1101 CE to 1200 CE

Looking for St. Edmunds

A high-tech survey is underway with hopes of learning more about Suffolk, England's ancient shrine to St. Edmund. The geophysical survey will look for traces of the "outline of vanished workshops, storerooms and refectories - the evidence of an extinct way of life" in the abbey ruins in Bury St Edmunds.

Abbey found at Abbeytown

It shouldn't have come as a surprise that archaeologists were able to uncover the remains of a 12th century abbey at Abbeytown in West Cumbria, England, but the discovery was made during rebuilding of the more recent Holme Cultram Abbey which burned in 2006.

Medieval road mapping project reveals 12th century tannery

A team of experts working on a project to map Norman and Saxon roads through central England failed to find them in Wallingford, but instead unearthed a 12th to 13th century tannery.

Early Buddhist paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

An exhibit of early Buddhist manuscript paintings from India, many on dried palm leaves, is being hosted by New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. Early Buddhist Manuscript Painting: The Palm Leaf Tradition will be on display through March 22, 2009.

Extras needed for "Soldiers of Christ"

Clint Buckner from the University of North Carolina School of the Arts in Winston-Salem is looking for a few extras for a short film he is producing. The film will be shot the weekends of November 8-10 and November 15-17, 2008.

12th century Byzantine still found in Bulgaria

Bulgarian archaeologist Prof Nikolay Ovcharov has discovered a 12th century still believed to have been used in the study of alchemy in the remains of a Byzantine mansion near the village of Tatul, Bulgaria.

12th century abbey unearthed at Scone

Archaeologists are excited about the discovery of the remains of the 12th century Augustinian Abbey at Scone Palace in Scotland. While the palace stands, nothing of earlier history has survived above ground at the site. (Video)

Levantia

"Levantia is a site for the social history of the Roman Empire and Near East, roughly between the ninth and thirteenth centuries. It explores this especially by means of practical reconstruction and experimentation. It also includes discussion of the issues of historiographic method and representation in public contexts."

Alabama Welsh Society calls for the return of Madoc's historic marker

The Alabama Welsh Society wants a plaque reinstated marking the supposed arrival of Prince Madoc ap Owain in the U.S. three centuries before Columbus. The legend has it their two ships dropped anchor at what is now Mobile Bay, Alabama, in 1169 or 1170.

Crusaders left genetic mark on the Middle East

Scientists from the Genographic Project, which is tracking human migrations through DNA, have found traces of a particular DNA signature in Lebanon which they link to European crusaders.

12th century "Hoodies" terrorized medieval London

According to historian Professor Robert Bartlett, youth gangs are nothing new. They existed in 12th century London and wore hooded garments which hid their identities during rampages.

Denmark and Cyprus pay tribute to 12th century king

The countries of Denmark and Cyprus recently banded together to honor a 12th century Danish king who died on the island during the First Crusade.

Momote Shiki: Japanese Archery Ritual

Those interested in medieval Japanese archery will want to take a look at the OhmyNews website which has a feature on Momote Shiki: Japanese Archery Ritual including photos and a film clip.

12th century campanile to be saved from fall

Experts are working to keep the 12th century bell-tower in St Mark's Square in Venice from tumbling over after a survey disclosed that the foundation was no longer supporting the structure.

Swedish film series deals with Knights Templar

Arn: The Knight Templar, a 2007 Swedish film, is finding a following among fans of historical movies. The film and its sequel, Arn: The Kingdom at the End of the Road, are based on Jan Guillou's trilogy about a fictional Swedish Templar.

Diplomacy between the sheets

A short article by Helen Castor for The Guardian looks at whether the relationship between Richard the Lionheart and King Philip II of France in the 12th century was diplomatic or physical.

Ceramics trade between Israel and China flourished in Crusader times

New research from the University of Haifa shows that a healthy trade existed between the eastern Mediterranean and China during the 12th and 13th centuries. The trade consisted mainly of ceramics and pottery.

Medieval belt buckle discovered in Scotland

A sewer line breakage in Perth, Scotland, has led to discovery of a copper alloy belt buckle that probably dates back to the 12th century.

Medieval skull and remains found in river

A worker dredging in the River Lark in Suffolk, England, recently found a skull and other human remains from the Middle Ages. The find also included bones from a juvenile and a metal buckle that has been dated to the 14th century.

12th century Cypriot monastery excavated

The excavation of a 12th century Georgian monastery in Paphos, Cyprus is bringing residents of the Mediterranean island and the country of Georgia together, according to reports from the Cyprus Mail. Hope is that the Monastery of Panagia Chrysogialiotissa will become an important archaeological site and tourist attraction.

Time Team finds ancient gate

The BBC's Time Team believe they have discovered the 'Great Gate' of Langthorne Abbey in West Ham, England. The Abbey itself may lie beneath rail lines.

Berlin slightly older than previously thought

An archaeological dig in downtown Berlin has uncovered evidence that the German capital is at least 45 years older than had previously been established.

Making a case for women warriors

Steve Muhlberger of Muhlberger's Early History shares information on Frankish Women Warriors as they appeared in Middle Eastern sources.

Oxford study: England's Later Medieval Queens

A course being taught at Oxford University, through the Berkeley Extension program, covers the history and role of England's later medieval queens from Eleanor of Aquitaine to Elizabeth Woodville.

Viscount Galen of Bristol's blog

Personal blog by Viscount Galen of Bristol of the Middle Kingdom, formerly of Ansteorra, Drachenwald, and Meridies.

Tourists flock to churches built by angels

Legend says that the churches carved into the red rock of Lalibela, Ethiopia were built with the help of the angels. Now tourists have discovered one of the country's holiest sites.

75 medieval graves found in Novgorod

Russian archaeologists have discovered 75 graves dating from the 15th to 18th centuries C.E. in Veliki Novgorod. The experts hope that more tombs will be found.

Octopus finds 12th century dish

An octopus caught recently by a Korean fisherman was hauled on board clutching a 900-year-old piece of pottery. The catch has led to the discovery of more than 30 12th century bowls.

Some relics of St. Francis probably did not belong to the saint

Carbon dating done on relics of St. Francis of Assisi have given mixed results. While a tunic, belt and mortuary cushion were dated to the right time period, another tunic, which the church attributes to the saint, did not.

Remembering the Templars

description:
Remembering the Templars: 700 years of History and Myth, as this event is called, takes a look at the trial, dissolution and the subsequent mythology of the Knights Templar. This all day event is free and open to the public, and will take place from 11:00 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. on the California University of Pennsylvania main campus.

Malcolm Barber, University of Reading, will give a key Location:
California University (Borough of California, Pennsylvania)