Halliday has the story for History Today.

13th century Irish castle laid low by storms

A sad fact of archaeology is that not all historic sites can be saved. The winter storms of 2013-2014 laid waste to one such site, Coolbanagher Castle near Portlaoise, Ireland. The castle collapsed and was later demolished. (photos)

Letters of Wallace and Robert the Bruce on display at Stirling Castle

700 years ago the fate of Scotland was being decided. Now, history buffs will be able to read the words of those concerned in the historic events at an exhibit of letters of Robert the Bruce, William Wallace, and others, at Stirling Castle. The exhibition runs until June 2014. (photo)

Murder declared in Scotland

An unidentified 20-year-old man has been found murdered in Kirk Ness in East Lothian, Scotland, but the murderer will not likely be found. The victim, fatally stabbed four times in the back, was killed in the 12th or 13th century.

"Oldest graffiti in Scotland" found in Mingary Castle

The builders of Mingary Castle on the Ardnamurchan peninsula in Scotland may have been illiterate, but they left their mark on history through their graffiti. The markings, discovered recently in the castle's chapel, were probably inscribed when the chapel was first built, between 1265 and 1295. (photo)

Earthquake may explain Shroud of Turin mystery

An article by Alberto Carpinteri and a group of researchers in Springer's journal Meccanica suggests that an earthquake might explain the mystery of the famous Shroud of Turin, whose cloth has been carbon dated to the 13th century.

"Cradle of the law" to display Magna Carta

In 1214, English barons met in Suffolk to discuss King John and the Magna Carta, a year before it was signed in Surrey. Now the Bury Society will celebrate the event with a display of an original copy of the document at St Edmundsbury Cathedral in Bury St Edmunds.

A violent end for the Finnish swordsman

In November 2013, archaeologists working near Hyvikkälä, Finland discovered the grave of an unknown swordsman dating to the Middle Ages. Recent tests showed that the well-fed, fit individual died a violent death from skull injuries.

Book of Aneirin goes online

The National Library of Wales has announced that it has made the 13th century Book of Aneirin available online. The manuscript, scribed by monks onto animal skin, is regarded as one of the most important books in the Welsh language.

Hennins inspired by hats of Mongolian royals says Medieval PoC

The quintessential "princess hat" of the Middle Ages, the hennin, was inspired by the willow-withe and felt Boqta (Ku-Ku) of Mongolian Queens, according to a blog entry for Medieval PoC. The Mongolian hats could reach up to 7 feet in height and may have served to distinguish men from women at a distance.

St. Chrisopher penny oldest to depict Bohemian king

A silver coin, found recently in the crusader city of Acre, is believed to be the earliest depicting a king of Bohemia ever found. The coin bears the image of St Christopher and the inscription Zl Rex Boemo, king of the Bohemians. Experts place the date of minting in the 13th century. (photos)

13th century church unearthed in Poland

Archaeologists working in Kamień Pomorski (West Pomerania), Poland have discovered the remains of a 13th century Dominican church, part of a larger monastery complex. The church was destroyed in the 16th century.

Technology uncovers medieval defences and settlements in Poland

New studies using LiDAR (aerial laser scanning), electrofusion and magnetic prospection, soil analysis and other technologies have revealed new perspectives on six medieval sites in Poland: Chełm, Rękoraj, Rozprza, Stare Skoszewy, Szydłów and Żarnowo.

Re-enactors to invade Menorca July 2014

Visitors to Spain's island of Menorca in July 2014 will receive a special treat when an historic re-enactment of the island’s invasion by Catalonian and Aragonese troops in the Middle Ages will take place in the capital's Plaza Conquesta.

What's with the snails?

In a blog article for Smithsonian, Colin Schultz wonders why in English manuscripts from the 13th and 14th centuries, knights are always fighting snails. (photos)

Leicester car park mystery continues

Archaeologists are puzzled by the revelation that the occupant of a lead coffin found yards from the grave of Richard III in Leicester, England might be a woman. The grave was believed to have been that of Sir William de Moton.

Restoration allows public to return to St Mary's Priory

Restoration work at 13th century St Mary's Priory in the coastal village of Beeston Regis, England has been completed at a cost just over UK£13,000. Repairs included restoration of 19th century gates and a vandalized roof. (photo)

Cross fragment leads to search for Anglo Saxon village

The discovery of part of a stone cross, dating to Anglo Saxon times, has excited archaeologists from Altogether Archaeology excavating St Botolph’s field in Frosterley in Weardale, England. “This is not the kind of thing that happens every day," said Paul Frodsham, historic environment officer at the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) Partnership.

Modern monk accepts tonsure for charity

Re-enacting Ancient Times Society member Matthew Routledge, of March, England, has played Friar Tuck before, but this time he is serious. Routledge is taking on the part of the monk to raise money for the Stroke Association. Elaine King of the Standard 24 has the story.

13th century volcano changed climate

Medieval texts record an abrupt cooling in the weather in the middle of the 13th century, including a terrible summer in 1258. Now a group of scientists believe they have found the source of the cooling: the eruption of the Samalas Volcano on Lombok Island, Indonesia.

Ammunition tells of attack on Mingary Castle

Archaeologists excavating Mingary Castle in west Ardnamurchan, Scotland have recovered a musket ball and canonball in the moat of the castle, speaking of an attack sometime in its past. Mingary is considered to be "the best preserved 13th-century castle in Scotland."

New scientific techniques to be employed on Rothwell ossuary

Holy Trinity Church in Rothwell, England has a secret: a medieval ossuary lies beneath its floor. Now a team of scientists from the University of Sheffield hopes to learn some of the secrets using the latest scientific technology. (video)

Soil samples help analysize death of Danish child

Analysis of soil samples has revealed the suffering of a 13th century Danish child in the days before his death, according to chemist Kaare Lund Rasmussen from University of Southern Denmark. The 10-13 year-old child from Ribe had been treated with mercury, causing great suffering.

Crusader hospital identified in the heart of Jerusalem

For centuries, a huge, 150,000 square feet building in the heart of Jerusalen was used as a fruit and vegetable market. Now the deserted site has been identified as the largest hospital in the Middle East during the Crusader period.

"Hill of Deer" may have been medieval hunting park

Aerial photography has been used to discover what experts believe was a royal deer park in Gwynedd, Wales, where nobles would have gathered "for entertaining and forging alliances.” The park is located on the Brynkir estate at Dolbenmaen and dates to the reign of Prince Llywelyn the Great in the 13th Century.