1101 CE to 1200 CE

Octopus finds 12th century dish

An octopus caught recently by a Korean fisherman was hauled on board clutching a 900-year-old piece of pottery. The catch has led to the discovery of more than 30 12th century bowls.

Some relics of St. Francis probably did not belong to the saint

Carbon dating done on relics of St. Francis of Assisi have given mixed results. While a tunic, belt and mortuary cushion were dated to the right time period, another tunic, which the church attributes to the saint, did not.

Remembering the Templars

description:
Remembering the Templars: 700 years of History and Myth, as this event is called, takes a look at the trial, dissolution and the subsequent mythology of the Knights Templar. This all day event is free and open to the public, and will take place from 11:00 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. on the California University of Pennsylvania main campus.

Malcolm Barber, University of Reading, will give a key Location:
California University (Borough of California, Pennsylvania)

12th century ship to be salvaged in China

Work is underway to hoist a ship from the Song Dynasty (1127-1279) from the South China Sea in October 2007. The largest Song Dynasty cargo ship ever discovered, researchers expect to find between 60,000 and 80,000 artifacts on board.

Scientists still studying mystery of medieval skulls

Archaeologists from English Heritage have yet to formulate a theory about the change in shape of medieval skulls between the 11th and 13th centuries. The shape changed from a long, narrow head to a rounder shape.

"Lost" coronation abbey unearthed

The location of the abbey at Moot Hill, the original home of the Stone of Destiny, was forgotten centuries ago, but it has now been identified by experts from Glasgow University who have been surveying the grounds of Scone Palace for the first time.

Secrets of Scone to be revealed?

Archaeologists working on the grounds Scone Palace in Scotland hope to learn more about the site where the famous Scottish Stone of Destiny was mined, and more about the country's early history.

Secrets of Assassins' fort unearthed in Syria

Nestled at the foot of Syria's coastal mountains, an ancient citadel has been put on the tourist map by restoration and excavation that revealed mysteries of the medieval Assassins sect that was once based there.

Historic church to open its doors for charity tour

St Mary and St Eanswythe Church, built in 1128 in Folkestone, England, will open its doors for a tour to raise money for repairs. Registration is required for the tour which will take place July 9 at 11:00 am.

Air pollution controls may affect the Tower of London

Science Daily reports that the Tower of London may soon be affected by changes in air pollution regulations that have decreased the amount of sulfur dioxide in the air. The sulfur keeps organisms from growing and darkening the Tower's stonework.

12th century Buddha paintings found

A Nepalese shepherd led researchers to a cave where he had found cave-paintings of Buddha, including a 55-panel mural depicting the life of Buddha, dating back to at least the 12th century.

Relics of Bulgarian Tzar re-buried

After a special ceremony on April 19, 2007 to anoint the remains, relics from Bulgaria's legendary 12th century Tzar Kaloyan were re-buried in Veliko Tarnovo 800 years following his death.

Four Queens: The Provençal Sisters Who Ruled Europe

Four Queens: The Provençal Sisters Who Ruled Europe, is a nonfiction history book set in 13th-century medieval Europe and follows the story of the four daughters of Count Raymond Berenger V and Beatrice of Savoy.

Archaeologist to speak on La Grava manorial and monastic excavation

On May 9, 2007, Evelyn Baker, former manager of the Bedfordshire County Archaeological Survey, presents "La Grava: Bedfordshire's Best Kept Secret," about the 13-year project described as "the most important and extensive manorial and monastic excavation of the 20th century."

Dig set for Edinburgh's Cowgate

Archaeologists are preparing to begin a major dig at the site of the 2002 Old Town fire in Edinburgh's Cowgate district. They hope to find the remains of buildings dating as far back as the 12th century.

Historical Novel Set During Reign of Henry II

Mistress of the Art of Death, a new novel by Ariana Franklin, has been released from Putnam. The story is set in 1171, during the reign of England's King Henry II, based around murders taking place in Cambridge.

Medieval Abbey Undergoing Refurbishment

The medieval Torre Abbey in Torquay is undergoing the first phase of a UK£6.5 million refurbishment to turn it into an educational facility and tourist attraction.

French re-enactor shares armor research

On his website, French re-enactor Bernhardt de Teyssonnière (his period name) shares photos of his armor as well as the sources he used for his research.

12th century watchtower found in Norway

Archaeologists in Trondheim, Norway have discovered the remains of a stone watchtower built in the 12th century during the reign of King Sverre. The tower is believed to have been five stories tall.

Coventry pub renovation reveals dark past

Renovations on the Four Provinces Pub in Coventry, England have unearthed human remains dating to the 12th century. The bones show evidence of leprosy.

Medieval priory found beneath Somerset barn

Researchers working on artifacts found beneath a 16th century barn near Dunster, England believe they belong to the Benedictine Priory of Dunster which dates to 1127 CE. Archaeologists have so far discovered two walls, paving and glazed tile fragments.

Robin Hood to premiere on BBC America March 3, 2007

A new, edgier Robin Hood will join the ranks of hooded men when the latest series made for television debuts on BBC America March 3, 2007 at 21:00 (EST).

A history of the bra

An article in Pravda chronicles the history of the brassiere from ancient Cretan underbodice to the Wonderbra.

Today in the Middle Ages: December 24, 1166

The future King John of England was born on Christmas Eve 1166 C.E. in Oxford, England to Eleanor of Aquitaine and King Henry II. One wonders what his mother thought of her Christmas bundle.

Novel of Crusader Period Reviewed

A new novel reviewed in the Los Angeles Times allows readers "to vicariously experience the drama and political intrigue of the Middle Ages."

War 2, Archaeology 0

Recent bombing and a resulting oil spill in Lebanon have damaged two World Heritage sites, says an inspection team from UNESCO. Roman remains at Tyre and a medieval tower at Byblos are in urgent need of repair.

Today in the Middle Ages: September 30, 1139

Matilda, also called Maud, the daughter of Henry I, landed in England to claim its crown on September 30, 1139. She was the first woman ever to rule the kingdom of England.

Time Team Seeks 12th Century Monastery in Edinburgh

Experts from Channel 4's Time Team have discovered the foundation of an ancient monastery beneath the manicured lawn of Holyrood Palace in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Today in the Middle Ages: September 3, 1189

Richard I of England, called the Lion Heart, was crowned king in Westminster on September 3, 1189. The crusading king never learned to speak English and spent all but six months of his reign abroad.

Today in the Middle Ages: August 30, 1125

Lothair of Supplinburg, Duke of Saxony, was elected King of Germany on August 30, 1125. He would later become Holy Roman Emperor Lothair III.