1101 CE to 1200 CE

The heart of a king

Forensic analysis of the heart of Richard I of England, the Lionheart, have revelaed traces mint, myrtle, and frankincense, indicating the heart was embalmed. The heart was probably wrapped in linen.

Catherine Zeta Jones hopes to help find "lost palace" of Welsh princes

Welsh actress Catherine Zeta Jones and her husband Michael Douglas have donated a "substantial" sum of money to help purchase Abergwyngregyn in Gwynedd, the purported site of the "lost palace" of medieval Welsh princes.

Knights of Malta celebrate their 100th birthday at the Vatican

February 9, 2013, marked the 900th birthday of the founding of the Knights of Malta, a Roman Catholic religious order noted for its charitable works. The group celebrated its birthday with a parade around St. Peter's Square and a visit with Pope Benedict XVI, who is himself a member of the Knights.

In search of rockets

While rockets are often thought of as the realm of modern scientists and the military, they have their roots in medieval China. This article traces their roots from a 12th century party trick to their evolution as the terror of Mongolian invaders.

Our Lady of Paris to receive new bells

Notre Dame de Paris, on the River Seine, has seen over 8 centuries of history, from the Crusades to World War II. Now the city will fête the world's best-known church in a year-long celebration that will include recasting of its bells.

Torre Abbey restored ahead of schedule and under budget

A restoration project completed on time is a rare happening. Even rarer is one completed 6 months early and under budget, but that is the case with work on the 12th century Torre Abbey in Torquay, Devon.

Bayeux Tapestry professionally made, claims expert

New research debunks the theory that the Bayeux Tapestry was woven by nuns across England, and shows that the cherished artifact was not a tapestry at all but an embroidery created by a team of professionals under one manager.

Town and Gown unite for East Oxford Community Project

Oxford University and members of the community have joined forces to excavate and document a medieval nunnery at Minchery Farm Paddock near Oxford. Littlemore Priory, a nunnery established in around 1110 was closed by Cardinal Wolsey in 1525.

Concert based on Hawick Missal presented in Scotland

For the first time in nearly five centuries, the people of Scotland will listen to the music of 12th-century century monks from the recently discovered fragment of a missal for Holy Week. The performance will kick off a two-year music and arts project celebrating the creativity of Scotland. (photo)

British MP calls for hunt for the remains of Henry I

England's Reading East MP Rob Wilson has been paying attention to the possible discovery of te remains of Richard III, and would like to have the same experience in his district. King Henry I, son of William the Conqueror, founded Reading Abbey in 1121 and is thought to have been buried there in 1135.

Death-dealing Viking Swords for Sale

Actual medieval and Viking weapons will be sold in London on November 28.

"People of Medieval Scotland" documents individuals from 1093 - 1314

Scotland's Education Secretary Mike Russell has launched a database charting life in medieval Scotland between 1093 and 1314 with software designed to be used in schools. The database was created at the University of Glasgow.

Capitoline Wolf created in the Middle Ages?

One of the most famous symbols of Rome is the Capitoline Wolf, a bronze statue depicting a mother wolf suckling Romulus and Remus. But now experts believe the statue was created during the Middle Ages, with parts as late as the 15th century.

Theft of Codex Calixtinus alleged to be an inside job

Four people, including the former caretaker at Santiago de Compostela cathedral, have been arrested for the 2011 theft of the Codex Calixtinus Of Pope Calixtus II, a 12th-century collection of sermons and liturgical passages.

The will of Sitt al-Ahl

Wealthy Egyptian Sitt al-Ahl died in April 1143, leaving behind as her legacy, her last will and testament chronicling family ties beyond the grave. Jewish historian Renee Levine Melammed recounts her story in the Jerusalem Post.

"An amazing find" of 12th century coins and jewelry found in Sweden

A landowner in Gotland, Sweden made "an amazing find" of over 600 silver coins, jewelry and an axe, dating to the 12th century, while excavating on his land recently.

Robin Hood's grave up for sale

Long to own a real piece of English history? The Kirklees Estate, near Halifax, West Yorkshire, purported burial place of Robin Hood, is for sale for something over UK£7 million. The site includes several farmhouses, 750 acres of farmland and woods, and a medieval Cistercian priory.

Taking the feudal oath online

As part of their Internet Medieval Sourcebook, Fordham University offers a section on medieval feudal oaths as part of a legal discussion of feudalism. Sources were created during the Middle Ages.

Master Ark's jewelry web site

Master Ark has been creating authentic Medieval jewelry for over 25 years.  His cloak clasps, pennanular brooches, fibulas, Thor's hammers, brooches, and pendants are worn throughout the Known World. 

British Library announces plan to digitize Persian documents

The PARSA Community Foundation is teaming up with the British Library and others to provide online access to the Library's 11,000 Iranian manuscripts, one of the largest and best known in the world. The project is scheduled to be completed in 2014.

Thieves steal crusader statue from church window

Sometime between May 13-16, 2012, thieves chiseled the small stone statue of a knight from a window frame in St Michael's Church in Castle Frome, near Ledbury, England. The little knight is thought to commemorate a knight in the Crusades.

The exemplary life of Dolce of Worms

A famous elegy, written in the 12th century, extoles the virtues of Dolce of Worms, a medieval Jewish woman in Germany. The elegy, and its preface, were written by her husband R. Elazar who depicted his wife as the perfect Jewish woman. Renee Levine Melammed profiles husband and wife.

Hildegard von Bingen formally made a saint

Pope Benedict XVI has canonized Hildegard von Bingen, the 12th century German nun who is popularly known today as a mystic and composer.

12th century relics found at site of Eynsham Abbey

Contractors for a housing development at Abbey Farm in Eynsham, England, always expected to discover archaeological artifacts, but they were nonetheless surprised to find extensive remains relating to the 12th century Eynsham Abbey.

"Disgusting attack" on York's medieval hospital appalls local police

"This is a disgusting attack on York's heritage and those responsible should be deeply ashamed," said a North Yorkshire Police spokesman about recent graffiti inscribed on the ruins of York's 12th century St Leonard's Hospital. (photo)

12th century Persian poem receives modern artistic treatment

The Conference of the Birds, an epic Persian poem written by Farid ud-Din Attar in the 1100s, is being published as an artistic version of a graphic novel. The poem was adapted by Czech illustrator Peter Sis.

Heart of St Laurence O'Toole stolen from Dublin cathedral

Police in Dublin, Ireland are puzzled by the theft of the heart of St Laurence O'Toole, a 12th century relic housed at Christ Church Cathedral. The heart, in a wooden box, was stolen March 2, 2012 when the protective metal bars were cut.

British universities come together to study Vikings

"Experts coming together to pass on their knowledge to students in the beautiful environments of Oxford and Kirkwall - what could be better?" said Dr Donna Heddle, director of the Orkney-based Centre for Nordic Studies about the collaboration of scottish and English universities on Viking studies.

New Discoveries inside York Minster

Recent excavation for a "lift" inside York Minster has turned up the remains of 50 bodies in a charnel pit that probably dates back to the 12th century.

12th century Japanese "ogre pot" found in Kashihara City

Japanese Archaeologists working at Shindo Remains in Kashihara City, Nara Prefecture, have found an early 12th century pot with the face of ogre drawn on its surface in ink. Kashihara City was once the location of Japan's capital.