1101 CE to 1200 CE

"People of Medieval Scotland" documents individuals from 1093 - 1314

Scotland's Education Secretary Mike Russell has launched a database charting life in medieval Scotland between 1093 and 1314 with software designed to be used in schools. The database was created at the University of Glasgow.

Capitoline Wolf created in the Middle Ages?

One of the most famous symbols of Rome is the Capitoline Wolf, a bronze statue depicting a mother wolf suckling Romulus and Remus. But now experts believe the statue was created during the Middle Ages, with parts as late as the 15th century.

Theft of Codex Calixtinus alleged to be an inside job

Four people, including the former caretaker at Santiago de Compostela cathedral, have been arrested for the 2011 theft of the Codex Calixtinus Of Pope Calixtus II, a 12th-century collection of sermons and liturgical passages.

The will of Sitt al-Ahl

Wealthy Egyptian Sitt al-Ahl died in April 1143, leaving behind as her legacy, her last will and testament chronicling family ties beyond the grave. Jewish historian Renee Levine Melammed recounts her story in the Jerusalem Post.

"An amazing find" of 12th century coins and jewelry found in Sweden

A landowner in Gotland, Sweden made "an amazing find" of over 600 silver coins, jewelry and an axe, dating to the 12th century, while excavating on his land recently.

Robin Hood's grave up for sale

Long to own a real piece of English history? The Kirklees Estate, near Halifax, West Yorkshire, purported burial place of Robin Hood, is for sale for something over UK£7 million. The site includes several farmhouses, 750 acres of farmland and woods, and a medieval Cistercian priory.

Taking the feudal oath online

As part of their Internet Medieval Sourcebook, Fordham University offers a section on medieval feudal oaths as part of a legal discussion of feudalism. Sources were created during the Middle Ages.

Master Ark's jewelry web site

Master Ark has been creating authentic Medieval jewelry for over 25 years.  His cloak clasps, pennanular brooches, fibulas, Thor's hammers, brooches, and pendants are worn throughout the Known World. 

British Library announces plan to digitize Persian documents

The PARSA Community Foundation is teaming up with the British Library and others to provide online access to the Library's 11,000 Iranian manuscripts, one of the largest and best known in the world. The project is scheduled to be completed in 2014.

Thieves steal crusader statue from church window

Sometime between May 13-16, 2012, thieves chiseled the small stone statue of a knight from a window frame in St Michael's Church in Castle Frome, near Ledbury, England. The little knight is thought to commemorate a knight in the Crusades.

The exemplary life of Dolce of Worms

A famous elegy, written in the 12th century, extoles the virtues of Dolce of Worms, a medieval Jewish woman in Germany. The elegy, and its preface, were written by her husband R. Elazar who depicted his wife as the perfect Jewish woman. Renee Levine Melammed profiles husband and wife.

Hildegard von Bingen formally made a saint

Pope Benedict XVI has canonized Hildegard von Bingen, the 12th century German nun who is popularly known today as a mystic and composer.

12th century relics found at site of Eynsham Abbey

Contractors for a housing development at Abbey Farm in Eynsham, England, always expected to discover archaeological artifacts, but they were nonetheless surprised to find extensive remains relating to the 12th century Eynsham Abbey.

"Disgusting attack" on York's medieval hospital appalls local police

"This is a disgusting attack on York's heritage and those responsible should be deeply ashamed," said a North Yorkshire Police spokesman about recent graffiti inscribed on the ruins of York's 12th century St Leonard's Hospital. (photo)

12th century Persian poem receives modern artistic treatment

The Conference of the Birds, an epic Persian poem written by Farid ud-Din Attar in the 1100s, is being published as an artistic version of a graphic novel. The poem was adapted by Czech illustrator Peter Sis.

Heart of St Laurence O'Toole stolen from Dublin cathedral

Police in Dublin, Ireland are puzzled by the theft of the heart of St Laurence O'Toole, a 12th century relic housed at Christ Church Cathedral. The heart, in a wooden box, was stolen March 2, 2012 when the protective metal bars were cut.

British universities come together to study Vikings

"Experts coming together to pass on their knowledge to students in the beautiful environments of Oxford and Kirkwall - what could be better?" said Dr Donna Heddle, director of the Orkney-based Centre for Nordic Studies about the collaboration of scottish and English universities on Viking studies.

New Discoveries inside York Minster

Recent excavation for a "lift" inside York Minster has turned up the remains of 50 bodies in a charnel pit that probably dates back to the 12th century.

12th century Japanese "ogre pot" found in Kashihara City

Japanese Archaeologists working at Shindo Remains in Kashihara City, Nara Prefecture, have found an early 12th century pot with the face of ogre drawn on its surface in ink. Kashihara City was once the location of Japan's capital.

"Unscrupulous foxes:" Contemporary views of medieval military orders

In the 12th and 13th centuries, European military orders such as the Knights Templar and the Knights Hospitaller were powerful and rich. Did their contemporaries love them or hate them? Helen Nicholson of History Today does the research.

Hampshire dig produces evidence of 12th century settlement

The Reverend James Bruce of St Michael and All Angels in Lyndhurst, England wanted a new driveway for the church, and allowed archaeologists to excavate the mound on which the church stands. Under the church, they discovered nearly 100 bits of medieval pottery.

Pope Benedict to Canonize Hildegard of Bingen

The Vatican has announced that Pope Benedict XVI will appoint Hildegard of Bingen as a Doctor of the Church in October of 2012. The 12th century German Benedictine nun is also expected to be canonized in 2012. (video)

"Monks Trod" permanently closed

A medieval byway between two Welsh Cistercian abbeys, and walked by monks in the 12th century, has been damaged by modern traffic. The city councils of Powys and Ceredigion have banned all access, even walkers, from the path to preserve the ancient track.

Will skeletons tell story of Norwegian town?

The people of Stavanger, Norway are on a quest to discover the exact year their town was founded. A good starting place may be with the huge collection of human bones dating to the Middle Ages found beneath their cathedral.

Chocolate is "period" in the American southwest

A paper by Patricia L. Crown, of the Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, and W. Jeffrey Hurst, of The Hershey Center for Health and Nutrition, published on the PNAS website, explores the evidence of the use of cacao in the 11th and 12th centuries in the American Southwest.

1,000 years of British history on church walls

The history and art of Great Britain can be traced by the paintings on its church walls. Now interested parties may not have to travel to review the country's glorious wallpaintings, but can study them online thanks to the efforts of the Churches Conservation Trust.

Crypt columns with "cathedral grandeur" reburied in Devon

"There are only two known crypts in Devon and Cornwall and the other one's a Saxon crypt," said archaeologist Stewart Brown about a Norman crypt excavated in summer 2011. Two intricately-carved columns from the crypt have been reburied for preservation purposes.

British crusaders conquered, then settled in Tortosa

In the mid12th century, English and Welsh crusaders took part in the siege and capture of the Spanish city of Tortosa. Some apparently liked the climate and decided to stay. In an article for the Journal of Medieval History, Antoni Virgili tells their story.

Lost Newtown found in Ireland

Fifteen miles from modern Kilkenny, Ireland, a secret has been buried for centuries. That secret is the lost early Norman town of Newtown, now being decribed as "Kilkenny's Pompeii." LIDAR technology has disclosed the "streets, towns and dwellings" of the settlement.

Bodleian Library digitizes Mishneh Torah

One of the most important manuscripts in the Bodleian Library's Hebrew collection is the 12th century Mishneh Torah, a guide to Jewish law handwritten and signed by Hebrew scholar Maimonides. The manuscript has now been digitized and is available online.